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Not applying force on 4 wheels at the same time. It's just switching from FWD to RWD.
 

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Isn't that what it is supposed to do? It's a front wheel drive in real time, and awd if it detects a slip. That was my understanding, at least. (same as the Rav4 and other models in its class)
 

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Isn't that what it is supposed to do? It's a front wheel drive in real time, and awd if it detects a slip. That was my understanding, at least. (same as the Rav4 and other models in its class)
My understanding as well !! AWD means it has that capability, but will not call on it unless it's needed !! Definitely, not full-time AWD. This begs the question of why the rear fluid needs changing at reasonable intervals when it's just along for the ride a majority of the time !! Craig
 

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Craig, the Honda system works via a differential pump. When both front and rear wheels travel at the same speed, the pump is inactive so only the front wheels drive.

If the front wheels slip, the pump drives the rear wheels. That provides the all wheel drive.

This is a very simplified description. It's a reactive system except on the newest generation. The mechanical components rely on a specific coefficient of friction which is why the diff fluid needs to be replaced periodically.
 

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Craig, the Honda system works via a differential pump. When both front and rear wheels travel at the same speed, the pump is inactive so only the front wheels drive.

If the front wheels slip, the pump drives the rear wheels. That provides the all wheel drive.

This is a very simplified description. It's a reactive system except on the newest generation. The mechanical components rely on a specific coefficient of friction which is why the diff fluid needs to be replaced periodically.
Thanks CB, appreciate the "simplicity" you provide !! They do travel the same speed as long as you go in a perfectly straight line !! As you corner, the outside wheels obviously travel further than the inside ones thus travel faster ?? Physics was not my strength ! Craig.
 

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Not applying force on 4 wheels at the same time. It's just switching from FWD to RWD.
The CR-V is either in Front WD or All WD. It should never be in Rear Wheel drive. That is why I asked how you were perceiving that. My 05 Pilot had a switch to manually engage the AWD under 18mph. The CR-V does not have a switch.
 

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Sporty: The Pilot has a different AWD system. Hate to break it to you but you're not understanding the Pilots system correctly. But let's not mess up this thread by going further.
 

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I wish the crv had the ability to switch it into rwd only, or at least the maximum torque it's able to provide to rear is sent. Would make drifting possible without mashing the gas just to get the front to spin, just to then get rear to spin, so that I can drift.

The 2016 pilot AWD is so good that even if youve turned off traction control the dang thing won't drift, doesn't want to budge! Makes for an awefully accurate path.
 

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In case anybody else is wondering about the dual pump 2 "real time 4wd" system...

With my 2007 CR-V it uses the abs system to simulate a locking front axle, primarily when turning while accelerating in snow. Of course if you're not accelerating the wheels won't spin and the system remains idle. It's fairly effective but has limited use, turn too sharp and it can't compensate enough.

I have not detected any auto braking along the rear axle, likely because it should be breaking the fastest spinning wheel (the one with no/least traction) and that will 99% of time be a front wheel due to the torque split. In fact its basically impossible for a rear wheel to spin very much because the amount of torque sent to the rear is proportional to the difference in front/rear axle speeds. So if the system fakes a limited slip diff in front (forcing axle speed to go constant across all 4 wheels) the rear wheels will receive little to no torque, and thus the abs system will never get to the step of creating an lsd in the rear.

This is why these awd cars do not off road well (compared to a 4x4) but do drive through snow considerably well (compared to 4x4). They're only intended to get you going from a stop, or get you through a larger snow bank such as at end of driveway. It cannot maintain constant torque to all wheels. Note that the VTM-4 and SH-AWD system can maintain constant torque for a period of time, they're truly better than any 4x4. You can win races with a system like that. Their only downfall is overheating, due to the nature of the clutches.
 
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