Honda CR-V Owners Club Forums banner

1 - 20 of 66 Posts

Registered
Joined
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Apologies in advance if I'm asking something that may have already been covered...

I've owned Hondas almost exclusively for 30 years... 8 of them in total.

Last week my wife bought a 2020 CRV AWD LX.

And I drive a 2017 CR-V AWD LX (2.3 engine). We bought both of these vehicles new, 3 year apart.

Now that we each own 5th Generation CR-Vs, I thought I would "get serious" about learning more about the changes over the years.

The most alarming revelation was the CVT Transmission. For the past 3 years I've simply understood it as an "Automatic", and went about my business. I've owned Honndas w/ manual transmissions for years (and never replaced a clutch). I've owned Automatics that have been equally problem-free. But now we're into the brave new world of the CVT. We aren't manic, aggressive drivers, so we haven't experienced any of the oddities that others have reported under those driving conditions. They've just felt like really smooth, comfortable transmissions, and to date I've just thought "man Honda keeps improving the ride!"....

And then.... I read that, generally, the average lifespan of a CVT is 100k! Say what? Are you kiddng me? I've driven other non-CVT Hondas WAY longer than 100K, with ZERO transmission issues!!!!

So my question is, how "average" is that for Honda? Anyone out there driving a CVT with 150k and no issues?

Can I extend the life of a CVT by driving solely in "ECON mode", and taking it really easy all the time?
 

Registered
Joined
1,001 Posts
ECON mode wont do diddly-squat other than make the engine lethargic in the (poor) pursuit of some lukewarm fuel efficiency.

As to the CVT, as long as the essential maintenance is completed as per Honda instructions, that 100K lifespan "average" simply will not apply. It will soldier on for a LOT longer.

Dont forget - this is a Honda. Not some German junk made on a Friday afternoon. Treated properly, CVTs will go on for more than double that 100K "average" lifespan nonsense 馃憣
 

Registered
Joined
299 Posts
So far people haven't been reporting CVT failures on Hondas.

Honda has been building CVTs for a long time and seems to be doing it better than most others.

Some manufacturers don't build there own transmissions, both CVT and regular automatics. There is a transmission supplier that is known for building units that fail long before they should, again both types.

I've had 4 vehicles with CVTs, none have experienced any problems.

Our company fleet has quite a few, they put about 125,000 miles on them before turning them in. No failures have been reported.
 

Registered
Joined
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
ECON mode wont do diddly-squat other than make the engine lethargic in the (poor) pursuit of some lukewarm fuel efficiency.

As to the CVT, as long as the essential maintenance is completed as per Honda instructions, that 100K lifespan "average" simply will not apply. It will soldier on for a LOT longer.

Dont forget - this is a Honda. Not some German junk made on a Friday afternoon. Treated properly, CVTs will go on for more than double that 100K "average" lifespan nonsense 馃憣
THANK YOU!!! Sincerely. This makes my anxiety settle down. Time for fennel tea.
Also - last night I used ECON on a gig commute of 226 miles (first gig in 14 weeks..felt great) and I averaged 33.3 MPG. Seems pretty good ?
 

Registered
Joined
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
So far people haven't been reporting CVT failures on Hondas.

Honda has been building CVTs for a long time and seems to be doing it better than most others.

Some manufacturers don't build there own transmissions, both CVT and regular automatics. There is a transmission supplier that is known for building units that fail long before they should, again both types.

I've had 4 vehicles with CVTs, none have experienced any problems.

Our company fleet has quite a few, they put about 125,000 miles on them before turning them in. No failures have been reported.
AWESOME!!! thank you
 

Registered
Joined
1,001 Posts
THANK YOU!!! Sincerely. This makes my anxiety settle down. Time for fennel tea.
Also - last night I used ECON on a gig commute of 226 miles (first gig in 14 weeks..felt great) and I averaged 33.3 MPG. Seems pretty good ?
I've found that I can get the same or better gas-mileage from my 1.5T CVT without using the ECON button, than if I did use it.

Its just about driving sensibly and not pressing the "fast" pedal too often needlessly.

In any case, as mentioned upthread, Honda seems to get slated in the (braindead) press over pseudo-loud CVTs.

But when did you ever see/hear of these same motoring moron fake-news journo's reporting a Honda CVT failure? Thats right, because they either simply do NOT happen, or the numbers are so small, they are never picked up. Honda's CVT's are, for all intents and purposes - f-ing awesome.
 

Registered
Joined
359 Posts
THANK YOU!!! Sincerely. This makes my anxiety settle down. Time for fennel tea.
Also - last night I used ECON on a gig commute of 226 miles (first gig in 14 weeks..felt great) and I averaged 33.3 MPG. Seems pretty good ?
Yes, that's within the expected MPG range if you don't hot rod the engine. The debate goes on and on about the ECON mode but IME, it can give you an improvement of 1 MPG on the hwy. I experimented with ECON mode for a while after I bought my Gen 5. ECON is a bit sluggish in town unless you are super light footed driver by nature. I only use it if I am going to do some considerable freeway/hwy driving and when I do, it consistently rewards me with a 1 MPG gain.
 

Registered
Joined
135 Posts
This is a Honda CVT -- not a typical CVT. Honda did learn a few things from their first generation CVT -- and how to use a torque converter instead of a start clutch -- as well as building more rings in the ring packs in order to make the transmission stronger than the 5-speed it replaced. To me, the transmission definitely feels like it is stronger. Just remember that there are no cooling lines running to it [like the automatic], so you'll need to change the fluid every 2 years or 25,000 miles in order to keep the fluid fresh. I haven't figured out why the engineers didn't put in a trans and oil cooler -- or at least run the lines for them, but Honda engineers have advanced degrees in engineering and know what they're doing.
 

Registered
Joined
1,001 Posts
Best bit about Honda's CVT's is that they do "feel" like auto's - I find the paddle shifting makes for great progress. Combined with the turbo engine, its a very sweet combination indeed!
 

Registered
Joined
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I've found that I can get the same or better gas-mileage from my 1.5T CVT without using the ECON button, than if I did use it.
that's good to know for my wife's 2020 LX. My '17 has the 2.4 base engine... I'll have to do some experimenting as I have never even thought of using the ECON button until now.
I wonder why they did away with the 2.4 and made the 1.5 the stock engine for all levels鈥
 

Registered
Joined
1,638 Posts
Best bit about Honda's CVT's is that they do "feel" like auto's - I find the paddle shifting makes for great progress. Combined with the turbo engine, its a very sweet combination indeed!
Paddle shifting? Oh yeah, another UK exclusive? US drivers don't need no stinking paddles! :D

Oh, I do have paddles on my Acura RDX! Hmmm
 

Registered
Joined
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Just remember that there are no cooling lines running to it [like the automatic], so you'll need to change the fluid every 2 years or 25,000 miles in order to keep the fluid fresh. I haven't figured out why the engineers didn't put in a trans and oil cooler -- or at least run the lines for them, but Honda engineers have advanced degrees in engineering and know what they're doing.
This is helpful info, thanks. I assume this rule of thumb applies to all generation 5 CR-Vs?
 

Registered
Joined
17 Posts
This is a Honda CVT -- not a typical CVT. Honda did learn a few things from their first generation CVT -- and how to use a torque converter instead of a start clutch -- as well as building more rings in the ring packs in order to make the transmission stronger than the 5-speed it replaced. To me, the transmission definitely feels like it is stronger. Just remember that there are no cooling lines running to it [like the automatic], so you'll need to change the fluid every 2 years or 25,000 miles in order to keep the fluid fresh. I haven't figured out why the engineers didn't put in a trans and oil cooler -- or at least run the lines for them, but Honda engineers have advanced degrees in engineering and know what they're doing.
There is a transmission cooler, look behind the air cleaner housing, straight down and you will see it. Has two coolant lines connected to it. Not like they used to be, this one is mounted to the transmission with engine coolant plumbed to it. Nice set up.
 

Registered
Joined
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Not to rub salt in the wound etc, but the paddles are bloody brilliant! 馃榿
before we bought the 2020 CR-V for my bride, i test drove a 2020 Honda Fit, top-end with the cameras and the paddle shifters (and probably a waffle iron and a table saw included)...
I hadn't ever tried paddle shifters....suffice it to say, that was a fun test drive...i had an '08 Fit for a few years, but sold it when the child came along. My wife thought I was nuts considering another one at this stage. I called it a Covid-Crisis. After a night of sleep, I realised the CR-V was still the way to go. I took on her '17 and she got the new '20.
 

Registered
Joined
2,936 Posts
Honda does have some issues over the years with some subsystems in the CRV... but CVTs doe not appear to be one of them.

FACT: Honda cut their teeth on CVTs making them for Formula 1 powertrains... before they were prohibited by F1 rule changes and before they were proliferated across consumer vehicles. Formula 1 is where manufacturers learn to make reliable high performance powertrains... because F1 limits the number of powertrains that a team can use in a season. So.. among a range of things that you design for in the F1 circuit... reliability and endurance is always high on the list. And Honda is the only major manufacturer of mainstream value based consumer vehicles.. that also plays strongly in the F1 circuit. Even the current generation hybrids by Honda have their roots in Hondas design of hybrid F1 powertrains.
 
1 - 20 of 66 Posts
Top