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Hi, I’ve got a 2017 crv, and I’m interested in doing a diy block heater install. I found the official instructions online but it seems like the steps are excessive. Main reason for doing this is oil dilution and wanting to change coolant at (~60k miles). I’m not sure where else the plug and extra wire can be attached such that the splash plate can be easily removed. I looked into dipstick heaters and they looked scary dangerous, I have no idea how effective a pad heater would be, so I’m considering the block heater.

Definitely consider the front grill wire pass through ideal.

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Have you done any research on oil pan pad heaters. Warm oil (better lubrication at cold start-up) has more benefits than warm engine coolant. Since heat rises, engine coolant will be heated some swell. Much easier to install.......no coolant lost at install that must be replaced, etc. Read up a little before making a final decision.
 

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Have you done any research on oil pan pad heaters. Warm oil (better lubrication at cold start-up) has more benefits than warm engine coolant. Since heat rises, engine coolant will be heated some swell. Much easier to install.......no coolant lost at install that must be replaced, etc. Read up a little before making a final decision.
I definitely considered it as a easy and cheap option. However, the block heater seems to have the greatest benefits in this application. I believe the pad heaters are good for dealing with thick oils (OW flows well up to -40). I may be underestimating the pads ability to heat the entire block coolant included, but I believe the heating would be limited to the oil.
 

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So.......what would prevent some heat from the oil pan rising to the block? 0W synthetic oil may flow at -40, but it will not flow well. No oil flows well at -40. Any heated oil will flow much better than cold oil. The coolant in the block is just that.....a coolant, not a lubricant. Just saying.
 

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So.......what would prevent some heat from the oil pan rising to the block? 0W synthetic oil may flow at -40, but it will not flow well. No oil flows well at -40. Any heated oil will flow much better than cold oil. The coolant in the block is just that.....a coolant, not a lubricant. Just saying.
So you think a pan heater would work better than a block heater for fuel dilution?
Though they are similar products, and designed to help with engine starts in cold weather they are different. Main difference being heat capacity due to the block heater being double the watts and being in direct contact with the engine block where we need the heat the most. From what I understand we are trying to warm the bore and piston ring interface pronto to help reduce dilution. I’m in nyc so heat below -10 is not very common. If a small 150w pan heater can warm up the entire engine including the coolant to +30 degrees of ambient I would still consider that a success. Have you used any of these heaters?


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No, I have not used either type of heater. I'm just saying do plenty of due diligence when lookin at/considering either/both types.

I do not know how well/how much coolant temp will rise from a oil pan pad heater......I do know that heat rises so coolant temp must rise some. I also know that heated motor oil will flow much faster than cold motor oil. More oil flow equals better lubrication, not more oil pressure. Heating the engine coolant will do virtually nothing regarding heating the motor oil (heat rises). I'm not sure how heating the coolant affects dilution, but maybe it does.

If the oil is what gets diluted (with gas), wouldn't heating it speed up the evaporation process? A coolant leak is unlikely, but possible, with a block heater. No possibility, zero, zip, nada, of an oil leak with a pad heater stuck to the oil pan. Since a oil pan pad heater is much cheaper than a block heater, heck, how could you go wrong with both? Keep its posted.:thumb:

Two things in this video:

Cold temp
Resistance to flow when oil is thicker

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k1x1FgV_1-w


I'm thinking both of those oils would flow much faster/quicker at +22F vs -22F, thus reaching/lubricating the top of the motor much faster.
 

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I realize this threads fairly old but I just wanted to offer my experience having just installed a block heater in my 2017 CR-V. Before I did it I looked all over on the web and didn’t find anything very helpful in terms of practical advice on how it’s done, except for the Honda installation instructions which tell you to remove the entire front bumper. Turns out the only reason to remove the front bumper is to route the chord, which I found was totally unnecessary as it was easy to do cleanly and securely beneath the hood instead.
The only special tools you need that you may not already have are a 24mm socket for installing the heater, and a 24” breaker bar for removing the old plug. I also printed out a copy of the Honda instructions to reference along the way.
First, drain you coolant from the radiator. I saved mine for re-use since there’s not that many miles on it yet.
Next, disconnect the negative battery terminal and remove the air cleaner and intake air duct as per the Honda instructions. After you remove the required bolts, you’ll need to pull up fairly hard to release it from the pin.
Next loosen the plug in the engine block with a 19mm socket and 24” breaker bar. This is the hardest part, I had to put a lot of force to get it loose, even with a 24” breaker bar, so make sure your socket is properly seated on the bolt. Once you get the plug out, almost a gallon of coolant will come gushing out (even after having drained the rad). I didn’t reuse this coolant, as it falls all over the frame, collecting dust and salt along the way.
Next, install the block heater, plug it in, and route it as per the installation instructions, up until you get to the top of the engine compartment. Instead of going back down to the bottom of the bumper, you can bundle up any excess chord to the right of the air cleaner, zip tie it out of the way, and bring the chord end out wherever you choose (I found that it worked well to fish the block heater end of the chord into the engine area through the opening next to the hood release prior to plugging it into the block heater. My chord now sits centred under the hood, right at the hood release. I think this is better than Honda’s way of doing it, bucause I can tuck it back in under the hood for protection in the summer.)
Now reinstall the air cleaner, connect your battery, and fill up your coolant reservoir (after closing the drain plug of course). Use a gallon of new coolant, plus as much of the coolant you drained from the radiator as you need to top it up. Honda makes it very easy to bleed your coolant in this vehicle, you just need to keep adding as the engine warms up, then check coolant levels after your next few drives as it bleeds itself.
One final point, the Honda dealer where I picked up the parts told me their technicians use 1L of coolant to do the job. They must be reusing the stuff that drains all over your frame, I highly recommend buying a full gallon, or even two if you want to accomplish a full coolant change at the same time as the block heater install.
That’s it, as you can see it’s not all that difficult since you can do everything from above, and it saved me about $200 in labour over having Honda do it. I hope someone finds this helpful!
 

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This is an older thread. With the excellent post by @OBS, AND the fact that this info is be easily found via SEARCH, time to close.
 
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