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I just got lost, so keep me posted about your issue or issues at hand, hope the problem has a awesome resolution
 

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I just don't understand why the extended warranty gave for 1.5T engines wouldn't apply in this case.
Asked, and answered, already. The answer will not change. :) Sometimes we simply have to cope with answers we do not like.

It is pretty clear now from Honda corporate responses that they do not see a correlation between the early issues on some vehicles with abnormal oil rise and subsequent later issues on some CRVs with bad injectors. And warranty extension would never cover injectors, for reasons already explained.

Since Honda are the only ones with sufficient details, data, and knowledge about the engine design, I would be loathe to second guess them, much less speculate on trying to couple one issue with another. Prove that your probably bad injectors is somehow related to and caused by abnormal oil rise and you might get somewhere. Problem is, you can't, none of us can.
 

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I just don't understand why the extended warranty gave for 1.5T engines wouldn't apply in this case.
Because in the earlier vehicles in very cold weather the oil level could increase to such a high level oil would get sucked up into the engine intake via the PCV system and oil foul the spark plugs. Also in the TSB, was to check the cam shaft for excessive wear due to lack of lubrication caused by the diluted oil.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
To circle back on this. The delaer insisted that spark plugs were the issue and that they couldn't do any further work until they were changed. I insisted that wasn't the issue, but told them that they were welcome to change them under the oil dilution extended warranty offered by Honda. They did get Honda to pay for new spark plugs and an oil change. And also got a loaner car for 8 days by the time all was said and done.

Of course, this didn't fix the issue. After the spark plug change, ten minutes under idle in the hot sun and the lights were all back on. After this they were willing to troubleshoot the further. The fuel injectors "tested fine" multiple times. It wasn't until they started swapping some other parts out that the fuel injectors started showing issues. Eventually the injectors did indeed look to be the culprit and were changed. Because the car had 110K miles on it, I did not make any headway on getting Honda to pay for those (though I know from other posts that some other people got parts paid for and only paid labor). On a long trip now, 5 days, couple thousand miles, no issues.

I guess the important thing is that from the other posts on this page, I knew with about 90% certainty that it was the injectors when I walked into the shop for repair. Even armed with that info, it still took 5 dealer visits, more than 3 weeks in and out of the shop, and some difficult conversations with the dealer. Total cost was $1200 plus the cost of self replacing the battery (early troubleshooting for this issue).
 

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Thanks for circling back and letting us know the outcomes. Much appreciated in this forum when members do this. (y)

To circle back on this. The delaer insisted that spark plugs were the issue and that they couldn't do any further work until they were changed. I insisted that wasn't the issue, but told them that they were welcome to change them under the oil dilution extended warranty offered by Honda. They did get Honda to pay for new spark plugs and an oil change. And also got a loaner car for 8 days by the time all was said and done.
Fact is, sometimes it is the plugs and not the injectors. Only way to know is to swap them out first, since they are a much lower cost solution, and Honda did cover all the costs. This as a first step, probably was recommended by Honda Customer Support Engineering, since the injectors were not specifically testing bad according to your dealer.

The dealer gave you a loaner while they had your CRV, so I think all around this was not a bad first step to take and if they were right... you would be saved the cost of replacing the injectors.

Of course, this didn't fix the issue. After the spark plug change, ten minutes under idle in the hot sun and the lights were all back on. After this they were willing to troubleshoot the further. The fuel injectors "tested fine" multiple times. It wasn't until they started swapping some other parts out that the fuel injectors started showing issues. Eventually the injectors did indeed look to be the culprit and were changed. Because the car had 110K miles on it, I did not make any headway on getting Honda to pay for those (though I know from other posts that some other people got parts paid for and only paid labor). On a long trip now, 5 days, couple thousand miles, no issues.
Yeah, no surprise that Honda would turn down an appeal for partial coverage (usually they provide the injectors for free) with a CRV with over a 100K miles on it. The injector issue, when it does appear in a gen5, most often presents first errors at around 50-75K miles. My guess is Honda has an internal guideline (not shared with the public) for approving this particular exception and it would have a mileage limit, among other factors that determine if they grant an exception coverage or not.

What I do like is that Honda has been pretty consistent in providing the injectors at no cost to the owner in the request for exception consideration.

All in all, this sounds like a good dealer to me. Worked the low hanging possible cause first, and one that Honda would cover. And when that failed, they swapped out the injectors to resolve the issue. I guess it does not surprise me that the injectors did not flag as bad initially, as the problem can be dependent on a range of different things in the fuel delivery system in order to actually show up as injectors.
 

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OK here is what we found......We had the exact same issus, xmas tree all over the dash. Changed batteries, still happened, all 4 fuel injectors went and the dealer said that could have been the problem also, fuel injectors went again after 6 months, still lights came on eventually....OK heres the good part.....on vacation in Utah when the battery dies, had a gear head check things out and he said he had the same issue with a friends car. There is a ground on the firewall behind the battery area. Only ground for the entire car. The firewall is painted BEFORE they attach the ground wire. He took off the wire, sanded the paint off the body where it connects and sanded the ground connection. Hasnt happened since. We have tried everything looking fo this problem and I think we have found the cause. Not enough ground connection. Hope this helps everyone else.
 

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OK here is what we found......We had the exact same issus, xmas tree all over the dash. Changed batteries, still happened, all 4 fuel injectors went and the dealer said that could have been the problem also, fuel injectors went again after 6 months, still lights came on eventually....OK heres the good part.....on vacation in Utah when the battery dies, had a gear head check things out and he said he had the same issue with a friends car. There is a ground on the firewall behind the battery area. Only ground for the entire car. The firewall is painted BEFORE they attach the ground wire. He took off the wire, sanded the paint off the body where it connects and sanded the ground connection. Hasnt happened since. We have tried everything looking fo this problem and I think we have found the cause. Not enough ground connection. Hope this helps everyone else.
I would bet money here that the bolt simply was not properly torqued.

If you look closely you will see that the bolt makes contact with the top of the flat cable bar, and then makes contact directly into the chassis via threaded hole in chassis and the bolt. THAT is the ground path, NOT the front surface of the chassis that is painted. The flat blade of the cable even has an alignment tap on it that slips into a hole punched into the chassis to insure proper alignment as well.

Still a good find as that bolt if not properly torqued, or if somehow corroded, could degrade the ground between battery and chassis. It would have been great to have seen an resistance measurement between chassis ground bolt and the negative terminal of the battery. I bet it read more than one ohm.. which would be a problem and not a problem from the paint on the chassis.
 

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Either way it’s a great pointer as a possible source along with dirty battery connections. Now worth checking and adding a dab of battery terminal grease.
I would definitely NOT put terminal grease on that chassis ground connection. Properly torgued down.. that connection is gas tight.. and will not corrode the ground connection.. at least not until the bolt is so corroded it fails (which I very much doubt can happen). And unlike the battery terminals, it is not exposed to outgasing of electrolyte resulting in slow corrosion.

But yes.. a good find by the member about this connection point... because if there is an improperly torqued bolt there... ground will be faulty. Worthy of being on a troubleshooting checklist.
 
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