Honda CR-V Owners Club Forums banner

21 - 40 of 66 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #21
One other CVT inquiry here: up until 2 weeks ago, my main ride was a 3rd Gen 2011 CRV LX. The automatic transmission had a button on the side of the shifter that would prevent the transmission from going any higher than 3rd gear. When we got the 5th Gen CR-V, we noticed the button was no longer present on the shifter. Instead, there's a letter S below letter D, called "Sport Mode". I asked the salesman if "Sport Mode" was the same as hitting the D3 button on my 2011 shifter. He said "That's not really what this is" without fully explaining the difference. I've looked up Sport Mode, and I've tried it, so I get the obvious feel difference. I'm still longing for a comparative explanation of the difference between D3 and Sport Mode. Anyone want to take a crack at it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
359 Posts
One other CVT inquiry here: up until 2 weeks ago, my main ride was a 3rd Gen 2011 CRV LX. The automatic transmission had a button on the side of the shifter that would prevent the transmission from going any higher than 3rd gear. When we got the 5th Gen CR-V, we noticed the button was no longer present on the shifter. Instead, there's a letter S below letter D, called "Sport Mode". I asked the salesman if "Sport Mode" was the same as hitting the D3 button on my 2011 shifter. He said "That's not really what this is" without fully explaining the difference. I've looked up Sport Mode, and I've tried it, so I get the obvious feel difference. I'm still longing for a comparative explanation of the difference between D3 and Sport Mode. Anyone want to take a crack at it?
If I understand Sport Mode correctly, it keeps the engine RPMs in the max power zone when the gas pedal is depressed. D3 was like driving in 3rd gear which simply did not allow the trans to shift into a higher gear but it allowed the trans to run in the two lower gears as the RPMs required.

It's hard to compare a CVT to an auto trans. They are worlds apart.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
if you visit the sister board for the HRV there were some cvt tranny failures when they got up to 75-100 k on some of the 2016's .


I dont find much of a difference between the feel of the cvt on my new gen 5 verses the gen 4 I just finished leasing .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Changing the fluid is not enough for maintenance. Both filters need to be changed as well as cleaning the magnets that are inside the pan. That material on the drain plug magnet is from 19k miles from an 80 year old driver.
962DD3A8-99A6-4989-A342-A73838B2B6DD.jpeg
682D67AB-5E31-42A5-A19F-323BD35B1750.jpeg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #25 (Edited)
I've just scoured the owner's manual for my 2017 AWD LX, and there isn't a single word about when to change the transmission fluid under normal driving. Checking the index, Honda supplied no entry for "Automatic Transmission" or "Transmission"; no entry for "CVT" or "Continuously Variable Transmission".... and under "Maintenance", there isn't a single sentence about regular fluid changes in the CVT whatsoever. They do write about driving in "mountainous areas at low vehicle speeds" or "towing a trailer" - indicating a 25k change if regularly driving under those conditions. What about NORMAL driving? CVT fluid is mentioned under "specifications", where it describes the capacities for 2WD & AWD models - but nothing about when to change the fluid. Isn't this odd?!??!!!! I have 30,000 miles on this car, and there hasn't been a single code pop up about changing the tranny fluid. You folks are saying do it at 25,000. That was 5,000 miles ago. What is with Honda not specifying exactly when to change it for non-mountainous drivers who never have towed a trailer?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
299 Posts
Change it whenever you think it should be changed.

I'll probably change mine early, but it's not something I lose sleep over.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,936 Posts
If I understand Sport Mode correctly, it keeps the engine RPMs in the max power zone when the gas pedal is depressed. D3 was like driving in 3rd gear which simply did not allow the trans to shift into a higher gear but it allowed the trans to run in the two lower gears as the RPMs required.

It's hard to compare a CVT to an auto trans. They are worlds apart.
Prior to the incorporation of CVTs into CRVs... the old gear shifting automatic transmissions were 3 speed with an overdrive 4th gear. The driver had control over whether the 4th gear for overdrive was enabled or not. Generally, for freeway driving, you wanted overdrive enabled to reduce the ongoing rpm demand on the engine.

With the emergence of CVTs in CRVs, which are highly electronically controlled along with the rest of the powertrain, it pretty much takes care of itself automatically. The ability of the driver to switch to ECO or to Sport being the only real adjustments available and their function is pretty clear by their naming conventions.

The real challenge with CVTs for vehicle manufacturers has been getting an engine profile that will provide what CVTs LOVE --> lots of torque at lower engine rpms. With the gen5 CRV and the new 1.5T engines.... Honda essentially solved the challenge... providing a very robust and almost flat torque band from 1800-rpm all the way to redline. This enables the CVT to purr along doing what it is supposed to do.. with no need for the driver to race the accelerator just to push engine rpms high in order to reach the torque band hidden at higher rpm on earlier engines (like the 2.4L).

Interestingly... Honda still refuses to pair a CVT with their older V6s still used in Pilot, Oddessy, etc. Same with the new high performance 2.0T 4 cylinder that Honda has released to replace the use of V6s in performance Accords.... sticking to either a 10 speed automatic or in some configurations a manual transmission. My guess is Honda... always conservative with their consumer production powertrains does not yet feel they have a CVT that will hold up under the demands of the 2.0T and the older V6s.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,936 Posts
I've just scoured the owner's manual for my 2017 AWD LX, and there isn't a single word about when to change the transmission fluid under normal driving. Checking the index, Honda supplied no entry for "Automatic Transmission" or "Transmission"; no entry for "CVT" or "Continuously Variable Transmission".... and under "Maintenance", there isn't a single sentence about regular fluid changes in the CVT whatsoever. They do write about driving in "mountainous areas at low vehicle speeds" or "towing a trailer" - indicating a 25k change if regularly driving under those conditions. What about NORMAL driving? CVT fluid is mentioned under "specifications", where it describes the capacities for 2WD & AWD models - but nothing about when to change the fluid. Isn't this odd?!??!!!! I have 30,000 miles on this car, and there hasn't been a single code pop up about changing the tranny fluid. You folks are saying do it at 25,000. That was 5,000 miles ago. What is with Honda not specifying exactly when to change it for non-mountainous drivers who never have towed a trailer?
Honestly.. most fluids in Hondas no longer have a mileage or time trigger for maintenance.... relying instead on the intelligence of the Maintenance Minder. Even for a fluid that is strictly time based, like the brake fluid, which Honda says needs replacement every 36 months, is tracked and flagged by the Maintenance Minder automatically and will pop a code into the next oil service window accordingly.

Trust your Maintenance Minder in the Gen5 CRV. It is smart enough to keep track of almost all regular maintenance schedules, including calculating load conditions that would trigger a need for an earlier fluid change than normal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,936 Posts
if you visit the sister board for the HRV there were some cvt tranny failures when they got up to 75-100 k on some of the 2016's .


I dont find much of a difference between the feel of the cvt on my new gen 5 verses the gen 4 I just finished leasing .
The stock engine for the HRVs sucks for mating to a CVT. So it does not surprise me that there may be some reported issues with the CVT in that vehicle line. Same issue carried over from the FIT line, which the HRV is built upon. The first generation HRV uses an engine not well tuned for mating to a CVT... making the vehicle feel underpowered and constantly racing to find a sweet spot for the CVT while driving.

I suspect with the next refresh of the HRV.. we may very well see a brand new torque rich low rpm 1.3T engine released for it. That assumes that the next gen HRV is not simply moved directly to Hondas modern hybrid approach to a powertrain. Could also be the HRV becomes one of the first Hondas to go 100% non GDI in terms of powertrain. I do know that if the HRV is redesigned to provide much better driving power while keeping the fuel economy, and better noise management in the cabin... the HRV could become an industry leader in the subcompact SUV/CUV market segment.

AS for difference in feel of the CVT between gen4 and gen5.... for the 2.4L engine.. I would expect no perceivable differences at all. For the 1.5T in the gen5 though... it drives quite differently compared to my gen3 (I have not driven a gen4 so no personal experience). The gen5 is much crisper and more responsive, and at lower rpms (except when in the silly limp ECO mode.. which is wasted on the 1.5T in my view).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #30
Trust your Maintenance Minder in the Gen5 CRV. It is smart enough to keep track of almost all regular maintenance schedules, including calculating load conditions that would trigger a need for an earlier fluid change than normal.
Thanks - ...... i'm used to just making sure the maintenance is done & written down on paper...so relying on the computer feedback is a bit unnerving, but, if enough folks are doing well by Honda computers, I will try to brighten my orb of trust!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
359 Posts
Prior to the incorporation of CVTs into CRVs... the old gear shifting automatic transmissions were 3 speed with an overdrive 4th gear. The driver had control over whether the 4th gear for overdrive was enabled or not. Generally, for freeway driving, you wanted overdrive enabled to reduce the ongoing rpm demand on the engine.

With the emergence of CVTs in CRVs, which are highly electronically controlled along with the rest of the powertrain, it pretty much takes care of itself automatically. The ability of the driver to switch to ECO or to Sport being the only real adjustments available and their function is pretty clear by their naming conventions.

The real challenge with CVTs for vehicle manufacturers has been getting an engine profile that will provide what CVTs LOVE --> lots of torque at lower engine rpms. With the gen5 CRV and the new 1.5T engines.... Honda essentially solved the challenge... providing a very robust and almost flat torque band from 1800-rpm all the way to redline. This enables the CVT to purr along doing what it is supposed to do.. with no need for the driver to race the accelerator just to push engine rpms high in order to reach the torque band hidden at higher rpm on earlier engines (like the 2.4L).

Interestingly... Honda still refuses to pair a CVT with their older V6s still used in Pilot, Oddessy, etc. Same with the new high performance 2.0T 4 cylinder that Honda has released to replace the use of V6s in performance Accords.... sticking to either a 10 speed automatic or in some configurations a manual transmission. My guess is Honda... always conservative with their consumer production powertrains does not yet feel they have a CVT that will hold up under the demands of the 2.0T and the older V6s.
It’s my understanding that CVTs are not gutsy like geared transmissions are. You generally don’t see CVTs in high output/performance vehicles because the bands in a CVT will slip if they are pushed too hard. They seem to have been adopted for smaller economy vehicles with lower power ratings than larger vehicles.
 

·
Registered
2014 CR-V 2.0 Lifestyle
Joined
·
775 Posts
Paddle shifting? Oh yeah, another UK exclusive? US drivers don't need no stinking paddles! :D
Europeans stick paddles onto everything. Even my minivan has them. The only difference is that CR-V paddles are located on the steering wheel spokes, so turn with the wheel but the minivan's are on the column, tho a lot larger:

139880



LOL! I do blame the USA, I do!
I guess as most CR-V sold in Europe are configured near premium our regional distributors have ticked the "shift paddles" check mark in the ordering form by default.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
For me it’s just a ratio of how long you intended to keep a vehicle. I’ve had 3 cars that I put a minimum of 330k on. If I was offing them off at under a 100k, I wouldn’t be as anal about changing fluids other than engine oil.
For me, since I keep vehicles longer than warranty, if I spend a $200 every 15-20k miles servicing my transmission and differentials myself, I’m good with that.
A CVT is a metal belt between sets of cone pulleys rubbing back and forth to change ratio It does wear, releasing material into the oil.
Honda did a good job at providing magnets and two stages of filtration to help keep the oil clean, but since I’m a user that keeps cars for at least 15 years, I change fluids more often.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,637 Posts
Excellent way to look at things, and description. Thank you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,936 Posts
It’s my understanding that CVTs are not gutsy like geared transmissions are. You generally don’t see CVTs in high output/performance vehicles because the bands in a CVT will slip if they are pushed too hard. They seem to have been adopted for smaller economy vehicles with lower power ratings than larger vehicles.
I generally agree with you on that point, and apparently Hondas conservative engineers agree, at least currently on the 2.0T.

However there was a period in Formula 1 when the Williams race team perfected and tested a CVT in their F1 platforms.. long before CVTs became common on consumer vehicles. Honda also did work testing CVTs in F1 as well. Then.. the ruling body freaked out about the performance advantages being demonstrated with CVTs and F1 rules were rewritten to make CVTs illegal, not due to reliability or safety concerns, but because the Williams CVT decoupled F1 driving from engine rpms.... since CVTs are largely torque driven and demonstrated a clear advantage on an F1 style track. F1 Technique: Williams tested a CVT transmission back in 1993 (+video) | Car News | Auto123

I can see why F1 made CVTs illegal though .... as F1 has always been about putting driver skill and performance ahead of technology, and they generally frown on any team going "rogue" with new and innovative technology that they feel gives too much advantage from technology over driver .. so they keep the teams and their suppliers on a pretty short leash. The CVT was apparently a bridge too far in performance advantage of the driving platform, at least the one fielded by the Williams team. F1 banned technologies over the years: 10 Technologies Banned from Formula One Racing

Separately... in the context of this topic and the original posters concerns... it seems Honda is reputedly the most reliable CVT producer right now in the industry. How Long Do CVT Transmissions Last? Facts and Fallacies!
2. Which CVT Transmission Brand Is The Most Reliable?
The Honda models with the CVT are the most reliable among all the lineups and CVT transmission life expectancy is the longest. However, the automakers have been working relentlessly to improve the technology. Almost all the newer models of the brands are better than their predecessors.
That said.. I do not know what broad data shows regarding reliability of CVTs vs multi-gear automatics in Hondas. My guess.. both approaches by Honda are quite reliable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Well CVT’s are not in F1 and F1 is not about reliability except for 5 races for powertrain. They do have powertrain limits but dual clutch transmissions are beyond CVT except they are not a 300k mile tranny either.
The OP was wanting to know how to maintain the CVT for longevity on their daily driver.
Porsche, Mercedes, Lamborghini, Ferrari do not use CVT for performance. High performance snowmobiles that are producing 200 hp carry a spare belt.
CVT are about fuel mileage and for now not about High horsepower performance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
632 Posts
Actually, one of the big reasons for the Formula One, governing body forbidding CVT’s, is because they feared the certain drop in money paying fans, due to the terrible noise a CVT F1 engine makes. F1 fans want the sight of speed, smell of race fuel, and the sound of up, and down shifting race car engines.
Imagine the joy of listening to a bunch of extremely loud table saws, cutting plywood for 2 hours.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #38
For me it’s just a ratio of how long you intended to keep a vehicle. I’ve had 3 cars that I put a minimum of 330k on. If I was offing them off at under a 100k, I wouldn’t be as anal about changing fluids other than engine oil.
For me, since I keep vehicles longer than warranty, if I spend a $200 every 15-20k miles servicing my transmission and differentials myself, I’m good with that.
A CVT is a metal belt between sets of cone pulleys rubbing back and forth to change ratio It does wear, releasing material into the oil.
Honda did a good job at providing magnets and two stages of filtration to help keep the oil clean, but since I’m a user that keeps cars for at least 15 years, I change fluids more often.
Good policy!
 

·
Registered
2020 CR-V EX-L Hybrid
Joined
·
13 Posts
Honestly.. most fluids in Hondas no longer have a mileage or time trigger for maintenance.... relying instead on the intelligence of the Maintenance Minder. Even for a fluid that is strictly time based, like the brake fluid, which Honda says needs replacement every 36 months, is tracked and flagged by the Maintenance Minder automatically and will pop a code into the next oil service window accordingly.

Trust your Maintenance Minder in the Gen5 CRV. It is smart enough to keep track of almost all regular maintenance schedules, including calculating load conditions that would trigger a need for an earlier fluid change than normal.
Was going to say this as well. Honda has developed a pretty slick maintenance minder system that monitors just about everything and tells you what needs to be done and it is all calculated by how you drive the car and all the data it collects while the car is in operation. There is no need to worry or panic. It will tell you what to do and at the right time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #40
Was going to say this as well. Honda has developed a pretty slick maintenance minder system that monitors just about everything and tells you what needs to be done and it is all calculated by how you drive the car and all the data it collects while the car is in operation. There is no need to worry or panic. It will tell you what to do and at the right time.
Thank you. Looks like you also have the Modern Steel Metallic... same color as the one we just bought last week! Very nice.
 
21 - 40 of 66 Posts
Top