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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone. I guess I'm the new guy around here at the moment, but I thought I would share some DIY knowledge. (Not a bad way to start off my first post.)
Well, I just got my 1 Gen V about 3 weeks ago, and it kind of left me somewhat broke at the moment. But it doesn't mean I can't make it look a little better than before.

I don't have my camera at the moment, so I borrowed the pictures from H23 Lude from cb7tuners.com.
So credit for the pictures go to him. But I too have performed the procedure and some.

***Warning: I am not responsible for any damages or injuries done or made during these procedures. Since it is your vehicle, you attempt these at your own risk.***

Items You Need:
-Your choice of paint & color. (Use Hi-Temp if possible but not necessary.)
-Primer. (If you are using regular auto paint, I suggest using a Hi-Temp primer at least.)
-Clear Coat. (Optional.)
-Sand Paper. (400 and 2000 grit.)
-Polish.
-Wax.
-Cloths.
-Paint Stripper. (I found Aircraft paint stripper works best.)
-Rubbing Alcohol.
-A nice ventilated area.

Step 1:
Spray the valve cover with the paint stripper. Let it sit for about 20 minutes or so.


After letting it sit for a while, hose off all the stripper and all the paint should come off. If paint still resides in some areas, repeat Step 1.

Step 2:
Sand the valve cover down with the 400 grit sand paper. Make sure everything is smooth or until you are satisfied. Clean off

***Optional-Before sanding down the valve cover, you may also choose to shave it down smooth.***

Step 3:
Tape off any areas you don't want to paint.

Step 4:
Spray the primer on. 2-3 coats should suffice. Spray the primer on evenly with light coats. If you don't cover every thing on the first shot, don't panic. Just keep applying coats until you are satisfied. Also, try to avoid making any runs. It'll prevent you from sanding it down smooth again.
Wait at least 10 minutes between each coat.

Step 5:
Applying the paint. 3-4 coats should be suffice. Same directions as Step 4.
Wait at least 15 minutes between each coat.

Step 6:
Apply the clear coat. Same directions as Step 4.

Step 7:
Wait until the next day to sand it down with the 2000 grit sand paper, wax and polish.
Your results should look like this.

Before:

After:



Enjoy your new valve cover.

***Notes***
If you are going to be using a metallic paint such as DupliColor Metal Cast series. I suggest that you spray on a few layers of ground coating before the actual paint. I found that it enhances the metallic glare way more.

I also applied the same procedure to my battery tie-down and thermostat housing. I personally think it looks way better. Right now I'm even considering of painting my intake manifold and intake pipe when I actually get one.

Another thing you can do is right before you lay the clear coat down, you can apply a decal sticker to the valve cover.
 

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Very nice. I belive you have given a lot of input for just one post. Couldn't you also sand off the lettering after painting to turn the "HONDA" "DOHC" "SOHC" any of those things back to a metal color? That would be interesting.



 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Very nice. I belive you have given a lot of input for just one post. Couldn't you also sand off the lettering after painting to turn the "HONDA" "DOHC" "SOHC" any of those things back to a metal color? That would be interesting.
Yes, you can sand the lifted letters back to the metal. If you are patient enough and go for the extra mile, you can sand it to the bare metal and use extremely high grit sand paper to polish the letters up to get the polished aluminum look. But if you keep going, the letters would pretty much look chromed out.

As for the diamond plate pattern, be sure you have a steady hand. And practice your air brushing on an old hood or something. Getting to the fine detail can be a bit tricky.

These are not mine or my work.



 

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It's been a long time since I airbrushed anything, but I was getting pretty good at fake metals - aluminum tears, bricking, shading, underlaying. The diamond plate cover looks cool, but not covering the whole thing - it just looks odd. I'd go for an airplane rivet style



Like that. But that's always been my favorite, and I'd finish it up with something like this:


Or the infamous "the Dragon and his tail" great joke, can't post the airplane graphic on this forum but you can search it.



 

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I would sugest baking it after the clear coat. this way, you make sure that all the layers of primer, paint and clear are bonded together.

JM2C
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
good point about baking!



its the SOHC a D16-d16y7?
Yes, baking will work too. Most people I know just don't bother because once it on the engine, the heat from the engine bay tends to cure the clear coat a bit.

Actually, those are F22A1 or F22A6 covers.

Another idea just occurred to me while watching my dad fix shoes. So, he's the one who inspired me on this:
If you want the lifted letters to be a different color, paint the cover to what color you want the letters to be. Let it dry for roughly about 30-60 minutes.
Next, put one layer of masking tape over the letters. Make sure it extends about 1-1.5 inches past the letters..
Take some 400 grit sand paper and just gently go over the edges.
Once completed, the tape should be perforated and you will be able to take the access tape off with ease but covering the top surface of the letters.
Continue to paint as normal.
Before you spray the clear coat on, remove all the tape.
Then you should have a 2 tone valve cover.
Once to
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
It's been a long time since I airbrushed anything, but I was getting pretty good at fake metals - aluminum tears, bricking, shading, underlaying. The diamond plate cover looks cool, but not covering the whole thing - it just looks odd. I'd go for an airplane rivet style



I think that looks really good.
I need to go by more tips for my brush.
I was thinking of painting a welding helmet that looks like IronMan.
 
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