Honda CR-V Owners Club Forums banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Everything in Moderation
Joined
·
7,625 Posts
Define 'fully broken in'


There is no need to drive differently than normal for the first few KMs (1000). The only exception is, don't go on any long interstate highway trips where you maintain a constant RPM.

Other than that you don't need to 'baby' the car, just drive as normal.

If you are wondering about break-in oil, Honda says to let it run to the first Maintenance Minder notification. No need to change the oil early.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
579 Posts
Define 'fully broken in'


There is no need to drive differently than normal for the first few KMs (1000). The only exception is, don't go on any long interstate highway trips where you maintain a constant RPM.

Other than that you don't need to 'baby' the car, just drive as normal.

If you are wondering about break-in oil, Honda says to let it run to the first Maintenance Minder notification. No need to change the oil early.
Define 'long interstate highway trips' :D 5 miles? 100 miles? 63.7 miles? :p

Should be 'fully broken in' at around 200K miles. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
776 Posts
If you do choose to drive a new car on an extended "highway" trip, just vary the speed (RPMs) a bit for the first say 500 miles (just an estimate) The idea is no prolonged higher speeds - the tolerances in new motiors are much better than in the "good old days" ! Don't overthink it. Craig
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the inputs guys. I dont baby all my vehicles. I believe in the hard break ins. Just wondering coz we traded our 2013 crv with 39,000 kms on it and noticed that it just began to awesome on its 37k kms. Maybe it was just starting to break in. And we also can manage 9kms/liter on it, hardly making up to ten.
 

·
Everything in Moderation
Joined
·
7,625 Posts
Define 'long interstate highway trips' :D 5 miles? 100 miles? 63.7 miles? :p

Should be 'fully broken in' at around 200K miles. ;)
5 miles on a LONG interstate (as in Interstate 40, 10, or 80)? LOL!

Seriously, my rule of thumb is no more than 15 minutes at a constant speed (so no cruise control).

As Craig said, don't overthink it on new cars...they ain't the same as in the 1950s.


++++++++++++


PS, some folks think that engine break in totally after 20K miles, as the MPG seems to increase gradually as you approach that mileage. But IMO it's the wear on the tires...thinner, harder tires offer less rolling resistance than new soft tires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,592 Posts
Thanks for the inputs guys. I dont baby all my vehicles. I believe in the hard break ins. Just wondering coz we traded our 2013 crv with 39,000 kms on it and noticed that it just began to awesome on its 37k kms. Maybe it was just starting to break in. And we also can manage 9kms/liter on it, hardly making up to ten.
If you are saying to drive it when new using full acceleration, etc. that may not be the best for the engine. I always drive it moderately for the first 500 miles. No hard starts, no driving over the speed limits, and vary the cruising speeds while on the interstate highways. However, it's your new vehicle and you are entitled to drive it the way you want. Good Luck.
 

·
Everything in Moderation
Joined
·
7,625 Posts
While flogging a new engine isn't the best, there are valid reasons to exercise the engine over it's entire rev range when it is 'fresh'. If you Google 'engine break in' you get a variety of procedures and opinions.

Here's one from a Miata forum:

  1. The rings are the ONLY things we are interested in breaking in or seating [on a newly rebuilt engine]. What seats rings is cylinder pressure. Rings and pistons are designed so that cylinder pressure sneaks behind the compression rings and forces them out against the newly honed cylinder wall. Why do I mention this? Because I want you to take your warmed up car out on the road, find a nice straight stretch and do a couple of heavy throttle runs in third or fourth gear from about 2500-5500 rpm. Each time you hit 5500-6000 rpm, snap your foot off the gas and let the car coast down to 2500 rpm while in gear, to pull high vacuum in the cylinders. Repeat this step about five times and you should have a nicely mated set of rings and cylinders. NOTE: When I say “heavy throttle”, I am referring to a normally aspirated engine. For a turbo or supercharged car, modulate the throttle to achieve about zero on your boost gauge, rather than full throttle. This would be roughly equivalent to full throttle in a normally aspirated car.
  2. Take it home, recheck for leaks, make sure fans work, etc and then change the oil.
  3. Once you have done the ring seating, try to control yourself (or at least your right foot) for a few hundred miles, no full throttle, try to vary rpm on the highway and no revving to the limiter.
  4. That’s it! Have fun!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
776 Posts
We used to take our freshly built small block Chevy 305's right from the crate and run them maybe 5 minutes total before hitting the track !! Now these were blueprinted engines, but it was also 45 years ago. My personal opinion is the first 2-3 minutes of operation in the morning is the most important time of the day. For example, this AM it was -15 when I left home. It read +4 on the dash temp gauge when I pulled out of an unheated garage. After 1000' driveway, I'm going 40 - 55 for the next 8 miles into town. I never warm up a motor longer than 30 seconds tops but I do not exceed 2500 rpm's for at least several miles - maybe longer. These people who warm up an engine for 5-10 minutes are doing it no good at all IMO. One of the main byproducts of an internal combustion engine is water which settles in the exhaust system and works it's way into the pan as well. Common sense goes a long way. Craig
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
217 Posts
These people who warm up an engine for 5-10 minutes are doing it no good at all IMO. One of the main byproducts of an internal combustion engine is water which settles in the exhaust system and works it's way into the pan as well. Common sense goes a long way. Craig
I agree with you during warm weather. Here where I live, we warm up the car in the winter time because we don't want to enter our car at -30°c ~ -40°c and sit in a frozen seat. We also need to defrost the windshield/rear window before driving for safety reason. That's why many of us in this part of the country here have remote starters.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
776 Posts
I agree with you during warm weather. Here where I live, we warm up the car in the winter time because we don't want to enter our car at -30°c ~ -40°c and sit in a frozen seat. We also need to defrost the windshield/rear window before driving for safety reason. That's why many of us in this part of the country here have remote starters.
Given the "quality of OEM Honda batteries, how does it even turn over at those temps. Personally, I'd get a block/dipstick heater or even a light bulb just below the pan with a blanket over the engine before I'd let it idle that long every day, but that's just me. My '13 almost didn't start in an unheated garage when the temp was -15 2 days ago. Upon starting, the dash temp gauge showed +4 !! Go figure. Don't you get Chinook winds in Alberta ?? Nice, warm little updrafts that follow the Rockies Northward ??? Craig
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
579 Posts
Can't drive for 15 minutes at constant speed but letting it idle for 15 minutes? Idling is worse. Remote starters suck. Engines warm up in minutes when driving.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Going back to my original question. How many kilometers can you determine that your car has been fully broken in?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
If you are saying to drive it when new using full acceleration, etc. that may not be the best for the engine. I always drive it moderately for the first 500 miles. No hard starts, no driving over the speed limits, and vary the cruising speeds while on the interstate highways. However, it's your new vehicle and you are entitled to drive it the way you want. Good Luck.
Your insights are very good, but i am wondering if all the car manufacturer, s engine was already tested to run in various rpms etc before they even considering to mount it in cars. So, all our engines must have been tested bigtime. they wouldnt dare to put an engine to a car without testing the very engine only to find out thers no quality in them, just my thoughts. and way back in my younger years, i tested my car to a very same specked car only to find out that cars though very same allthroughout outruns another same car. even exchanging cars with their drivers. that other car will always outperform the other. the only reasoning we could think of is that the slower car was owned by an old doctor and surely we know his driving habits that the car was not allowed to be driven aggressively since new and the way it was broken in was kinda conservative.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
776 Posts
Ask 10 people this question and you'll get 11 different answers !! The World is crumbling around us as we speak and this occupies your thoughts ??? Just drive the car, it'll be fine. Craig
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Ask 10 people this question and you'll get 11 different answers !! The World is crumbling around us as we speak and this occupies your thoughts ??? Just drive the car, it'll be fine. Craig
yeah I agree, different answers from diffrent people. anyways, thanks for the insights and safe driving.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
783 Posts
Going back to my original question. How many kilometers can you determine that your car has been fully broken in?
I'd say the car is pretty broken-in by the 400km mark and essentially fully broken in around 2,000km. On a graph with break-in% on the vertical axis and miles on the horizontal, the line would climb steeply at first and gradually flatten.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top