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2nd post here. Just bought a 2018 CRV Touring model here in Texas today. I need to drive to California tomorrow with it. About 1300 miles. How should I drive it? I read somewhere that I shouldn't use cruise control. I don't know how the heck I could do that. I don't plan on treating it harshly or going over the speed limit. I'll take it easy on acceleration and braking too.

Should I change my oil when I look forward to talking with you all!

Thanks!
 

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2nd post here. Just bought a 2018 CRV Touring model here in Texas today. I need to drive to California tomorrow with it. About 1300 miles. How should I drive it? I read somewhere that I shouldn't use cruise control. I don't know how the heck I could do that. I don't plan on treating it harshly or going over the speed limit. I'll take it easy on acceleration and braking too.

Should I change my oil when I look forward to talking with you all!

Thanks!
Per the Owners Manual
- First 200 miles: avoid hard braking.
- First 600 miles: avoid sudden acceleration or full throttle operation, and don't tow a trailer.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Per the Owners Manual
- First 200 miles: avoid hard braking.
- First 600 miles: avoid sudden acceleration or full throttle operation, and don't tow a trailer.
I cant seem to find that information in my owners manual. Mine says "owners guide" though. Is that different? That's all they gave me..
 

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I cant seem to find that information in my owners manual. Mine says "owners guide" though. Is that different? That's all they gave me..
Yes, two different manuals. Owner's Guide is simplified and has 90 pages, whereas Owner's Manual has 679 pages. It's free for reading or download from Honda.
http://owners.honda.com/

Sent from my XT1650 using Tapatalk
 

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Unless the Earth has shrunk, last time I checked it's over 1,600 miles, not 1300. Maybe you know a shortcut? Unless you're going just from El Paso to Riverside. In which case, never mind.

Different people have always had different break-in procedures but for common sense, mine are: For the first 500 miles:

1. No excessive idling, and no revving the engine over 2500 rpm.

2. Drive at varying speeds. Do not drive for more than one minute at a set speed.

3. Do not drive at any speed that causes the engine rpm to exceed 2500 rpm.

4.Keep a close eye on all fluids and maintain at exactly where they are supposed to be.

5. At end of break-in period, increase variation from rules very gradually.

There are some very specific reasons for these precautions, but the main one has to do with seating the piston rings and proper break-in of the main bearings. Some folks will doubtless tell you that materials have changed so much over the years that this is no longer necessary, but they are mistaken. Materials have changed, but while those materials are different, they are not better. Just different. It is critical that the rings seat properly at the cylinder walls, to establish good compression and good oil control/lubrication. Running the engine at widely varying speeds when brand new is critical for them to seat correctly. A long trip where the rpm stays at an exact speed is not good for the rings or the cylinder walls. It can also cause excessive temps at the metal-to-metal point of contact. After all, it's about friction. If your engine has a turbo, it's even more critical. It may sound like a pain, but it's only the first 500 miles, a third of your trip. There are probably a lot of places where it would be fairly unnecessary to worry too much about it, but there are some parts of Texas where it's so flat for so far that it could be a problem. Heck, there are places there where, if you can find a nice big rock to stand on, and you have a good set of binoculars, you can see the back of your own head.

If your rings seat well, you are golden. If they do not, you will have excessive oil blow-by and slightly reduced power, and the lifespan of the rings will be considerably shortened. You can choose to completely ignore all you hear or read or see, and do what you like. After all, it's your money. But you can't say you were unaware now. Oh, and, for doubters, a question: I wonder how much the oil-fuel issues in the new engines has to do with the rings? Hmmm.
 

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Owners manual is only available online or you can order one to be mailed to you. Search and the link has been posted several times.
If you click on the link to the owners manual, it can be downloaded as a PDF file to your computer.
I also ordered a printed owners manual from Honda by calling them up, but it took an absurd 3 months.
 

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To a large extent, engines are engines. While Honda is pretty loose about break-in, others are more specific. Jeep, for example, suggests limiting cruise speeds to 50-55mph for the first 300 miles. Further, Jeep suggests that after the first 50 miles a few wide open throttle applications while cruising contributes to a good break-in. These throttle applications “load” the piston rings and encourage a more perfect seal. These recommendations make general sense to me.

So, if I were in the OP’s shoes and had no alternative I’d:

1) Limit cruise speed for the first few hundred miles at least
2) Vary speed and do not use cruise control
3) Don’t accelerate hard from a stop but do use a few hard throttle applications while cruising
4) Avoid Interstates for the first few hundred miles, which may make this easier

It could be that some of the fuel dilution problems we see here are a function of a poor break-in and resulting poor ring seal, so if you have the 1.5T this process may be more important than usual.
 

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I have not followed any sort of break in for the new vehicles I have purchased. Just drive it normally. If you need to floor it, no big deal. In fact, I wouldn't be surprised if the engine slowly increases the max horsepower available as the engine breaks in. Motorcycles have been doing this for almost 20 years. These cars have a CVT transmission, which is infinitely variable at any speed. Once again if it is important to vary the engine speed during break in, then the Honda engineers would have the transmission vary the engine speed as needed during the break in period.
 

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I have not followed any sort of break in for the new vehicles I have purchased. Just drive it normally. If you need to floor it, no big deal. In fact, I wouldn't be surprised if the engine slowly increases the max horsepower available as the engine breaks in. Motorcycles have been doing this for almost 20 years. These cars have a CVT transmission, which is infinitely variable at any speed. Once again if it is important to vary the engine speed during break in, then the Honda engineers would have the transmission vary the engine speed as needed during the break in period.
More likely Honda understands its owner base is unsophisticated in the extreme about things mechanical and doesn’t want to make demands. Plus, varying the CVT programming during break-in would likely violate some part of the EPA fuel economy certification ritual.
 

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No suggestions to "drive it like you stole it" to break in the engine correctly? :D
OK:

DRIVE IT LIKE YOU STOLE IT! :beb:





But more Seriously, do what Larry aka kloker said in Post #11. The main reason that Honda says don't use Cruise Control is because a constant RPM doesn't provide the best break-in. That's why they don't recommend long idling periods, either.

You could use Cruise for 15 minutes at a time, drive it manually, then 'rest' again. (I like to tap my feet to the music.)
 

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You have received many great suggestions here. Enjoy you first long ride in your new CR-V.

Follow the links on http://owners.honda.com/ and you can order on-line the 'big' owners manual in print form free if ordered in within the first six months of new vehicle purchase. It is the best reference book you can have and read about how to care for your new Honda. Also you can download it in pdf to any computer/portable tablet/phone; and that is a great idea to have on hand when you are away from home and need to review something.

Have a safe trip and update us after you return home. Cheers!
 
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