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I have 2015 crv touring close to 190,000 miles. With regular maintenance at Honda dealer and so far, excellent running and no issues with the car. Should I concern with CVT will break down at some point. Or should I sell it or trade in for new one.
What would you do?
 

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So long as the maintenance is up to date (including TSB software updates), you should be in the realm of traditional Honda reliability.

The Honda CVT is 17% stronger than the old 5 speed transmission (Honda press release), uses fewer parts, and is more efficient -- both fuel efficient and power efficient. The only downside is that the heavy duty steel push belt CVT gets a little warmer than the conventional automatic -- which is why Honda CVTs require fluid changes more often than clutch pack/gear transmissions. However, unlike other CVT designs, the belt is optimized for proper contact -- which results in low belt stress and a high degree of reliability.

Honda designed the new powertrain (engine and transmission) to be able to last as long as the previous generations, but I always like to see real world evidence of this :)
 

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2016 CRV EX-L AWD
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If money is not that big of an issue I would trade in for a new one before any major issues comes up. Note that we typically only buy new cars and keep it for 7-8 years before trading in for a new one. My next car I would avoid CVT and go with something like an 8sp auto. But thats just me.
 

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2013 Honda CR-V EX-L (no navigation)
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Like Honda engineers, I also think that a CVT transmission will last longer than the old planetary automatics. Honda had some very reliable models like the Pilot with their transmission being the weak link and break early. The reputation of the CVTs has been better than the old Honda transmissions.
 
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Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
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The reputation of the CVTs has been better than the old Honda transmissions.
HR-V owners have seen a LOT more failures with CVTs than CR-Vs. (They are enjoying an extended warranty tho') This, in spite of the fact that Honda has used CVTs outside North America since the late 1990s.
 

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2016 CRV Touring AWD
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Suggest you test the waters on resale value and then decide if a new car is for you.
 

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2022 CRV EX FWD 2013 CRV EX FWD
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If it ain't broke why fix it? lol in all seriousness, if you're not having any problems with it I would just keep it. Even if the CVT eventually fails it will be cheaper to replace it than to buy a new car. At least try to get to 200k for fun.
 

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HR-V owners have seen a LOT more failures with CVTs than CR-Vs. (They are enjoying an extended warranty tho') This, in spite of the fact that Honda has used CVTs outside North America since the late 1990s.
To be fair, the HR-V is a relatively new vehicle design. In looking at the parts at Bernardi and comparing them, it sure looks like the HR-V uses a different CVT than the CR-V -- probably not as robust. I am sure that it would have the same issue if it had the older 5 speed automatic -- which is not as robust (handles 17% less torque).

I think the CR-V (and the RDX) will always be a solid vehicle.
 
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