Honda CR-V Owners Club Forums banner

1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
163 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone know the location and have instructions on how to change this out? The owners manual says to have this done by the dealer but in most cases this should be able to be done by a DIY'er. I know older hondas you simply pop out the glove box and it's right there. Is that the location on the 17 CRV's?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,661 Posts
Yes. I just looked. Unlatch the box by pushing down on the support rod on the right at the end that goes into the glovebox door. (You'll feel a little grippy dip near the end of the rod.) Squeeze the top rear of the box to release the catches from the frame and let the box drop. You'll now be staring at the cabin filter access panel.

I find it hilarious that they give you complete oil change instructions, but tell you that the cabin filter is dealer-only. I can only imagine how much they'd charge for this!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,661 Posts
Dealers in my area charge $99 - with coupon!
That shows some real chutzpah; I think it might have taken me three minutes (with no instructions) to do this, and the part is all of $20 or so. (if you aren't paying dealership-extortion prices for that too.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
679 Posts
Dealers are thieves, they are absolute thieves. The best innovation from Tesla is the dealing with consumers directly - something that Honda likely will never do as they don't care about their customers one bit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,592 Posts
Check RockAuto.com for the cabin filters. I buy their least expensive and change them myself. Hey, its not rocket science. Look the change-out up on YouTube. I suppose if you have deep pockets and are afraid of doing anything easy for yourself you'll stay happy giving the dealer lots of money for next to doing nothing. .......anyway, that's my two cents worth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,661 Posts
Dealers are thieves, they are absolute thieves. The best innovation from Tesla is the dealing with consumers directly - something that Honda likely will never do as they don't care about their customers one bit.
Most manufacturers would like very much to deal with consumers directly. However, state dealer franchising laws prohibit this. (This, incidentally, is why you can't buy a Tesla at a Tesla dealership in most states. Everything is a factory order that you must place online and then wait for your manufacturing date to roll around.)

And, if you hate Honda so much, why on earth did you just buy one? It's not as if there are no alternatives.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,310 Posts
Note that the filters used in the gen 4 CRV's are larger than the 2017's filters. So gen 4 filters will not fit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,661 Posts
Those filters are unlikely to filter particulates any better than pleated filters, and for volatile contaminants (which carbon can theoretically filter) will quickly become saturated. (There's a reason commercial air filters, even for places like hospitals, don't use carbon; there's just no point.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
548 Posts
Those filters are unlikely to filter particulates any better than pleated filters, and for volatile contaminants (which carbon can theoretically filter) will quickly become saturated. (There's a reason commercial air filters, even for places like hospitals, don't use carbon; there's just no point.)
I sent an email to an old workmate of mine that works at Airport here in Australia, he is a Mechanic/Air Conditioning Mechanic he maintains the Terminal A/C Plant there and also maintains the companies vehicles, here is his reply:

Carbon filters are used widely around the globe in a number of different applications.

The carbon filter works harder hence has a shorter life span, this depends on the environment you are in.

Heavy everyday traffic may contribute to short life by reducing amount of hydrocarbons entering cabin from other vehicles.

They will remove odours as well and effectively.

In around 1973 they introduced the charcoal filters to the fuel systems on the cars to reduce odours and vapours.



You need to keep the cabin filter clean and ensure it seals up against housing tightly .

If not you will get extra grime build up on evaporator of air conditioning which reduces cooling output and is expensive to clean.

Sometimes it is cheaper to replace the evaporator if it becomes blocked with grime.



A blocked or reduced air flow cabin filter may cause air conditioning evaporator to short cycle, reducing cooling output.



You need to see if you can find flow rate for both filters to ensure one is not more restrictive than the manufacturers supplied one.

This may be in CFM / Ft/sec, m/sec, or pascal drop, Etc.

Pascal difference is usually what Australian Standards measure.
From my mates reply the paper filter is still the way to go, however, we need to make sure that the flow rate is equal too the OEM type. Now how we find that out will take a little detective work and Mr Google. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
203 Posts
I sent an email to an old workmate of mine that works at Airport here in Australia, he is a Mechanic/Air Conditioning Mechanic he maintains the Terminal A/C Plant there and also maintains the companies vehicles, here is his reply:



From my mates reply the paper filter is still the way to go, however, we need to make sure that the flow rate is equal too the OEM type. Now how we find that out will take a little detective work and Mr Google. :D
Well, maybe if you go with the cheapest aftermarket you find it may well be the least dense (to save money). Putting the least strain on the evaporator. Or just replace it once a year with the Honda filter from a discount source, if in doubt. I can't see loading up a cabin filter that bad unless you frequent particularly dusty or sandy environs. Then change it more often, along with the engine air filter which would be a bigger concern to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
For a 2017 touring, I went to get a cabin filter and all the non Honda brands are to long. The non Honda brands (Fram, Wix etc) haven't caught up with the new redesign on producing the new size. Especially since this is for a 15k mile change.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
I usually get the cabin filters from Advanced Auto Parts and use their brand. You can also order the genuine Honda filter from College Hills Honda on-line at a discounted price. They sell the cabin filter for $24.52 and the air filter for $15.78.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top