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2018 EX-L fwd
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Another thought, does your soft pedal pressure remain constant? If it doesn't, you might have bad o-rings inside your master cylinder.
 

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2013 Honda CR-V EX-L (no navigation)
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Discussion Starter #22
Another thought, does your soft pedal pressure remain constant? If it doesn't, you might have bad o-rings inside your master cylinder.
Yes the pedal holds its position with both light and heavy pressure. It appears the master cylinder works fine. I tried the master cylinder testing below.

How to Test the Brake Master Cylinder

I am driving the car for more than two years and the pedal feels the same even after the brake fluid change so I will not investigate this any more.
 

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Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
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If your pedal seems soft initially but is firm once it gets to a certain point (and you are sure that there isn't air in the ABS pump) then you may need to bleed with the calipers unbolted so that you can move them around while bleeding. Similar to bench bleeding, the issue may be captive air in a caliper that won't come out unless you 'turn it around' to a different orientation.
One of the sports cars I am associated with needs the wheel calipers disconnected to do a proper bleed.


Another strategy to diagnose an issue like this is to clamp CLOSED each rubber brake line in turn, then see if that changes the feeling. (DON'T drive the car like that, of course.) That could isolate which caliper is causing you grief.

.
 

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I changed the brake fluid on my 2013 CRV EX-L 2.4L with DOT 3 synthetic Prestone using my Mittivac vacuum brake bleeder. The pedal is on the soft side (as it was before), not spongy but I am not happy. I have changed the brake fluid with this vacuum brake bleed in several cars in the past and always I had a firm pedal without any air in the system. I did FL, FR, RR and RL by adding grease around the threads to avoid air in the system. With the bleeder closed and the hose connected the vacuum was held fine showing an air tight system but when I was cranking the bleeder, especially on the back wheels I could see air bubbles running thru the hose. I do not think with all this vacuum air was able to move into the system.

Do you have a somewhat soft pedal in your CRVs? Am I missing something for the CRV?

Get braided steel hoses. Most average consumers don't expect a hard pedal
 

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I changed the brake fluid on my 2013 CRV EX-L 2.4L with DOT 3 synthetic Prestone using my Mittivac vacuum brake bleeder. The pedal is on the soft side (as it was before), not spongy but I am not happy. I have changed the brake fluid with this vacuum brake bleed in several cars in the past and always I had a firm pedal without any air in the system. I did FL, FR, RR and RL by adding grease around the threads to avoid air in the system. With the bleeder closed and the hose connected the vacuum was held fine showing an air tight system but when I was cranking the bleeder, especially on the back wheels I could see air bubbles running thru the hose. I do not think with all this vacuum air was able to move into the system.

Do you have a somewhat soft pedal in your CRVs? Am I missing something for the CRV?

personally I use one with an air compressor instead of a hand pump. But the order in which you did this is incorrect, It should be RR, LR, RF then LF.
 

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2013 Honda CR-V EX-L (no navigation)
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Discussion Starter #26

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If it was kind of soft before the bleed, guess what, the fluid isnt the problem. Can be a number of things. The replies here are good examples of why a mechanic the a better idea than diy in many cases.

Simply wore down pads front or rear, issues with caliper or hardware etc all can cause a soft feeling pedal.

If the pedal is hard and stays after 1st press (releasing and pushing a second time) then likely nothing wrong.

Sent from my SM-N975U using Tapatalk
 

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Just exchanged the brake fluid on mine today. Just put an 18” silicone tube over the bleed screws, cracked them open and let them drip out. The screws are at an upward angle, so the soft hose curves up then down for a nice visual air trap. I got impatient towards the end, and ended up pumping the pedal to speed it up. No need to close the bleed between pedal presses as the arc in the tube kept enough fluid to prevent any air drawback. Test drove it afterwards. Pedal feels good. Not that I believe wheel sequence actually matters, but for those of you thinking it does...... My observation today contradicts what most here are saying. The longest to shortest fluid path is as follows:
LR, RR, LF, RF. I could be wrong about it, but I doubt it. For certain, the RF is the shortest.
 

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You do have to somewhat pay attention when you have abs because of how the fluid flow from master to wheel moves through the abs controller. The "furthest" thing I never really understood because it really doesnt matter on 4 wheel abs. Without abs it's just easier to longest to shortest because of the amount of air that can get stuck and give you headaches (making bleeding take longer).

When changing fluid for maintenance bleed order means absolutely not a damn thing. Just a thing to make you think, shop fluid changes all 4 blenders are opened and fluid pumped into master while sucked put all 4 tubes attached to all 4 blenders at the same time.

Sent from my SM-N975U using Tapatalk
 
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