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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My wife and I currently have two CR-Vs ('18 and '16), but I am seriously considering an Accord when the lease on the '16 is up in a few months.

However, the one thing that is giving me pause about going back to a sedan is the IIHS data showing fewer fatalities in SUVs than sedans (for example, the 2014 or equivalent Accord has 36 deaths per million vehicles registered, while CR-V AWD has 14. Data is here: https://www.iihs.org/iihs/topics/driver-death-rates).

The CR-V would still be my primary family vehicle and the Accord would be my commuter car, but my kids would still occasionally end up in the Accord, especially if my wife and I are each taking one kid on separate outings.

I know the chances of a serious accident are slim, and it's even less of an issue since my kids won't often be in the Accord, and if they are, it'll be for short, local trips. But I'm still concerned about the possibility of them being in a potentially unsafer (is that a word?) car.

What I'm wondering, though, is this: while simple physics (if a big car hits a small car, the small car would sustain more damage) is at play here, I wonder if the IIHS data isn't an accurate depiction of safety, since correlation doesn't equal causation. Obviously if a Suburban hits a Fit, the Suburban will be safer. But the weight difference is not as big when comparing a compact SUV and a midsize sedan. Should other factors be taken into account? For example, sedans are more frequently used by taxi drivers, etc, so they are more likely to be on the road for, say, 12 hours a day. An SUV on the road for an hour or two each day is much less likely to be in an accident. Can that be enough to cause the discrepancy?
 

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I keep your 16 and say thank you.
been there and not regretting my corolla at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
CR-V 4WD = 14
CR-V 2WD = 22
CR-V total = 36 same as the Accord.
I don't think that works, because the 14 and 22 are each per million, so adding them, it would be 36 per two million. The Accord is 36 per one million.

I keep your 16 and say thank you.
I'm not doing that, but I might get a '19 CR-V (or CX-5 or RAV4, but I doubt it). But I'm heavily leaning toward the Accord because it's less expensive, I think I'll enjoy driving it a bit more, and it's something different from what I already have.
 

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I don't think that works, because the 14 and 22 are each per million, so adding them, it would be 36 per two million. The Accord is 36 per one million.
Did you also look at the Top Safety Picks information?

Or are you using that one number to make a decision?
 

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Problem with these stats is they don't factor in driving behavior. Do sedan drivers drive more aggressively than a CR-V driver? Don't know. Does a Corvette driver drive more aggressively than a CR-V driver? Probably. In a 1989 report, Corvettes had a death rate of 520.

https://www.iihs.org/externaldata/srdata/docs/sr2411.pdf

If safety is a major concern, I would go by the safety test ratings rather than deaths per vehicles registered. On the other hand, if you get hit head on by a semi, it won't make much difference which vehicle you are driving.
 

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I'm big with safety, I mean BIG. And I know the chances of getting into an accident are slim and I think I'm an OK driver, but mosthly I worry about the wanna be Nascar drivers, people texting, or drunks on the road.

And if I could I would have my family drive in a tank, but we know that's not realistic.

So, I like yourself try to drive vehicles that are Top Safety Pick Plus from the iihs.org list.
I prefer CUV over sedans for two reasons, one the CUV's are easier to get in and out and are easy on my back, the other one is the view, I can see a little higher/better than a lower than a sedan. I can see vehicles ahead and can maybe avoid a crash. I used to drive in NYC for many years so I had my share.

I also looked at the Accord and I believe is a very safe vehicle, better than your 16' CRV (passenger small overlap crash test is better on the Accord) So I drive a 2018 CRV and the wife and rest of the family drive a 2017 Mazda CX5 GT. Both are a Top Safety Plus pick.
And I'm not worry on what vehicle the wife or the kids are driving. The wife loves her CX5 but likes the fact that she can use Waze on the CRV, so she's been driving it lately.
 

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the accord is by far a excellent car I was in one today and first thing I said to my friend way to many buttons for that radio and climate wow. His words were totally agree to much happening there
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Did you also look at the Top Safety Picks information?

Or are you using that one number to make a decision?
I have... and the Accord and CR-V have the same scores in all of the tests ("Good" across the board) except for headlights, where the Accord received an "Average." But I have also read that the size of the vehicle is more important than the test ratings, at least in head-on collisions (source: https://www.consumerreports.org/cro...shes-but-there-is-more-to-the-story/index.htm). So that doesn't mean that a Hyundai Elantra (Top Safety Pick Plus) is safer in a crash with a larger car.

If safety is a major concern, I would go by the safety test ratings rather than deaths per vehicles registered. On the other hand, if you get hit head on by a semi, it won't make much difference which vehicle you are driving.
Well, yeah. But in this country of people driving SUVs, if you're hit head on by a Ford Explorer, does it matter if you're driving an Accord or CR-V? That's what I'm not sure of.
 

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I dived deeper into the Consumer Reports site (I subscribe, so I have access to everything on their site).
Consumer Reports allows you to select multiple vehicles and compare their information side by side on the web page.
I did a comparison between a 2019 Accord EX and a 2019 CR-V EX.

I noticed that their fuel economy comparisons say that driving 12,000 miles a year the CR-V will cost you US $100 more than the Accord ($935 vs. $1035).

From a Safety standpoint they are very close, aside from:

The Accord handles a bit better in an emergency:

Emergency Handling rating: Accord 4 of 5, CR-V 3 of 5
Avoidance Maneuver Max Speed: Accord 55 mph, CR-V 52 MPH

In the Crash and Rollover section both had the same "Good" rating in the IIHS tests and 5 stars in all of the NHTSA tests...except the CR-V only got 4 stars for the NHTSA Rollover test.

So looking at the details, the Accord is a bit safer.


Accord Curb weight: 3,199 lbs
CR-V Curb weight: 3,307 to 3,512 lbs
So the heaviest CR-V (probably the AWD model) is only 313 lbs heavier, about 9%.
Not enough to make a difference in a crash, as the IIHS and NHTSA ratings show.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Not enough to make a difference in a crash, as the IIHS and NHTSA ratings show.
Thanks for all of that. I'm not sure I understand your last point. Do the IIHS and NHTSA have data on how many pounds of weight makes a difference in a crash?
 

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Think people are way over thinking this. All modern passenger vehicles are designed with crumple zones and so on for safety.

First thing is to forget the electronic safety features exist. They arent there so you dont have to pay attention. They are there to increase the chance of avoiding an accident that comes out with next to no time to respond.

Messing with the infotainment system and all the other crap while driving is just as had as texting while driving

Concentrate on pay attention to the other drivers and be aware of your surroundings. Dont speed excessively and dont be like the elderly how drive WELL under the speed limit (which causes countless accidents because people are trying to move around. And they dont turn their flashers on as required to signal a slow moving vehicle).

That limits you to someone pulling out from a side street as a serious threat.

The key is to pay attention and be a better driver because the chances of an accident are actually quite high compared to most other things. Be aware and drive within the limits of you and your vehicle because no matter the ratings etc your talking less than 1% increase or decrease risk of injury or death between any modern vehicles.

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Think people are way over thinking this. All modern passenger vehicles are designed with crumple zones and so on for safety.

First thing is to forget the electronic safety features exist. They arent there so you dont have to pay attention. They are there to increase the chance of avoiding an accident that comes out with next to no time to respond.

Messing with the infotainment system and all the other crap while driving is just as had as texting while driving

Concentrate on pay attention to the other drivers and be aware of your surroundings. Dont speed excessively and dont be like the elderly how drive WELL under the speed limit (which causes countless accidents because people are trying to move around. And they dont turn their flashers on as required to signal a slow moving vehicle).

That limits you to someone pulling out from a side street as a serious threat.

The key is to pay attention and be a better driver because the chances of an accident are actually quite high compared to most other things. Be aware and drive within the limits of you and your vehicle because no matter the ratings etc your talking less than 1% increase or decrease risk of injury or death between any modern vehicles.
I agree with all of what you're saying about safe driving, and of course modern vehicles are more safe than vehicles used to be, but I think to totally dismiss safety differences between different vehicles and/or classes of vehicles is irresponsible, especially considering, as you said, the chances of an accident are high compared to other things.
 

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Thanks for all of that. I'm not sure I understand your last point. Do the IIHS and NHTSA have data on how many pounds of weight makes a difference in a crash?
Do they specifically test to see if heavier vehicles fare better in the tests than smaller vehicles? No, they do not.
They do a series of tests on the vehicle, and then rate how well that vehicle does in each of the tests, regardless of how much the vehicles weighs.
And the tests they conduct are the same, regardless of how much the vehicle weighs.

So you can directly compare the test results of two vehicles, even if one weighs more than the other.

And in this case, there's not enough difference between the CR-V and Accord to make a difference.


And what I keep seeing in your responses is that you've already decided that the CR-V is somehow "safer" than an Accord, regardless of what any safety tests show.

So good luck with your choice, and I don't have anything more to offer you.
 

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My wife and I currently have two CR-Vs ('18 and '16), but I am seriously considering an Accord when the lease on the '16 is up in a few months.

However, the one thing that is giving me pause about going back to a sedan is the IIHS data showing fewer fatalities in SUVs than sedans (for example, the 2014 or equivalent Accord has 36 deaths per million vehicles registered, while CR-V AWD has 14. Data is here: https://www.iihs.org/iihs/topics/driver-death-rates).

The CR-V would still be my primary family vehicle and the Accord would be my commuter car, but my kids would still occasionally end up in the Accord, especially if my wife and I are each taking one kid on separate outings.

I know the chances of a serious accident are slim, and it's even less of an issue since my kids won't often be in the Accord, and if they are, it'll be for short, local trips. But I'm still concerned about the possibility of them being in a potentially unsafer (is that a word?) car.

What I'm wondering, though, is this: while simple physics (if a big car hits a small car, the small car would sustain more damage) is at play here, I wonder if the IIHS data isn't an accurate depiction of safety, since correlation doesn't equal causation. Obviously if a Suburban hits a Fit, the Suburban will be safer. But the weight difference is not as big when comparing a compact SUV and a midsize sedan. Should other factors be taken into account? For example, sedans are more frequently used by taxi drivers, etc, so they are more likely to be on the road for, say, 12 hours a day. An SUV on the road for an hour or two each day is much less likely to be in an accident. Can that be enough to cause the discrepancy?
If you want something safe get an Odyssey. The extra weight will help in a crash. I would love to have an Accord but they are too low to the ground. You dont want to be sitting behind a semi in traffic in that when some idiot texting slams into you full speed forcing you under the big rig.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
And what I keep seeing in your responses is that you've already decided that the CR-V is somehow "safer" than an Accord, regardless of what any safety tests show.
No... it's just that I am heavily leaning toward the Accord, and the only reason I'm hesitating at this point is the possibility the CR-V might be slightly safer because of the extra weight, since according to that Consumer Reports article, the weight makes more of a difference than the crash tests. So I was looking for additional information to see how that applied to these two classes of vehicles, since their weights are fairly similar. Your information from Consumer Reports was helpful, showing that despite the lower weight, the Accord has other safety advantages.
 

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I don't know if you have considered some additional factors to safety:

Stopping distances and maneuverability (emergency handling, and accident avoidance), just to name a couple. And I have no figures to compare the Accord to the CR-V, but a vehicle that stops even 10 feet shorter just might help one avoid an accident, and one that can turn quicker (maneuverability) also might make an accident somewhat less likely.

My point being, both the Accord and the CR-V are safe vehicles, personally, I think you are over thinking this.
 

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I agree with all of what you're saying about safe driving, and of course modern vehicles are more safe than vehicles used to be, but I think to totally dismiss safety differences between different vehicles and/or classes of vehicles is irresponsible, especially considering, as you said, the chances of an accident are high compared to other things.
Not remotely irresponsible. If those ratings matter that much then means driver is a danger to others because they are relying on a vehicles safety features vs having proper skills to be on the road.

Making some big deal about small variations which apply between all vehicles (want a bigger difference, compare a full size suv like an Escalade to something the size of an accord then there is a difference worth even reading) is rediculous. In an accident that isnt going to mean one bit of difference. Maybe 1 in 10 million accidents will that slight variation reduce an injury.

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