Honda CR-V Owners Club Forums banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
While inspecting a problem with the rear window wiper system, I attempted to check the use for that operation, and the top of the 10A fuse broke off, leaving the two prongs in the box. Suggestions as to how to remove them without damaging the box? The prongs don't appear visible upon inspection so they're in deep. Thank you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
While inspecting a problem with the rear window wiper system, I attempted to check the use for that operation, and the top of the 10A fuse broke off, leaving the two prongs in the box. Suggestions as to how to remove them without damaging the box? The prongs don't appear visible upon inspection so they're in deep. Thank you.
First Question: What systems are powered by this fuse? Because what I'm going to suggest is risky and if you can live without those systems, you might want to leave well enough alone.
First get a small, thin shaped spoon shaped tool; the far right in this picture.


You might need to modify the width of the tool to fit right alongside the broken fuse piece. The goal is to adapt the width and/or thickness of the tool so that it can be inserted alongside the broken blade of the fuse (if that's even possible, I don't know. Fuse blades have a snug fit) Apply a dab of epoxy to the tool piece and insert so that the epoxy bonds with the broken piece of fuse. Let it set overnight and the next day (hopefully) withdraw the tool with the fuse blade attached. The risk is that the epoxy might ruin the contact points or the tool become a permanent part of the fuse box.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Well, the first thing is to disconnect the neg batt cable as/while you figure this out. Maybe the box can be dismounted and flipped over, so that you can push out from the back end.
Thanks Bob. By habit, I always disconnect the battery before working on anything electrical. The interior fusebox is tucked up in the left hand corner and is difficult to reach. I had to remove the lower portion of the dashboard to get access.There is one obvious screw holding it in its cradle, but am not sure if there are any other screws, and I'm afraid to tug on it given it may end up causing other problems. It's fifteen years old at this point.

And if you get this fixed please let us know the process. If it is the fuse box inside the car that is just horrible to access. Almost looks like the whole dash needs to be removed.
Lower portion of the dash is held in place by approx. five pressure clips and two hooks that fold the panel forward. There is a fuse box diagram plate that needs to be removed first, it has a twist lock button on the left and an insert type tip that inserts at the right end. It's a bit of a tricky mess at first to deal with, and given the plastic is old, gentle care is needed upon removal. I've read others have broken some of these parts by not teasing them out. I used a mirror underneath the dash to try and get an idea of what the system looked like. Regardless, after removal of these items, the access to the fuse box is much better, however being left handed makes it hard enough to work on some aspects of this project.

I'd be removing the battery as stated and buying a set of picks

Yes, I did disconnect the battery and bought a few different sets of picks, tweezers, surgical equipment items, etc. The problem with the minifuses is the slots are so small, and deep, that getting in the slots with even the finest of tools is problematic given the slots design (plastic walls with copper grips that hold the fuse in place and conduct the electrical charge). The probes (tiny tweezers, picks, etc.), even the thinnest ones, are dealing with a workspace that has walls on either side designed to hold the fuse firmly in place, so to try and expand the wall, my concern is can this be done without permanent damage (affecting the slot to hold the replacement fuse in place or impact the conductivity of the copper contacts). I'd like to know if there are any dealership mechanics who can answer these questions and how they do it. This has to be a somewhat common problem overtime. If the fusebox has to come out and then attempt to push the broken prongs from the rear, as to avoid damage, that would be helpful. To replace the fusebox cost wise, is quite expensive from what I can tell, and if its not reconnected correctly, I suppose other problems can arise.

First Question: What systems are powered by this fuse? Because what I'm going to suggest is risky and if you can live without those systems, you might want to leave well enough alone.
First get a small, thin shaped spoon shaped tool; the far right in this picture.


You might need to modify the width of the tool to fit right alongside the broken fuse piece. The goal is to adapt the width and/or thickness of the tool so that it can be inserted alongside the broken blade of the fuse (if that's even possible, I don't know. Fuse blades have a snug fit) Apply a dab of epoxy to the tool piece and insert so that the epoxy bonds with the broken piece of fuse. Let it set overnight and the next day (hopefully) withdraw the tool with the fuse blade attached. The risk is that the epoxy might ruin the contact points or the tool become a permanent part of the fuse box.
The item affected is the rear window wiper system. Not a necessary system per se, but my wife would disagree (her car). Your suggestion is a good one, however, again, given the slot's width is extremely tight, and deep (I can't even see the broken off prongs in these slots) I would expect that I would end up with the risk you mentioned in your last sentence. In that event, the fuse box would probably have to be replaced I would think, if it was necessary to have that rear window wiper system work.
 

·
Registered
03 CRV
Joined
·
912 Posts
That sucks. Good luck with whatever you try.

I would probably get a new fuse box. If memory serves, this generation CRV may need it programmed after installation. Afterwards, consider using a test light or power probe to test fuses.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Thanks Bob. By habit, I always disconnect the battery before working on anything electrical. The interior fusebox is tucked up in the left hand corner and is difficult to reach. I had to remove the lower portion of the dashboard to get access.There is one obvious screw holding it in its cradle, but am not sure if there are any other screws, and I'm afraid to tug on it given it may end up causing other problems. It's fifteen years old at this point.


Lower portion of the dash is held in place by approx. five pressure clips and two hooks that fold the panel forward. There is a fuse box diagram plate that needs to be removed first, it has a twist lock button on the left and an insert type tip that inserts at the right end. It's a bit of a tricky mess at first to deal with, and given the plastic is old, gentle care is needed upon removal. I've read others have broken some of these parts by not teasing them out. I used a mirror underneath the dash to try and get an idea of what the system looked like. Regardless, after removal of these items, the access to the fuse box is much better, however being left handed makes it hard enough to work on some aspects of this project.


Yes, I did disconnect the battery and bought a few different sets of picks, tweezers, surgical equipment items, etc. The problem with the minifuses is the slots are so small, and deep, that getting in the slots with even the finest of tools is problematic given the slots design (plastic walls with copper grips that hold the fuse in place and conduct the electrical charge). The probes (tiny tweezers, picks, etc.), even the thinnest ones, are dealing with a workspace that has walls on either side designed to hold the fuse firmly in place, so to try and expand the wall, my concern is can this be done without permanent damage (affecting the slot to hold the replacement fuse in place or impact the conductivity of the copper contacts). I'd like to know if there are any dealership mechanics who can answer these questions and how they do it. This has to be a somewhat common problem overtime. If the fusebox has to come out and then attempt to push the broken prongs from the rear, as to avoid damage, that would be helpful. To replace the fusebox cost wise, is quite expensive from what I can tell, and if its not reconnected correctly, I suppose other problems can arise.



The item affected is the rear window wiper system. Not a necessary system per se, but my wife would disagree (her car). Your suggestion is a good one, however, again, given the slot's width is extremely tight, and deep (I can't even see the broken off prongs in these slots) I would expect that I would end up with the risk you mentioned in your last sentence. In that event, the fuse box would probably have to be replaced I would think, if it was necessary to have that rear window wiper system work.
I think in the long run you could wash the rear window by hand weekly for 5 years and come out ahead in terms of time, money and frustration! 😂
 

·
Registered
2016 CRV Touring AWD sold
Joined
·
4,163 Posts
Agree with those suggesting you remove the fuse box.

With access to the other side hopefully you can remove that broken tip.
 

·
Registered
2011 CRV ES-T I-DTEC
Joined
·
84 Posts
That sucks. Good luck with whatever you try.

I would probably get a new fuse box. If memory serves, this generation CRV may need it programmed after installation. Afterwards, consider using a test light or power probe to test fuses.
I would do this. I bought one when mine melted, the cost for an auto electrician to install and program if you will was negligible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
You could disconnect the wire going to the rear wiper, splice in an inline fuse holder, and run the other end to ignition power somewhere. That would bypass the broken fuse holder and would be a LOT cheaper than buying a new fuse box.
My level is fuse box electronics 101; attempting what appears to be a simple procedure may cause more anxiety than I'm willing to deal with. Yep a lot cheaper for sure, depending where you look online, a new fuse box is 500-800 bucks. What a ripoff, but then again, most car parts are.....

And lets all hope this is a very rare deal. I sure would not care to deal with it. I would bet its a 1000 dollar fix at a dealer.
Yep, I;d rather go without the rear window wiper than go to a dealer for this issue.

I would do this. I bought one when mine melted, the cost for an auto electrician to install and program if you will was negligible.
Really? The new fuse box online was anywhere from 500-800 bucks, it included all the fuses too, but a junk yard fuse box would probably make more sense.

One way is to make the tips on the needle nose pliers bent
That way the pliers are eating into the fuse
This should give better grip on the fuse
Yes, however the problem is not the fuse, it's the remainder parts (the two prongs) that broke off deep in the slot of the box. I do have bent needle nose pliers, tweezers, etc. which I've attempted to use but I'm really trying to avoid damaging the walls of the slot in attempting to pull the prongs out.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top