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2018 EX-L fwd
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Discussion Starter #1
Sorry for the long post. Once again, calling on the collective genius of the CR-V Owners Club for help.

In our 2008 CR-V, we had an Alpine K455 mini amp professionally installed. Along with speaker upgrades and some sound deadening. It really changed the audio for the better. Did not remove it when we bought the new 2018.

Would like to do the same to the new 2018. Saw a YouTube about a Subaru WRX upgrade. In this one, the builder shows how to retain the OEM connectors by cutting and soldering in what he called a breakout / bypass harness for that particular radio. In this way, he sacrificed the extra harness in order to keep the same plugs on the OEM harness.

My problem is that I can not find anyone who sells a radio bypass harness for the CR-V.

I guess I have 2 questions:

1.] is there such a thing as a buy-pass harness, I.e. a cable that has both 24 pin male and female connectors?

2.] for how many years has the audio connection that is presently in the 2018 model been around?

Below is the link regarding the Subaru WRX build. Check around the 17:00 mark for what I am talking about.
 

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Super Moderator
'07 CR-V EX-L AWD
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I'd check with Crutchfield. They do build custom harnesses, and just might be able to fix you up. Let us know what you do.
 

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2018 EX-L fwd
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536 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
So far, the is where I stand.

After pulling out the OEM h/u, I discovered it is a Mitsubishi NR-000 model.
fullsizeoutput_850.jpeg
Just got off of the phone with a Crutchfield service advisor. Crutchfield does not have any harnesses for either this radio model or car model. The site mentioned in the YouTube video I shared is Subaru only. I emailed the person running the site to see what kind of info he could send me regarding either the particular Mitsubishi NR-000 radio harness or if there was a site like his that handled Honda harnesses. Still waiting for his reply.

Guess I'm going to see if there is anyone is SoCentral TX who can make a bypass harness that I can sacrifice to get the connections I want. I have soldered before, but only on a work bench. Something about soldering inside the dashboard radio cutout on the EX-L dashboard gives me the willies. In that regards, spending for a specialty made bypass harness will be cheaper than repairing all the burn marks around my dashboard radio cutout.
 

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So far, the is where I stand.

After pulling out the OEM h/u, I discovered it is a Mitsubishi NR-000 model. View attachment 138456 Just got off of the phone with a Crutchfield service advisor. Crutchfield does not have any harnesses for either this radio model or car model. The site mentioned in the YouTube video I shared is Subaru only. I emailed the person running the site to see what kind of info he could send me regarding either the particular Mitsubishi NR-000 radio harness or if there was a site like his that handled Honda harnesses. Still waiting for his reply.

Guess I'm going to see if there is anyone is SoCentral TX who can make a bypass harness that I can sacrifice to get the connections I want. I have soldered before, but only on a work bench. Something about soldering inside the dashboard radio cutout on the EX-L dashboard gives me the willies. In that regards, spending for a specialty made bypass harness will be cheaper than repairing all the burn marks around my dashboard radio cutout.
See metra link above.. That is for most manufactures.

Picture of factory connector?

I recently tapped in a line converter for a guy with a newer pickup. I suggested getting connectors as I prefer cleaner install and not mess with factory harness. He insisted NO. So I stripped back little insulation and soldered onto existing factory harness. Taped or heat shrink added. Works great.
 

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'07 CR-V EX-L AWD
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You can go the route of installing an amp that requires having a line converter, but there are also amps available that accept the existing speaker wires as input. Unless you are into serious sound pressure, they will work just fine.
 

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The line converter reviewed above has much more features for OEM connection than your average speaker lever input capable amp.
 

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You do not want to go the route of using oem speaker outputs to an amplifiers high level inputs. Newer car audio systems have crossover, eq and time alignment built into their systems and it will affect the signal going into the amplifier. The output will not sound good. Your best option if using an OEM head unit as the source is to go with a DSP.
 

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1999 Honda CR-V 5 speed
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From reading your posts I would recommend you do anything to your car yourself. Trust me this stuff is very complicated. From what I was able to tell you more than likely have a factory amp. To add an aftermarket amp you have to catch the speaker level wires before they get to the amp. Then wire up the amp and bypass the factory amp and hook up the new amp to the factory speaker wires. That is unless there is something crazy that was done to the newer model. I used to do this for a living and the new cars are a bear to do audio upgrades. Not to mention the it will cost you a good bit. If you still want to do it. Find a very good car audio shop and have them do it.
 

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2018 EX-L fwd
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Discussion Starter #14
An update.

Have the EX-L, so the audio system does not have an amp inside the radio.

Knowing when I am in over my head, I've decided to let the professionals install the amp. Signifiant electronics upgrade between '08 and '18 V's. Visited 4 different installers yesterday. 2 said no problem just connecting amp inline between radio and the speakers. Other 2 talked about direct connection to battery along with a converter. Probably go with the latter set up.

The speakers I think I can handle myself.

Thanks for all the above info. If you have any more advice, let me know. Parts are on order. Should be starting everything around 1 May.
 

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The speakers I think I can handle myself.
Are the OEM wires thick enough for the additional power required to drive the upgraded speakers at the amplifier's output level?
 

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2018 EX-L fwd
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Discussion Starter #16
Are the OEM wires thick enough for the additional power required to drive the upgraded speakers at the amplifier's output level?
Amp is Class D, rated @ 45 watts per channel. Don't need to shake the neighbors trees.
 

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2012 CR-V EX
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You do not want to go the route of using oem speaker outputs to an amplifiers high level inputs. Newer car audio systems have crossover, eq and time alignment built into their systems and it will affect the signal going into the amplifier. The output will not sound good. Your best option if using an OEM head unit as the source is to go with a DSP.
Will a DSP bring full power to the rear speakers? Or will the majority of the power still be to the front? I am wanting to install a mini amplifier for all four speakers and use the speaker level inputs, then run the amp output wires through the factory speaker wiring. I have an EX so no external factory amplifier. You are saying this is no good? The only stock speakers I have of the 6 are the front door woofers. I thought the rear sound would improve if I replaced the rear door speakers. That was before I learned that the rear sound is limited out on the factory receiver.
 

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2018 EX-L fwd
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Discussion Starter #18
A final update for those of you interested in doing the same thing. Kind of of long, hope you don’t mind.

Products used [personal preference for Alpine as I had used their products in our 2008 CR-V]:

Alpine KTP-445U power pack;
Alpine S-S65C components for front door;
Alpine S-S65 coaxials for rear door;
Kilmat 50 ml butyl sound deadening.

1.]. Hats off to both the advisors and tech support at crutchfield.com,. Made everything easier.

2.] Know your limitations before beginning. Easier, cheaper, and faster to get an expert to do it right the first time than to pay someone to correct your errors. Thanks Custom Sound.

3.]. An investment in a sound deadening butyl product is well worth the money. I used Kilmat but other brands are out there.

4.] Clean off every surface on which you will place the deadener. Be sure where you want it to go, because it doesn’t come off very easily once you press it down.

5.] Deadening all 4 doors and the spare tire well took approximately 8 hours total. Much of that was spent trying to keep the moisture barrier on the doors from sticking to itself so that I could reuse it.

6.] Removing door liners a snap. Remove window control panel, one screw, and you can pull off the door liner. Just be sure the green clips come with the liner & don’t stay on the door.

7.] Took about 4 Kilmat sheets to do each door. I covered about 60% of the inside outer door, along with various strips along the inner steel lining where the moisture barrier is attached. [Did not include photos because everyone has their own opinion on how much deadener to use.]

8.] When working on the doors, be sure to wear gloves and a long sleeve shirt. Metal edges make for nasty cuts.

9]. While you can use a roller to smooth down the deadener, a couple of plastic trim removal tools work just as well if not better.

10.] Bought replacement tweeter covers for the front doors. Thanks to forum supporter Bernardi. Was cheaper to order & ship from Bernardi in Maine than to get them from local Alamo City Honda dealers. Only required minimal enlarging of hole for tweeter to fit.

11.] The spare tire well took about 6 sheets plus the leftovers from the doors. Just have to remove 2 plastic trim pieces at the lock and sill, 2 screws on the cover at the base of the rear seats, & 4 plugs holding the felt liner in place. Left factory installed “deadening” material on the floor, knocked off the sharp edges. Vacuumed out spare tire well. Layered the Kilmat over everything.

Results:

1.]. Doors close with a thunk. No tinny sound when tapping.

2.] Extraneous noise greatly diminished. Have Kumho OEM tires, so I do have road noise from them.

3.] Before with the OEM speakers and no deadening, had to play @ 9-11 levels to hear anything well. Now, can play @ 6-7 levels with much cleaner, crisper sound. Sitting in driveway, 5 is loud enough.

I am extremely satisfied with the results. Sounds great to my ears, but I don’t get the dirty looks from the neighbors. Not sure how much more deadener I’ll place on the V. Law of diminishing returns comes into play.
 

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'07 CR-V EX-L AWD
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So you needed 22 sheets of the kilmat stuff? What size are they and where did you get the stuff? Also, were you able to mount the amp under the dash, or where did it go?
 

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2018 EX-L fwd
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Discussion Starter #20
So you needed 22 sheets of the kilmat stuff? What size are they and where did you get the stuff? Also, were you able to mount the amp under the dash, or where did it go?
Had a sound shop install the amp. The 2008 had it up in the dashboard, I believe. Not sure where it is on the 2018. The only way to know that it is there is to turn the radio up to 11 & plug your ears. Will stop by shop & ask tech where it was installed.

Since this posting, deadened the rear hatch. Same process - remove trim & interior panel. Apply on inside of outer skin & along door support frame. Discovered that 1 of the supports wasn't attached to rear panel. Could move support with finger. Is now firmly attached with several layers of Kilmat.

Bought the Kilmat on Amazon. https://www.amazon.com/Kilmat-Deadening-Automotive-Insulation-dampening/dp/B0751G6TMV/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?crid=EFX8J50QEIGV&dchild=1&keywords=kilmat+50ml+50+sqft+car+sound+deadening+mat&qid=1595937137&sprefix=kilmat,aps,185&sr=8-1-spons&psc=1&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUEzSUs0NTRURDIxTEdQJmVuY3J5cHRlZElkPUEwMTY2NzE4MlQzR1FUMzYxUExQSyZlbmNyeXB0ZWRBZElkPUEwMzY2MzUyMVJCNTlDN1BYTkczSCZ3aWRnZXROYW1lPXNwX2F0ZiZhY3Rpb249Y2xpY2tSZWRpcmVjdCZkb05vdExvZ0NsaWNrPXRydWU=.

When done with the 2018, had about 9 sheets left. When I upgraded our 2010 Accord, did not deaden the insides of the doors. Spent a couple of hours doing that, again with great results.

Still have 2 full & 1/4 sheets left.

As I stated above, I did not include pics of the deadening because everyone has their own opinion about how much to use and where to place it. Did not want to initiate a firefight among audiologists in this forum. Can only say that you are the final judge of what sounds great to you. As others have said before, don't expect your car to sound like your living room / man cave. However, judicious use of sound deadening material does make listening to your audio system more enjoyable.
 
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