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Discussion Starter #1
My daughter just lost the timing belt on her 99 CRV. She was at idle when it happened. What are the chances of bent valves? She is trying to decide if she should go ahead with the repair. $450 for a new belt and test by hand rotating. $500 more if no bent valves to handle water pump,idler and whatever. $900 more for valves if needed. Looking for quick response as she has to decide soon what to do. Thanks in advance for any and all opinions.
 

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If it truly happened at idle you should be in luck andnot have to worry about bent valves. If I was in your position I would go ahead and do the pump and tensioner at the same time as the beltm why pay to do what amounts to the same job twice.As as dealer ship people would be all over is for trying to rip you off if we suggested two. Separate repairs.
 

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I would move forward if the vehicle is in good condition otherwise. I am curious, how did the belt break? Was she over the proper interval for a timing belt replacement (every 105k)?
 

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To state the obvious, IMHO, before doing anything else, you need to determine if any of the valves were bent when the timing belt broke. If they are bent and you are going to have to replace one or more, removing the cylinder head will include the work required to replace the timing belt, and when that's being done, as Lizzard said, it only makes sense to replace the water pump at the same time.

The obvious problem, of course, is how to determine if the valves were bent when the timing belt is broken. It will take some additional effort to do this, but again, it should be done in my opinion before you attempt to replace the timing belt. The question is how to determine if the valves are bent.

One way is to remove the spark plugs and bring each cylinder to top-dead-center, one at a time, manually. There are several ways to do this, but the easiest would be by using a socket and breaker bar on the nut on the crank pulley to rotate the crankshaft. Then, with the valve cover removed, turn the camshafts manually (here again, any number of ways) until the valves are closed (or should be closed) on the cylinder(s) you want to check. Then pressurize the cylinders one at a time -- a leak-down test, in other words. If you discover you can't pressurize one or more of the cylinders, you know you have to remove the head. On the other hand, if you've got good compression, you can move on to replacing the timing belt and the water pump.

IMHO, there's not that much more labor involved in doing a leak-down test first, and doing that will end the guess work.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Will unfortunately, valves were determined to be bent and now going ahead with the repair. I do not believe the belt had been replaced as required. The pump and all will be replaced. Thanks for the feedback.
 
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