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So I'm looking to get some better looking rims for my 02 EX-4WD. The problem is I can't find anything in the stock 15"x6" size. Would it be possible to go with something that is 16"x6" or even 17"x6" without any real issues?
 

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The most important number is the original tire diameter.....try to stay at, or very close to, the original tire diameter.

Do some searching and learn about wheel/tire “plus” sizing and calculating metric tire diameter based upon the three numbers on the tire sidewall.


From the wheel size chart, your original 205/70/15 tire is the same diameter as a 235/45/18 tire. 16”, 17”, 18” wheels........lots of choices, have fun, just stay at your original tire diameter.
 

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As mentioned, overall diameter, it's important to try to be as close as possible to avoid too much variance in speedo being accurate.

Additionally, you want to be sure to get wheels with the same bolt pattern (5-114.3 for my 2014) and hub bore (64.1 for same vehicle). Also, the rim should be hub-centric, or at least the later models are, verify what yours is so you get the same.

The above being correct, now you can attach the wheel to the hub no issues. But there's still a bit more. Ea wheel type comes with a specific 'offset'. the offset is the indicator of where the mating area for the hub is, inside the wheel, compared to directly in the middle. If the offset is zero, then it is in the middle, but it can be plus or minus, meaning farther in the wheel or farther out, from the center.

It would be good to get wheels with the same offset as the oem wheels, if possible. Some people say varying the offset amount is okay, some say it's a bad idea. There is no empirical evidence one way or the other. You have to make up your own mind on that one.

Lastly is a thing called 'backspace'. Essentially, it kind of tells you if the wheel can be mounted and not hit anything or rub against anything. You can come to a close estimate of what that will be knowing rim width and offset, but no matters what, just mount 1 new wheel by itself and see if it has clearance from brake parts etc. And of course if tires will be much wider you'd want to mount a tire on a rim and verify its clearance.

It's somewhat involved, fun to learn, but possibly depressing as it's not as easy as one might hope.

Cheers and good luck.
 
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