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Did you break in your engine? (Low rpm, no highway, for first 1000km)

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Discussion Starter #1
I have been "breaking in" my new 2019. And I know lots of people say it's not needed but I figure it can't hurt to do it anyways.

By break in I mean keeping the rpms under 3000, and zero highway driving, and going easy on acceleration. All for the first 1000 km. I'm at about 800 km now and can't wait till I'm all done! Please let me know in the poll!
 

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I don't think you need to avoid highway driving. Highway driving is actually quite relaxing for an engine, which is why the fuel economy is better. There used to be a concern about not keeping the RPM's at a steady drone for a long while, but that's actually not a concern with a CVT as the RPM's routinely fluctuate to keep the car going at a constant speed to account for terrain.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I don't think you need to avoid highway driving. Highway driving is actually quite relaxing for an engine, which is why the fuel economy is better. There used to be a concern about not keeping the RPM's at a steady drone for a long while, but that's actually not a concern with a CVT as the RPM's routinely fluctuate to keep the car going at a constant speed to account for terrain.
Yeah I was concerned with the droning rpm. I get the CVT would fluctuate more but I still think if you're on a flat road it would still be pretty steady rpm no?
Either way. Hard to say what totally works. Wasn't too hard for me to stay off the highway so not too bad.

Interesting to see other people broke in, I was assuming I was being overly cautious.
 

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there is language in the owners manual on how to break in. It's not a heavy lift. this is what I followed also.
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Help assure your vehicle’s future reliability and performance by paying extra attention to how you drive during the first 600 miles (1,000 km).

During this period:

Avoid full-throttle starts and rapid acceleration.
Do not change the oil until the scheduled maintenance time.
Avoid hard braking for the first 200 miles (300 km).
Do not tow a trailer.

You should also follow these recommendations with an overhauled or exchanged engine, or when the brakes are replaced.
 

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My wife's CR-V just crossed the 600 mile mark. Yes, we did baby the motor, however we did do some highway driving, probably 125 miles or so. We did keep the speed down to 65 MPH, so the RPMs stayed between 1800 and 2500. Figure in the near future, I'll see how much moxie the little motor has. Then go back to driving my little gas guzzling truck.
 

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My break-in procedure was to keep it below 10 psi boost for the 1st 500 miles.
 

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ScanGauge II.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
ScanGauge II.
Would love to talk more about that!
I have a OBD2 reader I've bought called bluedriver

As far as I can tell the only "boost" information I can find is the intake manifold absolute pressure.

Is this the measurement you were reading? I think with a calculation im able to get boost psi from that number.

Do you know anything about that?
 

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The ScanGauge displays vacuum and/or boost. Negative numbers are different levels of vacuum while positive numbers indicate different levels of boost. While driving, numbers change constantly/rapidly.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Would love to talk more about that!
I have a OBD2 reader I've bought called bluedriver

As far as I can tell the only "boost" information I can find is the intake manifold absolute pressure.

Is this the measurement you were reading? I think with a calculation im able to get boost psi from that number.

Do you know anything about that?
The ScanGauge displays vacuum and/or boost. Negative numbers are different levels of vacuum while positive numbers indicate different levels of boost. While driving, numbers change constantly/rapidly.
So do you know if your reading the same sensor I am?

If you are, I'm pretty sure you need to minus atmosphere pressure to your indicated reading.
 

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The ScanGauge is displaying info it receives from the ECU. Have you seen an analog vacuum/boost gauge? On those, as vacuum (negative numbers) decrease, the needle approaches zero. When boost starts, the needle moves to the other side of zero (positive numbers). The ScanGauge digitally displays negative numbers (vacuum) then switches to positive numbers (boost). Again, the ScanGauge displays info provided to it by the ECU via the OBD-II/ALDL port under the dash.
 

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I just drove mine normally. I rarely, if ever use full throttle. And I don't have a trailer. Braking? If i need to brake hard I will, or maybe the car will do it for me?
 

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I checked the Owners Manual for a 2001 CR-V, 2006 CR-V, and 2014 CR-V.

The 2001 and 2006 manuals say same thing:

For the first 600 miles (1,000 km) avoid full-throttle starts and rapid acceleration.
Avoid hard braking for the first 200 miles (300 km).
Do not change the oil until the scheduled maintenance time.

The 2006 also says to not tow a trailer in the first 600 miles (1,000 km).

The only thing I found in the 2014 Owners Manual was:

Avoid towing a trailer during your vehicle's first 600 miles (1,000 km).
 

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Including company cars, I have "broken in" 16. Being most were company cars, I have tried everything from petting them to running them hard. The only thing I did the same was being careful with the brakes for the first few hundred miles. It didn't seem to make any difference and I followed several to the end of their useful life (co-workers always want to buy my cars at the end of the lease). The last several I got, I just got into them and used them like I always do with no consideration of them being new. Back in the "good old days" of the 70s and 80s, the performance (power and fuel mileage) improved far more as they were broken in than they do now.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
One of my main concernes for breaking in the engine properly is that it makes sense to me that it the piston rings don't seat properly, as they wouldn't with a bad break in, then that could lead to oil dilution in the future.
 

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If the rings don't "seat", oil will enter the combustion chamber (constant blueish/white exhaust smoke). Some fuel into oil "dilution" occurs in every ICE ever made.
 

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Always do break that ride like you stole it, they want you to break your wallet not the car.
 
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