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Tips for disinfecting interior and exterior?

I have chatted with Honda and they have no recommendations. Searching online I have found definitely do not use bleach, but see mixed questions on alcohol.

Any suggestions how to disinfect steering wheel, starter button, gear shift knob, and interior and exterior door handles (painted and chrome)?
 

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Tips for disinfecting interior and exterior?

I have chatted with Honda and they have no recommendations. Searching online I have found definitely do not use bleach, but see mixed questions on alcohol.

Any suggestions how to disinfect steering wheel, starter button, gear shift knob, and interior and exterior door handles (painted and chrome)?
Automotive manufacturers are expected to know how to make their autos. You didn’t seriously expect them to give a recommendation on how to disinfect materials did you, especially right now?
Think of the liability.
 

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I have been using Benzalkonium Chloride hand wipes, professional medical grade, 0.13% BKZ.

I have a couple boxes of professional grade single packs of these wipes, which is what clinics and hospitals use for hand and skin sanitizing. We carry them with us when we are out and sanitize our hands before entering the vehicle. We also have an outer set of clothes that we strip off and put into a bag in the cargo bay before sanitizing hands. We simply assume at this point in time, any place you go, any surface or any person may be contaminated and take precautions accordingly.

The BKZ wipes work well on surfaces too .. since they are mostly water, with 0.13% BKZ. Way better than alcohol wipes or Purell in terms of skin friendly and surface friendly, and just as effective at killing bacteria and virus. I would hesitate to clean my vehicle steering wheel (which is leather wrapped) with anything alcohol based, same for the shifter knob... but if that is all you have.. it is better than not disinfecting.

I scored my BKZ wipes off of Amazon after all the hand sanitizer was already sold out.. and before consumers figured out what hospitals and clinics are using and scarfed them all up too. They are now completely unavailable online as far as I can tell.. but you may find some local stock if you know where to look, and depending on where you are located.

I consider donning gloves to be a bad choice for consumers in the case of coronavirus. You cannot get infected from contact with your hands unless you touch your face. Gloves are simply another layer of "skin" on your hands, which if you touch your face or any surface with gloves on.. it can cause contact transfers as easily as your bare hand can. And even if you did use gloves, you still must fully wash hands with soap and water after removing them.
 

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A commercial Ozone generator like the ones used to get bad smells out of cars should also kill the coronavirus.

Problem is.. ozone is corrosive to many components inside a modern vehicle cabin. It is also harmful to the lungs.

It's fine to do once in a while most likely (as long as you do not inhale the ozone), but not on a regular basis.
 

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Good ideas - gloves especially if you're out and about. None of us want to catch the CarOwner virus!
 

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Tips for disinfecting interior and exterior?

I have chatted with Honda and they have no recommendations. Searching online I have found definitely do not use bleach, but see mixed questions on alcohol.

Any suggestions how to disinfect steering wheel, starter button, gear shift knob, and interior and exterior door handles (painted and chrome)?
Thank you for posting this! I have been wondering the same for nearly a month now. Had a 'to do' on my list to check with Honda but sounds like it's not worth the call now. What a huge disappointment though. You'd think Honda would have anticipated these questions. So what I've been doing is wearing gloves, etc., but also wiping down steering wheel, dashboards, knobs, shifter and my seat with a lysol/water mix and then rinsing and drying. I dread thinking about what this will do over the long run. But I guess that will be a 'first world problem' in the long run. When I get groceries at a curbside pick up, I raise the hatchback of my CR-V and have the store employee put groceries in back of car (or trunk) and then after I 'clean' all those packages in my garage, I wipe down the weather guard floor liner. Honestly, grocery shopping is exhausting anymore! and is a disincentive to leave the house! So there's that! But since there are still a few 'unknowns', I guess it is worth it. If somebody learns anything better, I'm all ears!
 

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I've been using disinfecting wipes on the steering wheel, screen, shift control, and door handles. No problems.... yet.
 

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I have been using Benzalkonium Chloride hand wipes, professional medical grade, 0.13% BKZ.

I have a couple boxes of professional grade single packs of these wipes, which is what clinics and hospitals use for hand and skin sanitizing. We carry them with us when we are out and sanitize our hands before entering the vehicle. We also have an outer set of clothes that we strip off and put into a bag in the cargo bay before sanitizing hands. We simply assume at this point in time, any place you go, any surface or any person may be contaminated and take precautions accordingly.

The BKZ wipes work well on surfaces too .. since they are mostly water, with 0.13% BKZ. Way better than alcohol wipes or Purell in terms of skin friendly and surface friendly, and just as effective at killing bacteria and virus. I would hesitate to clean my vehicle steering wheel (which is leather wrapped) with anything alcohol based, same for the shifter knob... but if that is all you have.. it is better than not disinfecting.

I scored my BKZ wipes off of Amazon after all the hand sanitizer was already sold out.. and before consumers figured out what hospitals and clinics are using and scarfed them all up too. They are now completely unavailable online as far as I can tell.. but you may find some local stock if you know where to look, and depending on where you are located.

I consider donning gloves to be a bad choice for consumers in the case of coronavirus. You cannot get infected from contact with your hands unless you touch your face. Gloves are simply another layer of "skin" on your hands, which if you touch your face or any surface with gloves on.. it can cause contact transfers as easily as your bare hand can. And even if you did use gloves, you still must fully wash hands with soap and water after removing them.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends rubbing on hand sanitizers with at least 60% alcohol when you aren’t able to wash your hands. Huge pumps and multipacks of bottles are flying off store shelves. But “alcohol-free” products — which are not recommended by the CDC — are also getting snatched up in the consumer frenzy.

Some of the hand sanitizers made by the brands Purell and Germ-X rely on benzalkonium chloride instead of alcohol as the active ingredient. Such non-alcohol antiseptic products may not work as well for many types of germs, the CDC says, or may merely reduce the growth of germs rather than killing them. They may be better than nothing, experts say. But people are buying them without knowing the difference.
 

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends rubbing on hand sanitizers with at least 60% alcohol when you aren’t able to wash your hands. Huge pumps and multipacks of bottles are flying off store shelves. But “alcohol-free” products — which are not recommended by the CDC — are also getting snatched up in the consumer frenzy.

Some of the hand sanitizers made by the brands Purell and Germ-X rely on benzalkonium chloride instead of alcohol as the active ingredient. Such non-alcohol antiseptic products may not work as well for many types of germs, the CDC says, or may merely reduce the growth of germs rather than killing them. They may be better than nothing, experts say. But people are buying them without knowing the difference.
You have to be an informed consumer, because CDC is not doing very well over the last several months with their advice. This is the same CDC that says we don't need to wear masks in public too... yet with the understanding now that there can be as many as 25-40-% of infected humans being asymptomatic, yet contagious... and CDC is rethinking their advice here. CDC needs to up their game... a lot. Even the media is misinformed or provocative on a lot of topics COVID-19 related.. and so the proper sources for understanding are government agencies with both experience and test results (for which, sadly, the CDC is not among them at the moment).

Note: The Singapore Health Department on the other hand states that BKZ of 0.05% or higher is effective against COVID-19. Singapore has been on their game with both SARS last decade and in particular COVID-19 recently, and I trust them much more than CDC, unfortunately. Further, CDC is ignoring established research on disinfectants for coronavirus established back in early 2000s specifically to address efficacy for SARS-COV, which COVID-19 is very similar to.. particularly it's protective outer shell. See NIH Finding: Efficacy of various disinfectants against SARS coronavirus. - PubMed - NCBI And NEA has completed and published a list of common disinfectants that are effective on COVID-19, and BKZ of 0.05% or higher is as effective as 70% alcohol. Interim List of Household Products and Active Ingredients for Disinfection of the COVID-19 Virus (and this NEA finding also includes a list of effective brand name products for COVID-19, many of which are BKZ based).

I get the caution by CDC here...because there are indeed a lot of questionable products being produced right now and peddled into a demand market. Many of the alcohol free sanitizers have no virucidal properties at all and are sham products. Consumers need to stick with medically proven and accepted sanitizers.... not just anything that they see on a shelf. CDC also rightly states that alcohol based hand sanitizer is inferior to soap and water and proper washing. In a 1998 study using the FDA protocols for testing, a non-alcohol sanitizer with benzalkonium chloride as the active ingredient met the FDA performance standards, while Purell, a popular alcohol-based sanitizer, did not. In fact FDA prohibits the maker of Purell from making any claims as to it's viral and bacterial disinfecting capabilities to consumers.

Professional grade clinical BKZ handwipes ARE effective virucides when produced with a minimum of 0.13% BKZ.... AND used properly. My MD specifically recommended BKZ @ 0.13% over any brand of alcohol disinfectant, and it is what is used in most medical clinics. It is effective against any virus or bacteria that has a lipid shell that is sensitive to disruption by chemical surficant or soap. COVID-19 is one such virus. BKZ wipes are however not advised for some gram negative bacteria, which seems to be harder for BKZ to cope with.

Alcohol wipes or gels on the other hand are going to degrade/damage a number of different surfaces within a modern CRV cabin, and should be avoided as much as possible. Alcohol is also pretty hard on the skin so if used often it can and will dry out and crack the skin on your hands if you are not careful. The addition of Aloe can help with skin damage to some degree in these alcohol based sanitizers ... but since there are better choices out there..... might as well use them if you can obtain them.
 

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Ive been wesring nitrate gloves in the car when i made my food runs
You must mean "nitrile" gloves, not nitrate. Frankly, unless you have other people (non-family unrelated people like neighbors, etc.) driving your car, why would you have to disinfect your steering wheel, etc.? I can see wiping down your exterior door handle before entering your car because you don't know if someone who was infected touched your door handle when you parked it somewhere, but other than that, they can't get into your car unless the broke into it. If a family member has it, what are they doing driving anyway as they should stay at home and be quarantined? As for wearing the gloves when making "food runs", if you mean take-out food from a restaurant, then I presume after you pick it up, you wipe down all the exterior of the food containers before consumption... but that brings up another question, what if that take-out order has the food contaminated with the virus? Do you know if the food preparer was uninfected? There's just so many points where people fail in their attempt to "keep safe" outside of their homes. There was also a report that the virus can survive on cartons and boxes for days so anything you buy could be contaminated. It seems to me that if your area is not a "hot spot", the odds are likely that none of this is true but if you are really so concerned that you're wearing gloves on "food runs", then doesn't it make more sense to just stay at home and use the food you have in your pantry, etc. instead? If no one in your family has been infected, none of the stuff in your pantry and refrigerator/freezer should be contaminated.

This is like the way that TSA screeners are wearing gloves as they take your ID to verify your identity. Do they wipe their gloves after each passenger? No. So if there was an infected person handing his/her ID to the TSA agent, he takes it then gives it back to them. The next person gives him their ID and he just transferred the virus to that person's ID and so on. So much for mitigating the transmission of the virus to the other passengers. That's why all of this is nonsense. The only person who is protected is the TSA agent with the gloves on. Anyway, enough of my ranting about covid-19 practices.
 

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You must mean "nitrile" gloves, not nitrate. Frankly, unless you have other people (non-family unrelated people like neighbors, etc.) driving your car, why would you have to disinfect your steering wheel, etc.? I can see wiping down your exterior door handle before entering your car because you don't know if someone who was infected touched your door handle when you parked it somewhere, but other than that, they can't get into your car unless the broke into it. If a family member has it, what are they doing driving anyway as they should stay at home and be quarantined? As for wearing the gloves when making "food runs", if you mean take-out food from a restaurant, then I presume after you pick it up, you wipe down all the exterior of the food containers before consumption... but that brings up another question, what if that take-out order has the food contaminated with the virus? Do you know if the food preparer was uninfected? There's just so many points where people fail in their attempt to "keep safe" outside of their homes. There was also a report that the virus can survive on cartons and boxes for days so anything you buy could be contaminated. It seems to me that if your area is not a "hot spot", the odds are likely that none of this is true but if you are really so concerned that you're wearing gloves on "food runs", then doesn't it make more sense to just stay at home and use the food you have in your pantry, etc. instead? If no one in your family has been infected, none of the stuff in your pantry and refrigerator/freezer should be contaminated.

This is like the way that TSA screeners are wearing gloves as they take your ID to verify your identity. Do they wipe their gloves after each passenger? No. So if there was an infected person handing his/her ID to the TSA agent, he takes it then gives it back to them. The next person gives him their ID and he just transferred the virus to that person's ID and so on. So much for mitigating the transmission of the virus to the other passengers. That's why all of this is nonsense. The only person who is protected is the TSA agent with the gloves on. Anyway, enough of my ranting about covid-19 practices.
Cool story.
 

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You must mean "nitrile" gloves, not nitrate. Frankly, unless you have other people (non-family unrelated people like neighbors, etc.) driving your car, why would you have to disinfect your steering wheel, etc.? I can see wiping down your exterior door handle before entering your car because you don't know if someone who was infected touched your door handle when you parked it somewhere, but other than that, they can't get into your car unless the broke into it. If a family member has it, what are they doing driving anyway as they should stay at home and be quarantined? As for wearing the gloves when making "food runs", if you mean take-out food from a restaurant, then I presume after you pick it up, you wipe down all the exterior of the food containers before consumption... but that brings up another question, what if that take-out order has the food contaminated with the virus? Do you know if the food preparer was uninfected? There's just so many points where people fail in their attempt to "keep safe" outside of their homes. There was also a report that the virus can survive on cartons and boxes for days so anything you buy could be contaminated. It seems to me that if your area is not a "hot spot", the odds are likely that none of this is true but if you are really so concerned that you're wearing gloves on "food runs", then doesn't it make more sense to just stay at home and use the food you have in your pantry, etc. instead? If no one in your family has been infected, none of the stuff in your pantry and refrigerator/freezer should be contaminated.

This is like the way that TSA screeners are wearing gloves as they take your ID to verify your identity. Do they wipe their gloves after each passenger? No. So if there was an infected person handing his/her ID to the TSA agent, he takes it then gives it back to them. The next person gives him their ID and he just transferred the virus to that person's ID and so on. So much for mitigating the transmission of the virus to the other passengers. That's why all of this is nonsense. The only person who is protected is the TSA agent with the gloves on. Anyway, enough of my ranting about covid-19 practices.
Yeah gloves are a bad practice for "civillians" simply because it gives them a false sense of security. In reality, gloves are simply a second layer of skin.. and if you don't keep them clean.... they spread viral contact particles just like hands do. Anything a glove touches = a pathway to move viral particles from object to object. This virus invades via mucus membranes and hands have no mucus membranes, but they often visit parts of your body that do.

Plus, gloves sweat up the hands in minutes, which can make them uncomfortable and prone to fidgeting with the gloves.. which is a recipe for spreading anything on the surface of the gloves.

As for virus survival on boxes and cartons.... objective research testing shows that the maximum time virus particles can survive on cardboard is 24 hours. On metal or plastic surfaces though.. it can be up to 72 hours. That said, the charts I have seen show that the decay rate of live virus is linear and in most cases the projected numbers are conservative compared to real life. Since this is an invisible threat with a virus.. the best practice in a pandemic is to assume anything you touch in public IS contaminated and take appropriate sanitation precautions.

As for concern about someone touching the exterior of your vehicle, sunlight alone (even with clouds) will quickly disintegrate the virus due to the UV content of sunlight (clouds do NOT block UV).

Concern about disinfecting the interior goes directly to who may have been in your car. If it is only you the driver, and you practice safe sanitizing practices before entering your vehicle, then you are good. But what if you take your vehicle in for service, and it is returned to you afterward? Do you know who touched what in your vehicle? Did the service center disinfect before returning your vehicle to you (even service centers that claim they do?) You really do not know. So a best practice is to wipe down the steering wheel, shifter, and any buttons you will be pushing with a disinfecting wipe, and when you get home, just leave the vehicle in the sun with the windows closed for the day and let the sun do the work of sanitization via heat.

As for the "only worry if you are located in a hot spot" approach... THAT is exactly how hot spots are propagating from location to location right now in the US. This virus is fairly stealthy, particularly now that research indicates that there are a notable percentage of infected and contagious people moving about that are symptom free.

TL;DR: what you don't know or cannot observe with this virus... in some cases... can cost you or a loved one their lives. So we all need to be overly cautious right now.
 

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Tips for disinfecting interior and exterior?

I have chatted with Honda and they have no recommendations. Searching online I have found definitely do not use bleach, but see mixed questions on alcohol.

Any suggestions how to disinfect steering wheel, starter button, gear shift knob, and interior and exterior door handles (painted and chrome)?
Use alcohol wipes
 

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Tips for disinfecting interior and exterior?

I have chatted with Honda and they have no recommendations. Searching online I have found definitely do not use bleach, but see mixed questions on alcohol.

Any suggestions how to disinfect steering wheel, starter button, gear shift knob, and interior and exterior door handles (painted and chrome)?
Back to the original question ... I think just about any normal cleaning process or cleaning agent will do the job. There is no silver bullet here. After all, conventional soap is good enough for your bare hands. When I took my Pilot in for some service at the Honda dealer 2 weeks ago, all service dept. employees were wearing gloves and they wiped the car handles and steering wheel before turning the car back over to me. To my chagrin, the local Walmart and Sam's Club auto service centers have closed. Part of the justification used was that they did not want to handle and touch consumer's cars.

I wouldn't over think this ... just clean it with what you have. Its better than not cleaning it.
 
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