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I'm installing LED bulbs in the front marker lamp/turn signal assemblies on my 2016 EX. There's a black wire, a green wire, and a yellow wire (passenger side assembly) connected to the terminals, as shown below, where you can see the markings. Can you identify what these symbols mean? Usually, I would guess that the black wire is ground/negative, but "CV" (Constant Voltage)? The "8" marking could be the voltage, which is the approximate measurement I get with a multimeter. But then what the heck is that flower-shaped thingy supposed to mean? I suppose the markings aren't that important as long as the actual wire colors are correct…

137219


If I need to install a load resistor across two wires to eliminate "hyper-flashing," which two colors would they be?
 

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I'm installing LED bulbs in the front marker lamp/turn signal assemblies on my 2016 EX. There's a black wire, a green wire, and a yellow wire (passenger side assembly) connected to the terminals, as shown below, where you can see the markings. Can you identify what these symbols mean? Usually, I would guess that the black wire is ground/negative, but "CV" (Constant Voltage)? The "8" marking could be the voltage, which is the approximate measurement I get with a multimeter. But then what the heck is that flower-shaped thingy supposed to mean? I suppose the markings aren't that important as long as the actual wire colors are correct…

View attachment 137219

If I need to install a load resistor across two wires to eliminate "hyper-flashing," which two colors would they be?
Keep in mind that the markings may have nothing to do with the function of the wires. They may be the manufacturer's marks for connector type, production run, mold ID, etc. If you haven't solved your issue yet, I would suggest using a meter to check the voltage. One will be ground, the other constantly on with the with the headlights, and the other is the turn signal circuit. "Hyper flashing" is a characteristic that goes back to the old thermal flashers and indicates that a bulb is burnt out. LEDs take much less current, ergo higher resistance compared to incandescent bulbs. The resistor goes between the turn signal circuit and gound to pass additional current.
 
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