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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all. I have a 2012 lx with about 40,000 miles. I have recently heard squeaking when braking so I went to jiffylube for a free brake inspection. I've attached a picture of their analysis, but they wanted about 290 after tax for a rear brake job. They said the front pads are 75%, rear pads are 50%, front discs are 50%, and rear discs are 25%. Rotor looks fine, etc. I have a local mechanic who will be cheaper but just wondering what I should be paying. I assume they would do both the pads and discs for that price, as the parts aren't that much (e.g., 15 for disc, 40 pads)? Also I plan to do this within two weeks due to the holidays, but will it be ok to drive in the meantime without putting the rotors at risk? Any help is most appreciated?
 

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The picture doesn't have good resolution. Hard to read. I can make out a lot of "Good"s though. What do they mean by rear discs are 25%, rotors are fine? Does the price include resurfacing the rear rotors?

Did the sound come from the front or rear? I would run the CRV through a car wash with wheel blasters and check if the squeak is still there. Brake pad wear is indicated by distinctive metallic "screeeech".
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the replies. We do a lot of city/back roads driving, so that could accelerate the decline. According to jiffylube the rotors are completely fine, same with the calipers and drum. On their car diagram they list "brake disc," "disc brakes," "wear indicator," "inner brake pad," and "outer brake pad." Their measured specs are as follows: left front pad (actual = 8 mm, crv specification? = 1.6), right front pad (actual = 8 mm, spec = 1.6), left rear pad (actual = 6 mm, spec = 1.6), and right rear pad (actual = 7 mm, spec = 1.6). They then list the following: "front pads (75% life), "rear pads (50% life), "front disc (50% life)," and "rear disc (25% life)." It does not specify what the "disc" refers to or how they got their calculation percentage. I was hoping it could be rust/dust or weather changes, but the screeching does now happen more consistently regardless of time of day. It is a low pitched squeak but is noticeable. A good car wash wouldn't hurt anyway though:). I'm willing to get them done sooner to prevent it going too long and risking more damage, though just curious what a fair price is, or should I wait for pads to go lower? Thanks!
 

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Your brakes are fine, the front pads when new have about 10-11mm of pad, they now have 8 and replacement is 1.6mm. The rear are 8-9mm new, they now have 6-7mm with replacement by 1.6mm.

Clean and grease the sliders maybe scuff the rotor surfaces with the proper disc and keep driving.

BTW, you don't have any brake drums.
 

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Brake pads are easy to replace, half an hour at most and very cheap. Personally, I go with metallic rather than organic pads, they last longer and grip better.
 

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I looked at some sites online. The brake service charges range from $139 - $309 per axle. Rotor resurfacing is included only in the $309 package. The measurements indicate pads have quite a bit of wear left in them. I would find out exactly what they are going to do for $290.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks all. Well the quote of 290 was from jiffylube and they were going to replace the rear disc and pads. Since the pads seem to have a lot of life let, does anyone know what the "rear disc 25% life" might refer to?
 

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crvneuro, I can't read your repair estimate, I don't want to speculate as to what the Jiffy Lube technician may have meant with his notations. So, let's go at this from another direction.

As you may know, brake pads consist of a layer of friction material, approximately 9mm thick (edited), bonded to a metal backing. In your situation, it's conceivable that the friction material has worn down the metal rotors -- which I assume is what the technician meant with his notation about "25% rear disc life" -- but that's highly unlikely. It's much more likely that he meant the friction material on the brake pads has only 25% of their life remaining, but I'm guessing. However, based on your description of where you drive your CR-V, that's more likely.

So, now what? Well, once the friction material is completely worn down, the metal backing will begin to cut into the metal brake discs, ruining them. Then, and only then, will you need to replace them or have them resurfaced. In other words, if you replace the pads before they wear out, that's all you'll need to replace, and brake pads are cheap -- approximately $70-$80 for a set of rear brake pads. (Footnote of sorts: You're likely to get all sorts of recommendations about brake pads -- OEM, aftermarket, types of pad material, etc. I leave that to you to sort out.) FWIW, I've never had a problem with OEM (Honda) pads, and they are very inexpensive if you buy them online.

As noted above, brake pads are easy to install if you opt to do it yourself. If you have the work done for you, you can expect to pay for an hour's labor to replace the pads and lubricate the component parts. You shouldn't have to replace the brake rotors (if that's what the Jiffy Lube tech was inferring), and I wouldn't allow the shop doing the work to resurface them either. All that does is literally shave metal off the rotors, shortening their life. That also makes them much more susceptible to overheating and distortion.

Finally, it's not unusual for CR-Vs (and Accords) to wear out their rear pads first. In fact, it's quite common. Were I you, if you don't want to pay a Honda store to do the work for you, I'd look around (ask friends, etc.) for the name of a trusted independent brake repair shop to do the work for you. I would not get brake work done by Jiffy Lube (nor would I take my CR-V there for oil changes, but that, too, is a subject for another time).
 

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Get a second opinion.
The friction material thickness specs are online, 2012 CRV rear pads do not start with 15mm of friction material, your rear brake pads are not at 25% left, you do not need a brake job.
 

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13CRVEXLKC: You are correct in one regard: The original pad material is approximately 9mm, and I edited my post above to reflect that. (Chalk my error up to a lack of coffee and guesswork on my part.) As for the OP not needing pads, he wouldn't be the first CR-V owner to have needed rear pads at 40k miles.
 

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13CRVEXLKC: You are correct in one regard: The original pad material is approximately 9mm, and I edited my post above to reflect that. (Chalk my error up to a lack of coffee and guesswork on my part.) As for the OP not needing pads, he wouldn't be the first CR-V owner to have needed rear pads at 40k miles.
He may need them but the info he posted claims the rear pads have 6-7mm of pad remaining, to me they are worn 25% not 25% remaining.
 
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