Honda CR-V Owners Club Forums banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of this month's Ride of the Month Challenge!

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi. Owner of 2018. Here's email I just sent to Honda (local dealer and corporate):

"Thought you should know about recent experience with the 2018 CR-V we bought from Della a few months ago. It’s a 2-parter...

We returned to Plattsburgh International Airport from 3 wk vacation early Monday morning…landing at 3AM. It was cold and rainy, I headed across the huge parking lot to get the car, leaving wife sick and sitting uncomfortably with luggage in all-but-deserted terminal.

Car wouldn’t start. Inconvenient, but not terribly surprising after 3 weeks of sitting idle. Back again across the parking lot to get phone from wife to call Roadside Assistance, then back to car yet again to get VIN, called 866 number. After much information collected by “Sherry”, she assured me - apologetically - that a mechanic would be there to help…within 3 hours!! Of course I couldn’t sit in a freezing vehicle, or leave an ill wife sitting in a deserted terminal, until whatever time the mechanic chose to show up. Yet, if I called taxi for motel, how would I know when the mechanic would be there? Fortunately, there was a young man manning the toll gate, about to head home from his shift. He offered to give me a jump. In the process, he told me that the mechanic contracted by Honda had a “reputation for being undependable”. I don’t know the intricacies of how Honda contracts for Roadside Assistance, but you should know that this was the first time we have ever called for Roadside Assistance for a Della vehicle, and it was totally useless. I don’t know if you’ve had previous complaints from customers, but if Della & Honda use this service as a selling point for vehicles, they should make sure it’s definitely available to help owners in a dependable, timely fashion.
The car was parked in such a way that the cables couldn’t reach, and needed to be pushed a few feet back, but of course the transmission was locked. Again, fortunately the young employee knew about a 'slot next to the gear shift' - covered by a very small piece of black plastic - that could free it up so I could shift into neutral. It was a critical piece of knowledge for which I was totally ignorant. We were ultimately able to shift into neutral, push the car, and jump-start it successfully. I have since looked just about everywhere (manual and online) for consumer info on that important info about freeing up the shifter, but can’t find anything. Although the need to use it is likely to be infrequent, it is critical when needed. It would be a good thing to let customers know about when orienting.
Thanks.

P.S. After reading Honda’s website info on Roadside Assistance, I also sent them the following email: "Roadside Assistance Fail (2018 CRV): Returned to airport parking from 3 wk vacation, battery dead. Cold, rainy night, 3 AM in the morning. Wife sick, with luggage in all-but-deserted terminal. Called Roadside Assistance. After gathering all information, was told mechanic would be there...in less than 3 hours!!! Really?! Choices were to either wait in freezing car and deserted airport until mechanic chose to show up, or take cab to motel, still not knowing when mechanic would show up. Roadside Assistance useless! Fortunately, found sympathetic airport employee to give me a jump, who then told me that the local mechanic contracted by Honda has a "reputation for undependability". Will be posting with owner's group and Della Honda in Plattsburgh, NY."
 

·
Registered
2016 CRV Touring AWD
Joined
·
3,780 Posts
The car was parked in such a way that the cables couldn’t reach, and needed to be pushed a few feet back, but of course the transmission was locked. Again, fortunately the young employee knew about a 'slot next to the gear shift' - covered by a very small piece of black plastic - that could free it up so I could shift into neutral. It was a critical piece of knowledge for which I was totally ignorant. We were ultimately able to shift into neutral, push the car, and jump-start it successfully. I have since looked just about everywhere (manual and online) for consumer info on that important info about freeing up the shifter, but can’t find anything. Although the need to use it is likely to be infrequent, it is critical when needed. It would be a good thing to let customers know about when orienting.
Thanks.

"
Page 632 of the owners manual (available on line and free by mail to new owners) shows you how to release the shifter.

http://techinfo.honda.com/rjanisis/pubs/OM/AH/ATLA1818OM/enu/ATLA1818OM.PDF
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
516 Posts
To give you an idea how Roadside Assistance should work, a few months ago, we had to have our motorhome towed at night. I contacted State Farm Roadside Assistance. The young lady (they all seem young to me these days!) saw my phone number pop up on her screen, and the first thing she asked was if we were OK, and out of immediate danger. Then she asked me which vehicle I was needing a towed. I told her it was the motorhome and she said "oh, I see we will need to get you a heavy duty truck with a extended reach boom, this might take a few minutes to arrange. I'll call you right back, or you can stay on the line". 15 minutes went by and she called back. "The nearest available truck was on another job, and as soon as they are finished they will head your way". "Estimated wait time 45 minutes". "Are you sure you are in a safe location?" "If not we can notify the police to check up on you". 30 minutes later the huge truck showed up with a extremely competent operator, he had the driveshaft disconnected, mirrors swung back and out of the way, motorhome hooked up to his wrecker and off he went towing us 52 miles to the nearest Allison transmission repair facility. The State Farm young woman called us back and mentioned she knew we were currently being towed, and wanted to know if everything was satisfactory with the process so far.

We arrived, the operator unhooked us, told us about some nearby all night restaurants, gave us the phone number for the police, and refused any tip I tried to give him. The next morning State Farm called again and asked if we were OK, and if we needed anything else they could help us with. My total cost was $0. Cost for the roadside assistance is less than $2 per month.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top