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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It was a beautiful day for doing some DIY personalization and improvements. If you dont know what Plastidip is, look it up, pretty much a must have for any DIY-er.

I was more in a testing and having fun kind of mood, so dont mind the scummy wiper arms. If this stuff holds, I'll be impressed, as I didn't clean off the flaking paint from underneath.

Both items, I just shot them with some brake cleaner, wiped them off. Didnt take a before - after for the rear, but I'm sure you guys know what that looks like.

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License plate frame looks sharp. Came out clean. I like it.
 

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Hmm, I guess it works, I wonder are the metal base before it is connected to the wiper arm rusted and crack or are they just scratches that makes the surface look uneven.

Is it liquid plastic in a can or is it one of those liquid rubber in a can used for sealing stuff? I guess everything is sealed into place now without it rusting. I really would wonder how it will hold up long term and various temperatures. If any parts chip off or fade with some long term exposure. By the way did you have to paint the spring underneath the arms also?


When I did my arms with the 89 Corolla, I had to sand it down first and I just used Rust-OLeum shiny black and put 2 coats on and then covered it with clear coat. It looked brand new right from the factory. Though I don't think it was suppose to be shiny. No rust holes, but the entire arm was just rusted and faded.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you for all of the comments everyone =) The tag plate was so easy to dip, that it is hilarious. Expect more CRV dipping haha! One can did my plate trim 5 coats, wiper arms 5 coats, and my mesh grille 5 coats. Theres still some left, but not enough for me to start a new piece.

Hmm, I guess it works, I wonder are the metal base before it is connected to the wiper arm rusted and crack or are they just scratches that makes the surface look uneven.

Is it liquid plastic in a can or is it one of those liquid rubber in a can used for sealing stuff? I guess everything is sealed into place now without it rusting. I really would wonder how it will hold up long term and various temperatures. If any parts chip off or fade with some long term exposure. By the way did you have to paint the spring underneath the arms also?


When I did my arms with the 89 Corolla, I had to sand it down first and I just used Rust-OLeum shiny black and put 2 coats on and then covered it with clear coat. It looked brand new right from the factory. Though I don't think it was suppose to be shiny. No rust holes, but the entire arm was just rusted and faded.
Just watch this video, you will see what Plastidip does. If you get interested, keep watching how he dips entire cars, and other projects he does. It's very impressive, especially the one where he brings a faded & worn paint job back to factory new look.

Dip Your Car - Myths About Plastidip
 

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After watching that video... it looks pretty awesome, though since it is rubberish I wonder about a few things, if the piece will expand and contract with varying temperature. If I had to use it on a particular space I would do the wheel wells and under the door panel where the road salt and sand goes crashing on...

It seems much more efficient than my ol way of duct tape, looks like it is good if you have a clean surface, wonder if rust or blemish under will still rot away and the application will fall off, or if it will provide an air tight seal. It says you can remove it if you want and when you power wash it was still on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
After watching that video... it looks pretty awesome, though since it is rubberish I wonder about a few things, if the piece will expand and contract with varying temperature. If I had to use it on a particular space I would do the wheel wells and under the door panel where the road salt and sand goes crashing on...

It seems much more efficient than my ol way of duct tape, looks like it is good if you have a clean surface, wonder if rust or blemish under will still rot away and the application will fall off, or if it will provide an air tight seal. It says you can remove it if you want and when you power wash it was still on.

If you browse through their channel, Dip Your Car, you can find a job that they did on a 70s model pickup truck. They did a meticulous cleaning job, and dried it for a day or two. Then they sealed the entire thing with plastidip. Not only did it look amazing, but they claim they just sealed in the car, so the rust will halt until the owner can afford a frame off restoration.

Their local is Florida, USA, so they deal with high temp and humidity all the time, and their dipped cars seem to not be phased by it at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Did this on my Gen1 peeling window trim. Came out great the 2nd time

uhh... yeah don't let this stuff dry and THEN try to peel off the masking tape. :rolleyes:

Rip it off after your final coat while it's still wet!
If you're doing a masking job, yes. But you should mask trim away from it, and peel the over spray. It will trim itself.
 
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