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Discussion Starter #1
The brake pedal on son's CRV (2007) goes almost to the floor before the brakes start to have an effect.

I believe they call this "low pedal reserve".

The system has never been opened up. The pads are fine.

The dealer wants $120.00 to diagnose the problem.

Has anyone had and solved this problem?

Thanks in Advance.

Pete
 

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Do more googling for possibly quicker answers.
Check out the links below this post under the Similar Threads header for possible answers.
Buffalo4
 

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Time to replace all the brake fluid and bleed the brakes - Honda Brakes are not closed and absorb water from the air and cause the pedal to become mussy..
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Time to replace all the brake fluid and bleed the brakes - Honda Brakes are not closed and absorb water from the air and cause the pedal to become mussy..
Do you know for a fact that this actually fixes the problem? I don't want to sound like I'm challenging you but I have done a lot of searching (as suggested by Buffalo4) before I started this thread. There is a whole lot of bull out there with lots of bogus suggestions.

And in this case, the pedal isn't mushy. There is just a lot of travel but when it gets close to the floor it is very "crisp" and firm.
 

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Brake fluid does not compress -water in brake fluid compresses that could be the cause - it is the cheap fix -if that does not fix the problem it is the Master Cylinder.

I know that early (1988-1994) accords had master cylinder issues - I have not see any with newer.

If a mechanic put power steering fluid in the brake master cylinder it will cause failure and no petal over time. The master cylinder would have to be replaced as the seals are compromised.
 

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Water does not compress, larryr. but if the moisture in the brake fluid turns to steam, than yes, the steam will compress.
Petec, hopefully a crv owner who experienced this problem will post their experience and fix.
Perhaps tomorrow you will get a good answer.
Has anyone tried bleeding the brakes yet? Usually you do that for a mushy brake pedal , not for too much travel, before it gets firm.
Till then, check out : http://www.crvownersclub.com/forums/14-problems-issues/4865-brake-pedal-travel.html
Time for me to call it a night.

Buffalo4
 

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X2 on replacing the brake fluid and bleeding the brakes as an initial step.

As you mentioned "the system has never been opened up" I would do that^^^, and lubricate the caliper slider pins, FRONT and REAR. You are WAY overdue for new brake fluid (recommended every three years regardless of miles by Honda)


You don't mention the mileage on the V or whether it was purchased new or used.


+++++++++++++

Brakes are important. If you don't want to bring the car to a dealer (the diagnostic charge would probably be applied to the repair if the dealer does the work), then bring it to an independent Honda specialist near you.
 

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I certainly wouldn't drive it anywhere if its that dangerous.
Agree on the drain all old brake fluid and refilling with the right spec fluid.
While draining at each wheel, pull the sliders to make sure they are rust free. After all, you are in a snow belt area and rust happens. Check disc thickness and make sure its within specs and pads are wearing evenly.
Get this far you haven't spent much money at all and made sure everything is good.

If pedal continues to stay soft or goes to the floor, then your problems are elsewhere. As others have suggested you are now looking at the master cylinder and replacing it.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Buffalo4:
Right, water doesn't compress.
Not a steam problem, it does it when parked overnight.
No bleeding yet, that is usually for mushy not firm but low.
I already went through that "Brake Pedal Travel" link. No real conclusion. He thinks it might be getting better.
Nighty night.

Carbuff2:
New fluid and bleeding just seems like a shotgun approach, "hope a pellet hits the bird". I just sold my 1999 Ford Econoline van with over 150k miles on it. I never changed the fluid or bled the system. I put in new pads many times and a few new rotors and even drums in the back.

Bleeding implies air in the system. From where?
Why does Honda say change the fluid every three years?
Don't get me wrong, I am not disagreeing with your solutions, I just wish I knew the cause.

rocky (And everyone):
I would love to get my hands on this problem but my son is near Nashville, TN and I am near Buffalo, NY. He can't come to me and I can't load up all my tools and head there.

Thanks,
Pete
 

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Carbuff2:
New fluid and bleeding just seems like a shotgun approach, "hope a pellet hits the bird". I just sold my 1999 Ford Econoline van with over 150k miles on it. I never changed the fluid or bled the system. I put in new pads many times and a few new rotors and even drums in the back.

Bleeding implies air in the system. From where?
Why does Honda say change the fluid every three years?
Don't get me wrong, I am not disagreeing with your solutions, I just wish I knew the cause.

Thanks,
Pete
In order to confirm that components are working as designed, all maintenance needs to be performed first. I can't tell you how many times folks have brought their cars in for misfiring, and the first thing any shop does is change the plugs. Even if they are new.

Brake fluid absorbs moisture, and this moisture can attack the metal brake lines. I have two acquaintances who have suffered brake line failure (usually during an emergency stop) because metal brake lines have corroded and leaked. THAT is why Honda recommends periodic flushing. I think you were lucky with the Econoline (especially if the car was in Buffalo).

Old brake fluid gums up ABS pumps, and the Low Brake Fluid warning switches that are in the reservoir caps. BTDT.


++++++++++

Given the distance between you guys, I'll reiterate my suggestion that he take the V to a local Honda specialist in Music City, for diagnosis and repair.



Welcome to the Adult World, kid...

(No disrespect of course) :rolleyes:
 

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CarBuff has forgotten more than most of us know so don't be questioning his approach to the problem. Bleeding and replacing the fluid is relatively easy and certainly inexpensive - use Honda fluid BTW. He's like most of us who would start with the easiest solution and proceed from there. You confess the system has been intact for 9 years - I'm surprised you've had no problems before this. You have to start somewhere so start there. JMO. Craig
 

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I Don't think I'm a genius! <BLUSH>


The question is, can his son do any of the work himself? Or with the help of friends?


Funny Thing, my Bro' is a musician in Nashville...but I always need to fix his cars when I'm there.
He's a MUCH better Mandolin player than I'll ever be, however.
 

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Most American Cars have a closed brake system. Only the air in the reserve touches the fluid.

Most Japanese cars have an open brake system - the air touched the brake fluid and is continuously being replace with fresh air. thus the brake fluid absorbs moisture from the air. And Honda says never go more than 3 years, 2 years in high humidity areas ( like on a lake or the ocean or Florida)
 

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Bleeding ALL the old brake fluid out every 3 yrs or so is, AFAIK, to get any moisture out of the Brake Fluid plus some of the dirt,etc that may be in there, and helps ensure against any air or gases in the fluid which can greatly soften the pressure on the brakes.
Moisture in the brake fluid causes corrosion. I use Valvoline Dot 3&4 Synthetic Brake fluid in my '03 Ody.
Replacing all the brake fluid (including the reservoir) is damn good maintenance and should be done. I don't think it will solve his problem, but not doing it is asking for more problems with the brake system.
Slider pin free operation is also a necessity for proper braking.
It doesn't take a lot of time or tools or experience to change all the brake fluid while bleeding the brakes.
It would be an excellent starting point.
The Master cylinder is well worth researching.
Best of luck and when you find the cause, please post it.
Buffalo4
 

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Given the relative negatives of an open air system, why is it used in today's cars ?? Other than probably boosting their service revenues, it seems there are no positives. TIA. Craig
 

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Well I have learned something. I thought all brake systems were sealed tight because Brake Fluid is so hydroscopic. I have never heard of an pen system. I drove my Pilot for 11 years and 251,000 miles and never changed the brake fluid. Then again the early Pilot's all had softer brakes from Day 1. Guess I will be changing brake fluid at 2 years here in North Carolina.

BTW - Why does Honda say not to use DOT 5 but use DOT 3 or 4? I thought 5 was the latest and greatest version?
 

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