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Can I disable Collision Mitigation Braking System & Road Departure Mitigation System

Is it possible to turn off/disable the Collision Mitigation Braking System & Road Departure Mitigation System?
 

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Yes, it is possible to turn it off.

I intend to turn off the collision mitigation system before I get in my CR-V again.

Yesterday, I’m driving around 35 miles per hour when the road surface abruptly changed. That caused the vehicle to slam on the brakes. Fortunately nobody was tailing me, but I won’t let that happen again. Truly a terrifying experience.
 

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Hi

That's scary, I've only had mine for a week and not seen any issues but now I'm going to be very careful until I understand what it's doing.
There is a button on the steering wheel that turns the road departure system on.

I don't know yet about the auto braking thing.

This is kind of like future shock, I bought my last Honda in 2004, and it's a whole new world.
 

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I wish you could edit your answers at least for 5 minutes of so, I always see mistakes after I push the Post button.
Like repeating On the steering wheel. LOL
 

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Hi

That's scary, I've only had mine for a week and not seen any issues but now I'm going to be very careful until I understand what it's doing.
There is a button on the stirring wheel that turns the road departure system on the steering wheel.

I don't know yet about the auto braking thing.

This is kind of like future shock, I bought my last Honda in 2004, and it's a whole new world.
The buttons to disable CMBS and RDMS are on the lower left side of the dash and not on the steering wheel.
 

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I wish you could edit your answers at least for 5 minutes of so, I always see mistakes after I push the Post button.
Like repeating On the steering wheel. LOL
Once you get a few more posts under your belt, I think that you have to have 10, you'll be able to edit your shoddy...er, earlier posts. :p
 

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This is kind of like future shock, I bought my last Honda in 2004, and it's a whole new world.
Tell me about it. My 2005 had Cassette player and CD Changers,now I have bt/Ipod/pandora/XM/CM/ACC/CM/Voice recognition. Only VR system in my 2005 was the wife and kids.....

PS fixed your post Mike!
 

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Yes, it is possible to turn it off.

I intend to turn off the collision mitigation system before I get in my CR-V again.

Yesterday, I’m driving around 35 miles per hour when the road surface abruptly changed. That caused the vehicle to slam on the brakes. Fortunately nobody was tailing me, but I won’t let that happen again. Truly a terrifying experience.
So this was change in surface that caused my Honda to slam on the brakes.

4-26-17-BrakeSM.jpg
 

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obviously its not perfect, but don't everyone get excited and commit over reaction and shut all of this amazing safety equipment off. I'm guessing it will potentially save you 1000 fold over hurting you.. BTW if anyone EVER rear ends you no matter how hard or how fast you have brakes slammed on and for any reason its their fault... FACT....... (following to close) OBVIOUSLY none of us wants this to happen.............

good luck
 

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obviously its not perfect, but don't everyone get excited and commit over reaction and shut all of this amazing safety equipment off. I'm guessing it will potentially save you 1000 fold over hurting you.. BTW if anyone EVER rear ends you no matter how hard or how fast you have brakes slammed on and for any reason its their fault... FACT....... (following to close) OBVIOUSLY none of us wants this to happen.............

good luck
Quite possibly.

For me, it was alarming and I'm thankful somebody wasn't behind me. It's cold comfort that it's somebody else' fault whilst I still have spinal damage and pain for life.

Full disclosure, here's the official response:

Dear Yoda,

We are so sorry to hear that you had a frightening experience with the Collision Mitigation Braking System (CMBS) feature. We appreciate the time you took to notify us of your experience and are happy to hear that you are safe. We were able to confirm with the owner's manual that this feature may automatically come on during certain roadway conditions. They include driving over speed bumps, steel road plates, train tracks or roadside objects on a curb or nearby. Additional detailed information about CMBS may be reviewed by visiting pg. 516 on http://owners.honda.com/vehicles/information/2017/CR-V/manuals. We recommend having the vehicle inspected at your local Honda dealership to ensure that the system is working properly for your safety.

We welcome you to contact us with any additional comments or questions. Our Honda Automobile Customer Service team can also be reached by calling #800-999-1009, option #7 or on Twitter @HondaCustSvc.

Kind regards,


Honda Automobile Customer Service
Case #05981052



So as I like to say, forewarned is four-armed. I'm keeping my system off.

Makes me a lot less eager to see self-driving cars go mainstream, I'll tell you that.
 

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:" It's cold comfort that it's somebody else' fault whilst I still have spinal damage and pain for life."
little experience with new vehicles, accidents or seatbelts eh?

GOOD LUCK. Hope it all works out for you......
 

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I can understand the shock of having your car suddenly brake. At the same time I also know that after several months of driving this new CR-V I feel a little less secure in a car without these systems.

No system is perfect, Honda spells that out quite clearly in their manual. But after several thousands of miles in my new V and having had the warning system help me out a couple of times already I am leaving it on and will never buy another car without it.

I use to teach the safety systems classes at GM. GM had the largest amount of crash data in the industry as they had put data recorders in the cars for some time. (unknown to the public back then) The data helped GM further develop the systems and also protected them in a law suit. From that data they learned about crashes and how well the systems were working. They also knew, and told the NTSB, about the limitations of safety systems. None can be perfect any more than you can be a perfect driver.

One fact that is PROVEN by the data we now have is that cars with these safety systems are safer and you are more likely to avoid an accident or be hurt less in one with them. Its like seat belts. So many refused to wear them saying they "might get trapped in the car". Well the data shows you are vastly more likely to get tossed out of the car and seriously injured without them.

Turn your safety equipment off if you want, its your right. But, and the data is overwhelming, you are vastly safer in a car with these systems. In fact you are so much safer that the NTSB has worked with auto makers to have these systems in all cars sold by 2022. The numbers done lie. Read this little piece from NPR:

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/03/17/470809148/automatic-braking-systems-to-become-standard-on-most-u-s-vehicles

And a bit more here, some examples of human compared to the machine and some info about "false positives":

http://www.freep.com/story/money/cars/mark-phelan/2016/01/01/automatic-braking-safety-pedestrian-detection-nhtsa-iihs/78029322/
 

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I can understand the shock of having your car suddenly brake. At the same time I also know that after several months of driving this new CR-V I feel a little less secure in a car without these systems.

No system is perfect, Honda spells that out quite clearly in their manual. But after several thousands of miles in my new V and having had the warning system help me out a couple of times already I am leaving it on and will never buy another car without it.

I use to teach the safety systems classes at GM. GM had the largest amount of crash data in the industry as they had put data recorders in the cars for some time. (unknown to the public back then) The data helped GM further develop the systems and also protected them in a law suit. From that data they learned about crashes and how well the systems were working. They also knew, and told the NTSB, about the limitations of safety systems. None can be perfect any more than you can be a perfect driver.

One fact that is PROVEN by the data we now have is that cars with these safety systems are safer and you are more likely to avoid an accident or be hurt less in one with them. Its like seat belts. So many refused to wear them saying they "might get trapped in the car". Well the data shows you are vastly more likely to get tossed out of the car and seriously injured without them.

Turn your safety equipment off if you want, its your right. But, and the data is overwhelming, you are vastly safer in a car with these systems. In fact you are so much safer that the NTSB has worked with auto makers to have these systems in all cars sold by 2022. The numbers done lie. Read this little piece from NPR:
]
I beg to differ with your herd mentality post. My nephew is a high ranking engineer in the Product Development department of a major car manufacturer that isn't GM or Ford. First, there are no NUMBERS (just hype) in either of the links you provided, so the members of this forum should be aware of this. My nephew has already come close to being in a serious accident as a direct result of the braking system in one of their cars and it happened while he was changing lanes (or trying to) in traffic while going faster than 50mph. He is an expert in his field and he is advising me to buy a car NOW because all this stuff become mandatory. The Lane Departure is simply harassment but the braking can get you killed, plain and simple. They are considering options now for performance cars to have something like a 'Track Mode' that would disable all the automatic AI systems, and they are trying to determine if it would be automakers fault if owner were to put car in 'track mode' while on normal highway. All of this is a PUSH by government to push us toward self driving cars whose whereabouts will always be known and where the owner gives up a lot of freedom. My nephew says that all the car manufacturers are NOT happy about it and are complaining, but or being forced by laws passed by all-knowing politicians and that there are NO NUMBERS that reflect what is going to happen when you mix cars with AI systems together with cars that don't have AI systems. He is predicting that accidents will shoot UP and people will get hurt before maybe the politicians and bureaucrats will back down. He told me also that many cars allow you to disable to systems ONLY until you turn the key off, so you would have to disable the AI every time you start the car! I'm looking at a CRV now, but haven't purchased it yet because I'm trying to verify 100% of the systems can be semi-permanently disabled before I purchase.
 

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I beg to differ with your herd mentality post. My nephew is a high ranking engineer in the Product Development department of a major car manufacturer that isn't GM or Ford. First, there are no NUMBERS (just hype) in either of the links you provided, so the members of this forum should be aware of this. My nephew has already come close to being in a serious accident as a direct result of the braking system in one of their cars and it happened while he was changing lanes (or trying to) in traffic while going faster than 50mph. He is an expert in his field and he is advising me to buy a car NOW because all this stuff become mandatory. The Lane Departure is simply harassment but the braking can get you killed, plain and simple. They are considering options now for performance cars to have something like a 'Track Mode' that would disable all the automatic AI systems, and they are trying to determine if it would be automakers fault if owner were to put car in 'track mode' while on normal highway. All of this is a PUSH by government to push us toward self driving cars whose whereabouts will always be known and where the owner gives up a lot of freedom. My nephew says that all the car manufacturers are NOT happy about it and are complaining, but or being forced by laws passed by all-knowing politicians and that there are NO NUMBERS that reflect what is going to happen when you mix cars with AI systems together with cars that don't have AI systems. He is predicting that accidents will shoot UP and people will get hurt before maybe the politicians and bureaucrats will back down. He told me also that many cars allow you to disable to systems ONLY until you turn the key off, so you would have to disable the AI every time you start the car! I'm looking at a CRV now, but haven't purchased it yet because I'm trying to verify 100% of the systems can be semi-permanently disabled before I purchase.
I am happy your nephew works in the field, as did I.

If you want to buy a car without advanced safety systems I would recommend you buy soon as all car makers are adding these to over 90% of their models due to the increased safety they offer.

You stated I did not link to anything with hard data. Well, my links were to quick and easy reads. Most people get pretty bored reading the long documents about this. But, just so you know, and so that others that read this know, there is a good deal of published data on this with hard numbers. Some of the reports are long and filled with boring stuff but just to set the record straight I have attached two links to one of the brief 63 page reports from the NTSB with some of their information based on their extensive studies and another paper which contains some of the hard numbers obtained by their studies and analysis. As a working professional I spent many hours reading through all of this. To the average reader most of it may be boring but the numbers are in there for one who takes the time to read through it.

And, I will bet you a steak dinner that within a couple of years you will not even be able to buy a car without these systems. Just as some didn't want air bags or stability systems or back up cameras, once the pubic has a taste of the increased safety of cars with these systems they will avoid buying anything without them. This is based on personal professional experience, not personal opinions. But, from first hand experience I can state without a doubt that these systems have helped me avoid some possible accidents. I can also state that the NTSB has considered and have publicly discussed the "false positives" that can happen with any such system but feel the positive effects in avoiding the high number of rear end collisions greatly outweigh the rare false activation. Its a free country and currently you are allowed to place yourself in greater danger. (and possibly further burden our already overworked health care system) just like the people who refuse to wear motorcycle helmets.

https://www.ntsb.gov/safety/safety-studies/Documents/SIR1501.pdf

https://static.nhtsa.gov/odi/inv/2016/INCLA-PE16007-7876.pdf
 

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I disabled RDMS after it activated when I had to quickly change lanes to avoid a vehicle that cut me off. The unexpected steering wheel torque and vibrations surprised me and could have been dangerous. Since these type of maneuvers are required fairly commonly in the heavily trafficked SoCal area, the last thing I need is a "safety" system injecting further distractions.

I have CMBS set to the "short" setting as I modulate my braking effort according to the situation to prevent being rear-ended. On the "normal" setting it too frequently interpreted my modulation as insufficient and activated when completely unnecessary. Experiences such as Yoda Mann's are worrisome and I'm considering turning it off completely.

The fact that any impairment (weather, dirt, worn lane marking, etc.) to the camera can degrade or negate these safety systems when drivers have become dependent on their functionality is very troubling IMHO.
 

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The fact that any impairment (weather, dirt, worn lane marking, etc.) to the camera can degrade or negate these safety systems when drivers have become dependent on their functionality is very troubling IMHO.
Honda (and all car makers) make it 100% perfectly clear that safety systems are aides, not replacements, for good driving habits and attention. Its made very clear that the driver should not depend on these systems, that they are helpers, not masters. True some drivers may feel they can lower their attention if their cars have these, but I am betting those are in the minority. They are wrong to think that way. At the same time any safety assistance the car can offer to protect us is a good thing.

Many years ago when I was a newer pilot electronic flight computers were just beginning to become available. Many of the old pilots scoffed at people using these saying that their batteries might go dead and leave them stranded, etc. Same think happened when we began using GPS in planes. The old guys swore people would forget how to navigate. Well, it didn't happen. The electronic aides were just that, aides. We still have paper maps and know how to read them. We just have some nice helper tools to make things easier. When doing flight reviews its common practice for the instructor to turn off some of your instruments and see how you can work without them should they fail.

I watched a lady nearly crash her brand new RAV-4 last week. On a straight road, 35 MPH speed limit, middle of the day she slowly drifted over the center line and the truck coming the other way was barely able to get out of her way and avoid a head on collision. She was distracted for a few seconds, at a bad time. A crying child? A cell phone? Dropped something? Who knows. One things is certain however, a momentary distraction can happen to all of us and we can die or be seriously injured faster than you can blink an eye.

I am a great driver, proven by decades of a perfect driving record. Even so I am human and as such I can make a mistake. If my car can help me in that moment to help avoid an accident or lessen its impact its a good thing. Turn off your safety systems if you want, its your call. But numbers don't lie and the data shows its perfectly clear that over all you are much safer with those systems no matter how good a driver you think you are.
 

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Honda (and all car makers) make it 100% perfectly clear that safety systems are aides, not replacements, for good driving habits and attention. Its made very clear that the driver should not depend on these systems, that they are helpers, not masters. True some drivers may feel they can lower their attention if their cars have these, but I am betting those are in the minority. They are wrong to think that way. At the same time any safety assistance the car can offer to protect us is a good thing.

Many years ago when I was a newer pilot electronic flight computers were just beginning to become available. Many of the old pilots scoffed at people using these saying that their batteries might go dead and leave them stranded, etc. Same think happened when we began using GPS in planes. The old guys swore people would forget how to navigate. Well, it didn't happen. The electronic aides were just that, aides. We still have paper maps and know how to read them. We just have some nice helper tools to make things easier. When doing flight reviews its common practice for the instructor to turn off some of your instruments and see how you can work without them should they fail.

I watched a lady nearly crash her brand new RAV-4 last week. On a straight road, 35 MPH speed limit, middle of the day she slowly drifted over the center line and the truck coming the other way was barely able to get out of her way and avoid a head on collision. She was distracted for a few seconds, at a bad time. A crying child? A cell phone? Dropped something? Who knows. One things is certain however, a momentary distraction can happen to all of us and we can die or be seriously injured faster than you can blink an eye.

I am a great driver, proven by decades of a perfect driving record. Even so I am human and as such I can make a mistake. If my car can help me in that moment to help avoid an accident or lessen its impact its a good thing. Turn off your safety systems if you want, its your call. But numbers don't lie and the data shows its perfectly clear that over all you are much safer with those systems no matter how good a driver you think you are.
You make some good points (as you always do I might add), but my driving experience (50 years in SoCal), education (graduate degree in Psychology), and profession (30+ years in IT Data Center Mgmt) lead me to believe that a large percentage of drivers will quickly take these safety systems for granted and rely on them without heeding or remembering any manufacturer disclaimers. I've also seen first-hand, the routine frequency of technology system & software failures despite rigorous pretesting and vendor data sheet claims, and have in fact already experienced this with my CR-V.

I also consider myself an excellent driver, but after my experiences with RDMS & CMBS, I'm convinced they do not make me safer and in fact make me less safe by distracting me from utilizing the driving technique that I've honed over decades of experience. That being said, I do feel many less experienced drivers, and those who are drive only in the sense they are behind the wheel (texting or distracted in myriad ways), will benefit from these safety systems. Will they be safe drivers? I hope for all our sake they'll be less dangerous.
 

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I also consider myself an excellent driver, but after my experiences with RDMS & CMBS, I'm convinced they do not make me safer and in fact make me less safe by distracting me from utilizing the driving technique that I've honed over decades of experience. That being said, I do feel many less experienced drivers, and those who are drive only in the sense they are behind the wheel (texting or distracted in myriad ways), will benefit from these safety systems. Will they be safe drivers? I hope for all our sake they'll be less dangerous.
Your experiences with these systems are just that, your experiences. The systems do NOT make you less safe, you being distracted by them could, but that is on you, not the car's fault. You are just one person out of the millions that now have these systems on their vehicles. I am sure there are others who feel as you do, but the vast majority do not.

I started driving cars in in 1963 and since that time had one minor accident. That one boo-boo was my fault, coming home from a late night of work during finals week when I was in college and just dead tired. I slowly drifted off the road, something that my new car would not have allowed without at least warning me.

One of my jobs at GM was working with on-board safety systems and training field people on their operation and service. GM had compiled a ton of research data dating back to the 1960's. The NTSB has done many studies on vehicles and safety systems and are convinced by the data that they work and work well. As I have said before I think I have heard about every possible complaint about new technology in automobiles leading to problems. Heck, Henry Ford refused to put hydraulic brakes on his car for the longest time as he was convinced that they would leak out the fluid and not stop the car. He swore his cable operated brakes (which were terrible and required constant maintenance and adjustment and would never stop in a straight line) were the only system that was safe. Of course Ford thought the Model T was the most perfect car one could ever build and he nearly went out of business as he resisted change.


So while you feel you understand the human mind I also have a few years experience dealing with humans as they relate to automobiles and safety systems. I have also spent a lot of hours going over studies, statistics, NTSB reports, SAE papers, etc. on these subjects. The data is quite clear; while no system is ever going to be 100% perfect in each and every situation we have to consider the whole picture and put our money and efforts where we can get the best return for the greatest number of people. The data paints a very clear picture, the new safety systems that we are seeing make cars safer. Meanwhile, you can turn yours off. But, you are my age and I would suggest the older you get the more these things might help you. Hardly a week goes by when my trusty Honda doesn't beep (or more) at me, usually when someone cuts in front of me or suddenly stops very quickly for no apparent reason.
 
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