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The CVT transmission I bought a 2012, I wanted the k24 engine and a real 5 speed trans, last real trans was 2014
 

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I always come to a complete stop before shifting the transmission into either drive or reverse. There is a slight hesitation before the transmission shifts into gear, which I wait for. Hopefully the transmission will last longer if this is followed.
 

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This is a Honda CVT -- not a typical CVT. Honda did learn a few things from their first generation CVT -- and how to use a torque converter instead of a start clutch -- as well as building more rings in the ring packs in order to make the transmission stronger than the 5-speed it replaced. To me, the transmission definitely feels like it is stronger. Just remember that there are no cooling lines running to it [like the automatic], so you'll need to change the fluid every 2 years or 25,000 miles in order to keep the fluid fresh. I haven't figured out why the engineers didn't put in a trans and oil cooler -- or at least run the lines for them, but Honda engineers have advanced degrees in engineering and know what they're doing.
Yes, but they are ruled by accountants....
 

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I've just scoured the owner's manual for my 2017 AWD LX, and there isn't a single word about when to change the transmission fluid under normal driving. Checking the index, Honda supplied no entry for "Automatic Transmission" or "Transmission"; no entry for "CVT" or "Continuously Variable Transmission".... and under "Maintenance", there isn't a single sentence about regular fluid changes in the CVT whatsoever. They do write about driving in "mountainous areas at low vehicle speeds" or "towing a trailer" - indicating a 25k change if regularly driving under those conditions. What about NORMAL driving? CVT fluid is mentioned under "specifications", where it describes the capacities for 2WD & AWD models - but nothing about when to change the fluid. Isn't this odd?!??!!!! I have 30,000 miles on this car, and there hasn't been a single code pop up about changing the tranny fluid. You folks are saying do it at 25,000. That was 5,000 miles ago. What is with Honda not specifying exactly when to change it for non-mountainous drivers who never have towed a trailer?
I have a 2016 EX with 50k miles on it, and I usually do my own maintenance. So, I asked some of the techs, and the assistant service manager at my local Honda dealer (I know them pretty well, since we've bonded, since I almost became tech myself years ago), and they recommended changing the CVT fluid every 30k miles, and rear differential fluid every 15k miles. But, I thought every 15k for the rear diff. fluid was ridiculous. Before this 2016, I had a 1st 1/2 gen. 2001 LX. I used to change the automatic transmission, and rear diff. together at 30k miles. I plan on doing the same on this one, and I strongly feel that would be a safe bet on any of these newer ones.
 

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I have a 2016 EX with 50k miles on it, and I usually do my own maintenance. So, I asked some of the techs, and the assistant service manager at my local Honda dealer (I know them pretty well, since we've bonded, since I almost became tech myself years ago), and they recommended changing the CVT fluid every 30k miles, and rear differential fluid every 15k miles. But, I thought every 15k for the rear diff. fluid was ridiculous. Before this 2016, I had a 1st 1/2 gen. 2001 LX. I used to change the automatic transmission, and rear diff. together at 30k miles. I plan on doing the same on this one, and I strongly feel that would be a safe bet on any of these newer ones.
Perhaps they have bonded with your wallet?
 

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Apologies in advance if I'm asking something that may have already been covered...

I've owned Hondas almost exclusively for 30 years... 8 of them in total.

Last week my wife bought a 2020 CRV AWD LX.

And I drive a 2017 CR-V AWD LX (2.3 engine). We bought both of these vehicles new, 3 year apart.

Now that we each own 5th Generation CR-Vs, I thought I would "get serious" about learning more about the changes over the years.

The most alarming revelation was the CVT Transmission. For the past 3 years I've simply understood it as an "Automatic", and went about my business. I've owned Honndas w/ manual transmissions for years (and never replaced a clutch). I've owned Automatics that have been equally problem-free. But now we're into the brave new world of the CVT. We aren't manic, aggressive drivers, so we haven't experienced any of the oddities that others have reported under those driving conditions. They've just felt like really smooth, comfortable transmissions, and to date I've just thought "man Honda keeps improving the ride!"....

And then.... I read that, generally, the average lifespan of a CVT is 100k! Say what? Are you kiddng me? I've driven other non-CVT Hondas WAY longer than 100K, with ZERO transmission issues!!!!

So my question is, how "average" is that for Honda? Anyone out there driving a CVT with 150k and no issues?

Can I extend the life of a CVT by driving solely in "ECON mode", and taking it really easy all the time?
Well I would hope last much longer than 100k. I had a Prius with a CVT before I got my 20 CRV and over 217 k miles before totaled in accident.,0 issues with cvt. Would think Honda just as good. I worked at a Honda dealer from 97 to 2007, saw quite a bite trans failures but no cvt to my remembrance.,
 

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Europeans stick paddles onto everything. Even my minivan has them. The only difference is that CR-V paddles are located on the steering wheel spokes, so turn with the wheel but the minivan's are on the column, tho a lot larger:

View attachment 139880
Just another gimmick that most people will never use, and a lot won’t even know they have it. Not sure how they work on cvt too.



I guess as most CR-V sold in Europe are configured near premium our regional distributors have ticked the "shift paddles" check mark in the ordering form by default.
 

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Just another gimmick that most people will never use, and a lot won’t even know they have it. Not sure how they work on cvt too.
I sometimes do, when towing or in extreme slippery conditions. They work in a CVT just like they do on a regular automatic as there are number of pre-determined ratios it hits.
 

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Just another gimmick that most people will never use, and a lot won’t even know they have it. Not sure how they work on cvt too
Disagree.

Far from a gimmick at all.

The paddles work exceptionally well and I use them all the time. They work just like they do on an old-school auto transmission.
 

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Apologies in advance if I'm asking something that may have already been covered...

I've owned Hondas almost exclusively for 30 years... 8 of them in total.

Last week my wife bought a 2020 CRV AWD LX.

And I drive a 2017 CR-V AWD LX (2.3 engine). We bought both of these vehicles new, 3 year apart.

Now that we each own 5th Generation CR-Vs, I thought I would "get serious" about learning more about the changes over the years.

The most alarming revelation was the CVT Transmission. For the past 3 years I've simply understood it as an "Automatic", and went about my business. I've owned Honndas w/ manual transmissions for years (and never replaced a clutch). I've owned Automatics that have been equally problem-free. But now we're into the brave new world of the CVT. We aren't manic, aggressive drivers, so we haven't experienced any of the oddities that others have reported under those driving conditions. They've just felt like really smooth, comfortable transmissions, and to date I've just thought "man Honda keeps improving the ride!"....

And then.... I read that, generally, the average lifespan of a CVT is 100k! Say what? Are you kiddng me? I've driven other non-CVT Hondas WAY longer than 100K, with ZERO transmission issues!!!!

So my question is, how "average" is that for Honda? Anyone out there driving a CVT with 150k and no issues?

Can I extend the life of a CVT by driving solely in "ECON mode", and taking it really easy all the time?
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Is there a chart listing months/mileage maintenance required. Manual on 2018 does not have one. I didn't know about the Transmission Fluid at 25K. Waiting for pop up reminders or reading the entire book isn't a planning stragegy.
 

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Have CVT and paddle shifters on my Forester. I use them daily for "downshifting". I drove a manual transmission for a decade so it feels very natural to work the paddles.
 

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So the US top trim CRV doesnt get paddles?

Freakin outrageous.
And the US version doesn't even get the panoramic roof that our neighbors in Canada get. Honda always lags other brands with features like that in the US for some crazy reason. Toyota, and Hyundai for example all offer a pano roof in the US. Why Honda doesn't at least offer an "Elite" trim with these features in the US mood boggling.
 

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And the US version doesn't even get the panoramic roof that our neighbors in Canada get. Honda always lags other brands with features like that in the US for some crazy reason. Toyota, and Hyundai for example all offer a pano roof in the US. Why Honda doesn't at least offer an "Elite" trim with these features in the US mood boggling.
Our dealer explained it to me once. The local distributor has to allocate production slots in the factory a year in advance and have to stick to it. They have to decide which configurations they are able to sell and need to market them as well. As the CR-V has remained somewhat utilitarian in image on the US market they cannot afford all the premium features because they can't sell them. Acura has always been the premium "Honda" so the have made the clear distinction between the two product lines. So it's just plain business.
 

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Our dealer explained it to me once. The local distributor has to allocate production slots in the factory a year in advance and have to stick to it. They have to decide which configurations they are able to sell and need to market them as well. As the CR-V has remained somewhat utilitarian in image on the US market they cannot afford all the premium features because they can't sell them. Acura has always been the premium "Honda" so the have made the clear distinction between the two product lines. So it's just plain business.
How does Toyota offer these features even with their Lexus brand? And the Elite Pilot features doesn't take sales away from the MDX. It just doesn't make sense, give how intense the small SUV market has become that Honda does compete with more features on their CR-V.
 

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How does Toyota offer these features even with their Lexus brand? And the Elite Pilot features doesn't take sales away from the MDX. It just doesn't make sense, give how intense the small SUV market has become that Honda does compete with more features on their CR-V.
I have no idea.
 
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