Honda CR-V Owners Club Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey everybody. I over tighten my wheel lug nut while trying to rotate my tires after ~7k miles. Then I broke it. (I kept the broken lug nut (with the lug in it as a reminder of my error. )
So how much should I expect to pay to had it replaced? Is replacing a lug that a beginner can work on?
Thanks for checking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,974 Posts
What year of CRV do you have? Front, rear?

The wheel bearing/hub assembly may have to be removed to get the new stud in from the back side. A beginner may be able to change it, more info is needed though.

Using a torque wrench is preferred to tighten lug nuts, prevents the kind of issue you have. IIRC, 80 lb ft. is enough.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,256 Posts
From previous posts looks like the OP has a 2010 EX. But still need to know if AWD of FWD as there may be a difference if it's a rear.

80ft lbs. don't over tighten and make sure all are equally tightened. If not it can caused warped rotors up front if driven hard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
It is a 2010 crv exl 4wd. I broke the driver side front wheel lug.
So removing the wheel bearing and hub.. Can't easily access the lug. .
I was using the spare tire Jack and wrench. So I can't tell how much force I was using. It is all manual.
If I want to take the diy route, want to know what tools I need and pointers from you all if you did it in the past. I was starting to get discourage that I messed up my crv. I had doubt about the other wheels when that broke.
Thanks all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Guru for the link. No easy access to the lug. (I was hoping that i might get to the lug when i remove the rotor(?) cover).It looks like I will have to pass diy this time. I don't have the tools and I don't have the experience to mess with the brakes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I'll remember that Honda4life, 80ftlb. I'll look into buy'n a torque wrench. Heck, I should save up to get a decent set of tools if I want to learn to maintain my car. Right?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
346 Posts
My opinion is that you are more likely to break bolts with a torque wrench than without. Develop "mechanics feel" instead.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,974 Posts
I'll remember that Honda4life, 80ftlb. I'll look into buy'n a torque wrench. Heck, I should save up to get a decent set of tools if I want to learn to maintain my car. Right?
There are multiple things a torque wrench would be good for. If you were to DIY the lugs yourself, you would need to remove the hub/bearing assembly on the front, the CV shaft has to be freed from the hub, once the hub is back in place the nut on the end of the CV shaft has to be torqued to set the proper preload on the wheel bearings. I would have to look for the spec on the CRV but typically they are in the neighborhood of 180 lb ft.

Some parts stores have tool loaner programs, a deposit is left in exchange for the tool, which is refunded when the tool is returned.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Hi All, I took my crv to a shop. They replaced all 5 lugs. Well three were two were busted, one broke. That's three had to be replaced. So they did what a lot of people showed on youtube. Shaving it down, etc. So I think I is out of my ability to diy this time because that guy took like an hour to replace 5 lugs. It'll probably take mea year because I don't have the tools and I don't have prior experience. Total 85 plus tip.
Thanks for everyone's input. I appreciated.
Cheers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,095 Posts
Maybe not your fault...

...I over tighten my wheel lug nut while trying to rotate my tires after ~7k miles. Then I broke it.
I have checked lug torque after dealer and tire shop rotation and and found them tighter than 140 lbs!

I even watched the "Tire Guy" show me how he torqued them with a very expensive "Click" wrench." He pulled it until it clicked, then hogged on it a LOT more, looked up smiling saying See, it is tight!

No he is not an idiot, he just never was trained on how to use such an instrument. He thought the idea was to get it REALLY tight, having no idea that TOO tight is actually worse than not quite tight enough. And it took several times to get him to accept the notion that the nut MUST BE MOVING WHEN THE WRENCH CLICKS, and especially to accept that after ONE CLICK to STOP!

I have retorqued all 40 nuts on both my Hondas after being over tightened over 140 lbs. and they are still fine.

My guess is that someone before you over tightened the nuts with an extremely powerful air wrench without even a torque stick and damaged them?

About torque wrenches, yes an expensive "Click" wrench will be a bit more accurate, but, it has to be released and reset to the desired torque with each use, and that is just about impossible on a dark night in the rain, and the inaccuracy of a beam Style wrench is quite good enough. I put heavy lines on both sides with a permanent marker at the 80 lb mark to make it easy to tell when it is at 80 lbs. When you test a nut to see how tight it is, it will take 90 to 100 lbs to loosen it. If it is more than that it is WAY too tight. And all others are probably also. Loosen them one at a time and retorque them to 80 lbs. Tell tire guys to use 80 lbs. also.

I carry one in the car at all times and check them every time anyone tightens them.

To be safe, mainly to make sure some tire guy doesn't over tighten them, get yourself a very short 1/2" drive extension, and 17 MM deep socket, one of these, and keep them in the car:

TorqueWrench.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,974 Posts
If I am at the roadside at night in the rain changing a flat, I will be waiting until I get home to properly torque the lugs, through experience I have a real good feel for 80 lb ft. Most vehicles you are installing a temp spare, so it isn't like the spare will be on the vehicle long term.
I prefer a click type wrench because I can set and lock it, torque each lug to the click without having to get into a sight line position to see that the pointer is where it is required. If you are on the side of the road at night, seeing the pointer on a scale is a lot more difficult than feeling for a click.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,554 Posts
My opinion is that you are more likely to break bolts with a torque wrench than without. Develop "mechanics feel" instead.
I beg to differ with you Tom.
I used to use the 'mechanics feel' a lot in my younger days, but after working in the aerospace industry and working with some really sharp stress analysts, I feel this is bad advice. I don't know of any manufacturer that would give a torque value for a fastener that would end up breaking it if torqued to the spec called out. One thing I learned is that torque does matter on a bolt and too much can be more dangerous than not enough. Often times it doesn't take as much torque to accomplish the job as one would expect either.
bkyzworld - if you do get a torque wrench, be sure to google torque patterns for different patterns of bolt circles. They are just as important as the torque applied itself.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
346 Posts
I beg to differ with you Tom.
I used to use the 'mechanics feel' a lot in my younger days, but after working in the aerospace industry and working with some really sharp stress analysts, I feel this is bad advice. I don't know of any manufacturer that would give a torque value for a fastener that would end up breaking it if torqued to the spec called out. One thing I learned is that torque does matter on a bolt and too much can be more dangerous than not enough. Often times it doesn't take as much torque to accomplish the job as one would expect either.
bkyzworld - if you do get a torque wrench, be sure to google torque patterns for different patterns of bolt circles. They are just as important as the torque applied itself.
It's the wrenches I don't trust, not the torque specs or the need for proper torque. I never broke bolts until I started using torque wrenches about ten years ago, I own three. Now I'm back to the way I did it for the 50 years before that.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top