Honda CR-V Owners Club Forums banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of December's Ride of the Month Challenge!
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I love the squarish shape of the Gen 2 CRV but most used cars available are near 200K miles.
Is it possible to install a Gen 3 motor or transmission in Gen 2 CRV, if it became necessary?

On a separate note, why do all car manufacturers think that the egg shaped body is best looking?
 

·
Registered
2006 CR-V LX
Joined
·
255 Posts
I love the squarish shape of the Gen 2 CRV but most used cars available are near 200K miles.
Is it possible to install a Gen 3 motor or transmission in Gen 2 CRV, if it became necessary?

On a separate note, why do all car manufacturers think that the egg shaped body is best looking?
Possible, but you'd have other things to deal with like the fact that the wiring harness might be very different. Those are expensive. Usually you'd have issues with the car's computer not being capable of managing the newer engine, so you'd have to change out the computer which might have problems not meshing well with the older car. Many parts could be different, like the intake or the frame mounting locations for the motor mounts. You'd have to modify or retrofit stuff to get everything to work correctly. It could cost you a pretty penny to do that. But yes, it is possible.

My suggestion is to find a Gen 2 that has lower miles and is in good running condition. I found my daughter's 2006 CR-V about a year and a half ago and it only had 90K miles on it. I bought it for $3900 because the passnger fender was damaged in a minor accident, so that corner of the car didn't look nice.. Other than that it was a good deal and operated perfectly. There's got to be a Gen 2 out there with lower miles and in the kind of shape you want.

Car shapes evolve over the years and that has always been the case. Smooth lines/curves and aerodynamic body shapes are required to satisfy the government's ever-increasing demands for fuel efficiency. Also, people get bored with the same body design and are excited to see changes in that. "Boxy" looking cars tend to look dated to some people, especially if the preceding generations have been like that.
 

·
Registered
'07 CR-V EX-L AWD
Joined
·
4,662 Posts
I love the squarish shape of the Gen 2 CRV but most used cars available are near 200K miles.
Is it possible to install a Gen 3 motor or transmission in Gen 2 CRV, if it became necessary?

On a separate note, why do all car manufacturers think that the egg shaped body is best looking?
The main factor would be cost, which would be prohibitive, followed by the amount of work that would be involved, and custom part fabrications (such as motor mounts, exhaust, wiring harnesses, etc.) It would never be worth it financially. But anything is possible if you want to take the time and spend the money. If I were younger/richer and wanted to do this, I'd lean towards the exotic, such as a V6 with a manual trans, in a CR-V.

As far as style, IMO automotive designers have been on drugs for years. Today's cars are, with almost no exception, UGLY! Also, there's no aerodynamic testing applied either, at least not to consumer grade vehicles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ideally, I was looking for the observation of someone who has already done it or has the intimate knowledge. By "possible" I meant a drop-in replacement not one with special parts and new harness/ECU etc. What I was really asking was, if the drive train parts remained interchangeable between Gen 2 and may be Gen 3. If not, then it is of course possible but out of reach or impractical for most people.
 

·
Registered
2006 CR-V LX
Joined
·
255 Posts
Today's cars are, with almost no exception, UGLY!
You got that right!


Also, there's no aerodynamic testing applied either, at least not to consumer grade vehicles.
Really? For years the automakers have been forced into fuel efficiency demands from the EPA, and this is part of the reason for some of the manufacturers using plastic engine parts, belts instead of chains (although thankfully that trend mostly went away) very thin viscosity motor and transmission oils/fluids to help meet these demands, disabling some of the cylinders at highway speeds, etc. I've noticed with some engines requiring 0w/20 (or even thinner!) motor oil in the USA and other more regulatory countries, that the exact same engines used in other countries which didn't have stringent fuel efficiency demands had thicker oil recommended. Anyway, I'm surpised to hear that aerodynamics viz a viz fuel efficiency isn't even designed into these cars. Interesting, thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
All over the world people are content with small cars which have great fuel efficiency. I would love to own a minivan like car (similar to the Scion Xb 1st gen) with a 1000cc motor doing 50/mpg and 50 mph max. But we can't have that in these SUV plagued country with monster motors. In Japan the KEI cars are so popular. Why can't we have them here. Some of us don't live in states like TX or CA with 100 mile commutes each way. See 10 Kei Cars
 

·
Registered
2006 CR-V LX
Joined
·
255 Posts
All over the world people are content with small cars which have great fuel efficiency. I would love to own a minivan like car (similar to the Scion Xb 1st gen) with a 1000cc motor doing 50/mpg and 50 mph max. But we can't have that in these SUV plagued country with monster motors. In Japan the KEI cars are so popular. Why can't we have them here. Some of us don't live in states like TX or CA with 100 mile commutes each way. See 10 Kei Cars
The USA is a different animal compared to the rest of the world. Little tiny cars with small engines (and especially not so tiny cars with small engines) just aren't popular here and they haven't sold well for long periods of time. USA also has traditionally had larger families as well, so a little car like that wouldn't work for a lot of families if they couldn't afford two cars. As an example, I had six kids, which you would rarely see in western Europe or Japan. The smaller cars I've seen that have been popular enough in the USA have had engines no smaller than 1.4 or 1.5 litres. Smaller than that and the horsepower and acceleration just aren't going to satisfy the average driver who needs to merge onto the freeway when everyone is going 75 MPH. Of course newer motors are getting more and more powerful with smaller and smaller displacements, so at some point your wish might come true.

Anyway, I think this thread has gone off the beaten path a bit! I think you've received a sufficient answer to your original question. My advice is to try to find a Gen 2 CR-V that's in good running order and go with that instead of trying to retrofit it, which the consensus agrees would be cost prohibitive. Good luck, and let us know what you wind up doing, as I'm sure some of us car enthusiasts would be interested in how you made out.
 

·
Registered
2006 CR-V LX
Joined
·
255 Posts
If necessary, I would consider looking for a JDM engine/transmission. There are still quite a few in that 45-65k mileage range that are getting imported. The long block is the same, virtually everything else gets swapped over.

see link for one importer:

It is an option, but I've heard horror stories about some of these JDM engines/transmission brokers/suppliers. There is a report that one of the companies was scamming people, getting engines from American junkyards that typically have 150K miles or even much more on them and then claiming they are JDM engines with low miles. If you read online reviews, bad service is another aspect of these JDM suppliers. An opinion I have read said that because of the laws in Japan requiring the cars to be scrapped due to needing the metal, that they don't take care of their engines with frequent oil changes like we do here. The reason being that the engine won't self-destruct by 50K miles do to infrequent oil changes, so they don't worry about it knowing that the car is going to be scrapped anyway. Another thing is that I'm under the impression that the JDM brokers don't really have any verifiable documentation as to the mileage on the engines other than what they claim. I simply don't trust them. Lastly, depending on the engines, there have been stories (not for the Honda CR-V engine/trans) that even though the engine blocks are the same, they may have different intake, heads/valvetrains, and various other appendiges, including wire harnesses and possibly computer mismatching between USA and Japan models because things are different there. Yes, most of our CR-Vs are made in Japan, so it might not be an issue, but my recommendation is to do your homework before buying something like this. I'd rather have an engine or transmission with 100K miles of American highway mileage and religious oil/fluid changes, compared to 50K miles on a Japanese drivetrain that was mostly city driving and suspect oil/fluid/filter changes do to the early recycling of their cars/metals.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
590 Posts
It is an option, but I've heard horror stories about some of these JDM engines/transmission brokers/suppliers. There is a report that one of the companies was scamming people, getting engines from American junkyards that typically have 150K miles or even much more on them and then claiming they are JDM engines with low miles. If you read online reviews, bad service is another aspect of these JDM suppliers. An opinion I have read said that because of the laws in Japan requiring the cars to be scrapped due to needing the metal, that they don't take care of their engines with frequent oil changes like we do here. The reason being that the engine won't self-destruct by 50K miles do to infrequent oil changes, so they don't worry about it knowing that the car is going to be scrapped anyway. Another thing is that I'm under the impression that the JDM brokers don't really have any verifiable documentation as to the mileage on the engines other than what they claim. I simply don't trust them. Lastly, depending on the engines, there have been stories (not for the Honda CR-V engine/trans) that even though the engine blocks are the same, they may have different intake, heads/valvetrains, and various other appendiges, including wire harnesses and possibly computer mismatching between USA and Japan models because things are different there. Yes, most of our CR-Vs are made in Japan, so it might not be an issue, but my recommendation is to do your homework before buying something like this. I'd rather have an engine or transmission with 100K miles of American highway mileage and religious oil/fluid changes, compared to 50K miles on a Japanese drivetrain that was mostly city driving and suspect oil/fluid/filter changes do to the early recycling of their cars/metals.
I had a few different trusted mechanic shops help me search for an engine last year as I was nursing my car through a head gasket leak. No luck finding a salvage yard engine that any of my mechanics trusted.

I had good customer service from the above linked company, ”JDM of california”, located in Ontario,Ca. seems like everyone that works in that office knows each other, and they also remembered me from phone calls. (here is a mini tour from a YouTuber if you care: start at time 6:45 ...
). You should watch out though, if you google search that company, there will be 3 other companies that will show up with similar sounding business names.

the engine has only been in my crv since last October. So, long term durability is not tested on this single engine. I did have a former Acura tech to check out the engine before accepting delivery to his Indy shop. If someone in the future decides to go the JDM route, they can PM me sometime later, for a longer term review to see how the engine has performed. Of course, it will only be from a single experience.

I said earlier that the long block is the same. To be more specific, the intake manifold was the same, and the valve cover is subtly different ... but virtually every thing else got removed/ swapped over from my car. The only thing I have extra that will fit is the alternator (the vtec spool valve solenoid probably could have been used, but it had shipping damage). the Japan engine also came with an egr that needed to be removed.

In any case, what I’m saying is that the k24 is a pretty common engine as crvs, elements, and accords used it, so it is still possible to find a swap if needed.
 

·
Registered
2006 CR-V LX
Joined
·
255 Posts
I had a few different trusted mechanic shops help me search for an engine last year as I was nursing my car through a head gasket leak. No luck finding a salvage yard engine that any of my mechanics trusted.

I had good customer service from the above linked company, ”JDM of california”, located in Ontario,Ca. seems like everyone that works in that office knows each other, and they also remembered me from phone calls. (here is a mini tour from a YouTuber if you care: start at time 6:45 ...
). You should watch out though, if you google search that company, there will be 3 other companies that will show up with similar sounding business names.

the engine has only been in my crv since last October. So, long term durability is not tested on this single engine. I did have a former Acura tech to check out the engine before accepting delivery to his Indy shop. If someone in the future decides to go the JDM route, they can PM me sometime later, for a longer term review to see how the engine has performed. Of course, it will only be from a single experience.

I said earlier that the long block is the same. To be more specific, the intake manifold was the same, and the valve cover is subtly different ... but virtually every thing else got removed/ swapped over from my car. The only thing I have extra that will fit is the alternator (the vtec spool valve solenoid probably could have been used, but it had shipping damage). the Japan engine also came with an egr that needed to be removed.

In any case, what I’m saying is that the k24 is a pretty common engine as crvs, elements, and accords used it, so it is still possible to find a swap if needed.
Thanks for the info!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
590 Posts
Thanks for the info!
I would also still emphasize your post too. You can’t just pick any JDM importer, nor can you just pick an engine out of a salvage yard without doing your best to find out where it came from. And I would really have someone who is experienced in swapping engines there during delivery to check things over. The last thing you want is to get an engine put in that already had problems.

I forgot, there is often a short warranty with used engines that you should look into for specifics. Some of the warranties require engine installation by someone ASE certified, some of the warranties require someone certified to attest that it was a bad engine before places may honor a warranty.
 

·
Registered
'07 CR-V EX-L AWD
Joined
·
4,662 Posts
All over the world people are content with small cars which have great fuel efficiency. I would love to own a minivan like car (similar to the Scion Xb 1st gen) with a 1000cc motor doing 50/mpg and 50 mph max. But we can't have that in these SUV plagued country with monster motors. In Japan the KEI cars are so popular. Why can't we have them here. Some of us don't live in states like TX or CA with 100 mile commutes each way. See 10 Kei Cars
Three miles west of my house is Tx 130, where the speed limit is 85 mph, 24/7, for all vehicles. Three miles East of my house is I-35, where the speed limit is mostly 75. Little tiny cars get eaten for lunch here, or blown off in the ditch. My CR-V will hold it's own, but just that. And that's when the wind ain't blowin.'
 

·
Registered
2006 CR-V LX
Joined
·
255 Posts
Three miles west of my house is Tx 130, where the speed limit is 85 mph, 24/7, for all vehicles. Three miles East of my house is I-35, where the speed limit is mostly 75. Little tiny cars get eaten for lunch here, or blown off in the ditch.
Assuming traffic on I-35 in Austin is actually moving? Heh heh. The worst part of my trip is when I have to pass through Austin on my way to or from seeing my kids in Denton. Hasn't been too bad lately with the schools closed though.
 

·
Registered
'07 CR-V EX-L AWD
Joined
·
4,662 Posts
Yeah, right now traffic is easy - there ain't none. In fact, interestingly enough, they said on the news the other day that there has been a sudden rash of very severe accidents since the shutdown because there is now enough room to drive like a maniac, so people are, and fatalities are up. But yes, normally it's a parking lot out there all day.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top