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I was wondering if I could turn off the simulated gears on the CVT transmission on the Honda CRV 2016. I would love to try a more efficient scheme of shifting, continuously, instead of quantized into simulated gears like the Honda crv currently is. Is it an option? Hidden option? Would love to try it
 

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A CVT doesnt have separate gears like a standard automatic. Actually nothing like a standard automatic in anyway.

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Tigris99 - I think the original poster knows that. What he doesn't like is the programmed 'shift' simulation that the CVT exhibits. By programming it to do that, Honda has taken the 'continuous' out of the 'CVT' so to speak.

Personally, I hate how they work as they are doomed to failure IMO, based on the way they do what they do. I can fully understand the reasoning for using them, but that doesn't mean I have to like them.
 

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It may be your driving style rocky. Putting your foot into it will probably allow you to 'feel' the simulation better.
 

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I put it down periodically. Heck how many of us wind their cars to 6500?
Actually I think it's running more nicely today than when new.
 

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I'm with you, not a fan of them either. I like my gears lol.
Tigris99 - I think the original poster knows that. What he doesn't like is the programmed 'shift' simulation that the CVT exhibits. By programming it to do that, Honda has taken the 'continuous' out of the 'CVT' so to speak.

Personally, I hate how they work as they are doomed to failure IMO, based on the way they do what they do. I can fully understand the reasoning for using them, but that doesn't mean I have to like them.
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I don't feel any simulated shift points on my16

Don't feel any shift points on our '17 either. Light/moderate acceleration, rpm holds in the 1500 to 2000 range and the car accelerates. Push the go pedal a little harder and rpms go up and the car accelerates quicker. Tranny is smooth as silk.
 

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I'm going to have to check this out as well. I have a '16 and I can't say that in the 6 months of ownership I've noticed any shift points either!
 

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I put it down periodically. Heck how many of us wind their cars to 6500?
Actually I think it's running more nicely today than when new.
For what it's worth, I try to get it up into the upper reaches of the RPM range just about every time I drive it without my wife in the car. Getting on the freeway I've found it shifts at @6800 rpm like clock work.
The only reason I do this is because of the amount of time the engine spends below 3k rpm. In an emergency, I want to know it's going to respond if needed.
With 32k on it now, I'd say ours runs better than when it was new too. Having the big battery in it now seems to have helped too, as all the sensors are seeing the correct voltage now, all the time. I honestly don't think they were with the original battery.
 

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I'm going to have to check this out as well. I have a '16 and I can't say that in the 6 months of ownership I've noticed any shift points either!
Look at your tach - if it jumps rpm it is simulating shifts - a real cvt slowly changes rpm as speeds change not jumping.
 

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Not sure I agree with you on that larryr.
When I drove my daughter's '13 Accord, the CVT would allow the rpm of the engine to come up to what the throttle position called for, and then it would slowly increase the speed to match said throttle position.
Remember, the whole idea behind a CVT is keep engine speed constant (for better mileage) while varying the speed of the vehicle (to match the throttle position).
If you step down hard on the gas pedal, the rpm will jump up, but the speed of the vehicle doesn't until the trans gets it going, which will be in an even curve of loading the engine so it can maintain the throttle position speed called for.
 

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I was not talking about stepping on the gas pedal - driving up and down hills at the same speed - the tach should slowly increase or decrease - instead it jumps like a 5 speed transmission does.
 

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It wont change slowly if the load changes drastically quickly. The computer will make a big jump if needed. I've driven enough cvts to see that happen and enough to know I hate them except for the fact when it changes for increased load it's faster than dropping down through 4 gears in an 8 speed transmission (my wifes odyssey).


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When I drove a new Civic EX-T last summer for a day, I liked how the CVT worked. It had little of the "rubber band effect" which older CVTs had. (In essence, the engine would moan along at some constant RPM while the car would increase in speed.) It's been said many times in the automotive press that the current CVTs are programmed to act more like an automatic transmission, since that is what consumers are used to.

It had no issues on some of the hilly roads we used it on, and when I nailed the throttle a few times on I-15, it did the faux downshift and got up to speed very quickly. No complaints there, and I'll take two pulleys and a belt over all the gears, solenoids and hydraulic passageways in an automatic any day of the week.
 
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