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Discussion Starter #21
Oh, I was able to see it in it's clearest/brand new state on the dip stick from day one. Eagle vision. I actually giggled at all of the complaints about not being able to read the dipstick. I guess not enough people know that you simply hold the dipstick at an angle under the light to see the wet mark, plain as day.

My drive ended up putting the mileage at about 5200 and 40% oil life. I've noticed that the front tires are starting to become a little bit ridged on the corners so I guess that's the strobe light alert in my brain for an oil change and tire rotation.
 

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Tangentially, when you're removing the lower engine cover take note that the bolts that look like philips heads are actually JIS crossheads, if I remember right. Below is a link for the bits. The dang bolt in the center rear made me do some swearing as I stripped the head. That seems to be the worst one.

 

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Discussion Starter #23
Tangentially, when you're removing the lower engine cover take note that the bolts that look like philips heads are actually JIS crossheads, if I remember right. Below is a link for the bits. The dang bolt in the center rear made me do some swearing as I stripped the head. That seems to be the worst one.

They look like a Phillips screwdriver head with the tip filed down.
 

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Gen 5, '19 EX owner here. Current mileage the new V is 4500. I check the oil level every other fill up at the gas station, so once every few weeks, or more often.

MM says 50% oil life remaining but the oil itself has turned dark in the last few weeks. Didn't know that synthetic oil can have a dirty look to it? I understand that the factory adds molybdenum to the original batch of oil. Perhaps that is what is turning dark?

Should I change the oil now or follow the MM? I am departing on a long road trip (highway speeds) in a few days and I don't want to cause any damage if dark oil should be replaced.

Thanks.
At 50% it might be a good idea to get the oil changed if you have the 11.5 lt. turbo. If you notice your oil level will be a little high because gasoline is getting in with the oil.
 

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Motor oil in direct injected engines turns darker quicker than oil in port injected engines. Changing oil before your trip won't hurt a thing.......probably not necessary either. Whatever makes you sleep better.
Maybe its all that gasoline thats in the oil causing excessive wear that is turning the oil dark.
 

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Maybe its all that gasoline thats in the oil causing excessive wear that is turning the oil dark.
What GDI engines are you seeing with excessive wear????

You must not be old enough to have driven cars with a carburetor........they turned oil black in 500-1000 miles. With proper maintenance, even those could go 250K miles without a problem. I have a '79 Chevy 350 motor on an engine stand right now with 227K miles, running like a top when pulled, still see some cross hatch. Rochester Quadra-Slurp carb from the factory.
 

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What GDI engines are you seeing with excessive wear????

You must not be old enough to have driven cars with a carburetor........they turned oil black in 500-1000 miles. With proper maintenance, even those could go 250K miles without a problem. I have a '79 Chevy 350 motor on an engine stand right now with 227K miles, running like a top when pulled, still see some cross hatch. Rochester Quadra-Slurp carb from the factory.
I am old enough to have had cars with carburetors. The carburetor has little to do with dark oil, the dark oil was from the detergent oil suspending the worn engine debris and dirt in the oil.
Today with GDI on the 1.5 lt. turbo in the CR-V for example, you are seeing premature engine wear probably from piston rings metal from cylinder walls and bearings due to severe fuel contamination with the oil. This will obviously shorten the life of the engine. Engines are not designed to be lubricated with gasoline.
My CR-V currently has about 40% gasoline in the crankcase.
 

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I am old enough to have had cars with carburetors. The carburetor has little to do with dark oil, the dark oil was from the detergent oil suspending the worn engine debris and dirt in the oil.
Today with GDI on the 1.5 lt. turbo in the CR-V for example, you are seeing premature engine wear probably from piston rings metal from cylinder walls and bearings due to severe fuel contamination with the oil. This will obviously shorten the life of the engine. Engines are not designed to be lubricated with gasoline.
My CR-V currently has about 40% gasoline in the crankcase.
To your response to wear do I see excessive wear?
I see it on my CR-V after having an oil analyst, it showed excessive metal and gasoline in the oil.
 

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I am old enough to have had cars with carburetors. The carburetor has little to do with dark oil, the dark oil was from the detergent oil suspending the worn engine debris and dirt in the oil.
Today with GDI on the 1.5 lt. turbo in the CR-V for example, you are seeing premature engine wear probably from piston rings metal from cylinder walls and bearings due to severe fuel contamination with the oil. This will obviously shorten the life of the engine. Engines are not designed to be lubricated with gasoline.
My CR-V currently has about 40% gasoline in the crankcase.
Actually carbs did because of running rich at times, one of many contributing factors to dark oil. Most of what's causing the dark color is the oil breaking down into "carbon" as we call it for short. Gas breaks it down more quickly than detergents so a carb or any engine running rich will darken much faster.

Everyone here knows 2018+ Vs have a fuel issue causing it to dilute the oil. Anyone who says it's not harming the engine has their head up their butt though. As a life like tech I can tell you it shortens engine life by a lot and increases wear badly.

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I am old enough to have had cars with carburetors. The carburetor has little to do with dark oil, the dark oil was from the detergent oil suspending the worn engine debris and dirt in the oil.
Today with GDI on the 1.5 lt. turbo in the CR-V for example, you are seeing premature engine wear probably from piston rings metal from cylinder walls and bearings due to severe fuel contamination with the oil. This will obviously shorten the life of the engine. Engines are not designed to be lubricated with gasoline.
My CR-V currently has about 40% gasoline in the crankcase.

Wrong again, no surprise though. The black that accumulates in the oil over time.. is almost entirely soot from combustion, which is why it stays in suspension in the oil so well.

There are good number of CRV owners who were concerned early on about engine wear due to fuel in the oil.. yet their oil analysis reports continue to come back free of metal particles... even though the oil will generally show fuel dilution.

Stop with your wild assertions and actually take time to read actual oil analysis reports posted by owners. Better yet.. run some on your own vehicle if it is such a personal concern to you. Some owners have even posted them for each oil change over tens of thousands of miles... to show the historical pattern in the oil in their vehicle.... and again... no signs of metal particles in their oil.
 

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My 1st EFI (throttle body), O2 sensored vehicle was a '92 Chevy p/u. When checking the dipstick, I was amazed how the motor oil, even after 3-4K miles, still had the light honey color look vs the carbureted vehicle the p/u replaced. All of the carbureted vehicles I drove/owned since the early 60s turned fresh oil black after 500-1000 miles, BUT, I never had even a single vehicle with lubrication problems OR have excessive engine wear from black oil at 500 miles. I got rid of them because of Gulf Coast cancer (rust), worn out suspensions, torn seat covers or because I was tired of them and wanted something new.

All of the vehicles I've owned since the early 90s have had EFI (either throttle body or port) and O2 sensors.....and again, it's amazing to me how long (in miles) the oil will remain light honey colored. I'll be changing the oil/filter this weekend on our '09 port EFI RAV4. The oil has a tic over 6K miles and damn near looks like (on the dipstick) it was just poured out of bottle.

Pulling the dipstick on the V kinda reminds me of those days of old (carbureted).......the oil on the dipstick has darked somewhat at +/-1000 miles. Instead of sitting around with my head up my butt, a little bit of informative/educational reading indicates early oil darkening is common in almost all GDI engines vs port EFI engines. "life like tech", that's funny.........is that similar to f__e news?:giggle:

With my kind of driving, the MM has turned on each time at <4K miles and yes the oil is pretty dark (resembling a carbureted engine from the days of old). Do I throw up my hands, wet my pants and scream excessive engine wear????. No,..........I just drop about $20 and change the oil/filter. Just like I did back in the days of old.....and never had an excessive engine wear issue back then and don't think I will presently either. Time will tell.......maybe the seat covers will wear out before the engine does.🤷‍♂️

Time will tell with regard to excessive engine wear in GDI engines.
 

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....................My CR-V currently has about 40% gasoline in the crankcase.
40%?:poop: Dayum! Did you put the gas nozzle in the oil fill?
 

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Diesel engines turn the oil dark rapidly, do they wear out quickly?
Which post are you referring to?
And YES, Diesels do make the oil dark rapidly, compared to gasoline powered engines, so just color change in the oil is not a real good indicator or the oil's life expectancy.
BUT, if I change the oil in my gasoline engine car if it starts getting dark,way ahead of schedule, does that possibly help keep the valve train, etc cleaner? I think so.
But, since I only drive around 8k miles a year, no big deal on cost. I do LIKE a clean engine interior.
Buffalo4
 

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Color doesn’t mean much, the reason for the color change would be the possible concern.

If the contamination is from metal, and it happens rapidly, then there’s more to be looked into. Just changing the oil frequently obviously isn’t helping to solve the actual problem.

If it makes someone feel better to change it sooner than recommend I don’t see any downside to it though.
 

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.........and it will take a few more years and some engine tear downs to expose early excessive engine wear.

I don’t change oil based on color......I change by the owners manual recommendation......both back in the days of old and presently. Why would oil of any color, changed when it’s supposed to be changed, cause excessive engine wear?🐟
 

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Actually carbs did because of running rich at times, one of many contributing factors to dark oil. Most of what's causing the dark color is the oil breaking down into "carbon" as we call it for short. Gas breaks it down more quickly than detergents so a carb or any engine running rich will darken much faster.

Everyone here knows 2018+ Vs have a fuel issue causing it to dilute the oil. Anyone who says it's not harming the engine has their head up their butt though. As a life like tech I can tell you it shortens engine life by a lot and increases wear badly.

Sent from my SM-N975U using Tapatalk
correct
 

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I agree a carb can cause a rich mixture but I never owned one that dumped two quarts of gasoline into the crankcase in a couple thousand miles like my CR-V. This discussion was about CR-Vs with dirty oil.I m sure the dark color is from fuel and premature metal wear. I only hope they can fix this issue.
 

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Both carburetors and GDI turn the oil dark sooner than port EFI. Carbureted engines, when properly maintained, lasted 100s of thousands of miles back in the day with dark oil. So will GDI engines, when properly maintained.

How long are you going leave the crankcase overfilled????
 
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