Honda CR-V Owners Club Forums banner
41 - 60 of 106 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
I filled up with 89 octane last week as the 87 handle was broken at the gas station I was at. I noticed no difference in the running of the engine or gas mileage.
Additionally, I drive 28 miles round trip to and from work 5 days a week using city streets, no freeway driving. My car has shown 30.2 miles per gallon everyday. I stay within the speed limits but I don’t drive like a snail. Mine is a 2018 Touring.
 

·
Banned
2014 CRV EX-L AWD
Joined
·
8 Posts
Im going on a 500mile road trip and was wondering if running mid range 89 would maybe give the car better milage, performance and maybe help de-gunk the engine. anyone here run 89 or above on their CRVs?
I always use COSTCO gas 91 octane premium gasoline. Daily commute and long trip. Because I don't like gasoline with ethanol content. Bad for your engine.
 

·
Registered
2015 CR-V EX-L
Joined
·
6 Posts
You could research what the actual difference is between different octane levels. Unfortunately, many people think higher octane = more power, but that's just not true. What nearly everyone has said about just buying what Honda recommends is correct. They say 87 "or higher" only because higher octane will not damage your engine, but scientifically speaking, so long as you're not experiencing pre-detonation (aka knocking - and note that sometimes you can have pre-detonation and not hear knocking) you will get better performance out of LOWER octane fuel.
 

·
Registered
2016 CRV EX-L AWD
Joined
·
509 Posts
I'll put my 2 cents here. I've tried a few times using 91 vs 87 in our 2008 CRV, 2013 venza, and 2016 CRV. While using 91, I did not see any mpg increase or notice any power difference with my butt dyno. Pretty sure the CRV is not tuned to increase power with higher octane fuel.
However my buddys Forester turbo requires premium gas and it does detune to lower power when using regular gas. There is a noticeable power decrease when we tried it. So it depends on the car if it was designed to require premium or not.
 

·
Registered
2020 Touring Hybrid
Joined
·
867 Posts
Gas is gas. I’ve been using the cheapest lowest octane for over 40 yrs. my Audi 5000tq used it too. I’ve tried the lowest octane on several 1000 mile trips and never saw a dif. In mileage. So slow down and you’d see the best mileage at 60-65. And keep filters clean too. Any water in your tank probably would have come from condensation from an empty tank. Varnish and gunk on valves probably would have come from fumes that contain oil vapor and dust that escaped thru the filters. Only carb cleaner can cut that. Proof? Never saw any done by an independent source.
There’s plenty of research on the benefits of top tier gas. Have a look. But you can run water in your tank if you want, I don’t care.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Im going on a 500mile road trip and was wondering if running mid range 89 would maybe give the car better milage, performance and maybe help de-gunk the engine. anyone here run 89 or above on their CRVs?
I always use 89 or 91… and just drove about 2800 round trip. My little girl (Blanche- not AWD) averaged over 35 mpg. So thrilled with my CRV. only problem, my sunroof leaks…..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I would disagree. I will explain my part why.
When one pulls up at a modern gas station in north America, how does one determine if the fuel is degraded..? There is no way to tell. Even when pulling up at Joes Country Store and Gas. The gas is bought wholesale and the margin made is miniscule if any. The money is made from the convenience store. But for that to happen people need to be filling up. So the fuel must have a decent turnaround. Independents are really hard to run long term. Thats why most people go franchise now. The model is easier.

Not only that the gas station has to be strategically located now. For example on a long trip people fill up on the edge of the city as they leave(human nature) and again at the 1.5 or 3 hour mark. This is determined by coffee and pee break. The absolute is the three hour mark for gas. Around those areas places like McDonalds, restaurants, coffee houses spring up. Many old gas stations in between those areas don't exist anymore. Or they have gone bust in the last 30 years as driving habits and car reliability have improved. Anything outside of that (depending on what places are in between) people are not going to stop to fill up.

So a gas station needs a specific volume of traffic to be economically viable. Also modern cars don't break down as much, they have better fuel filters, more refined engine and ECU's that compensate if things are going pear shaped.
So statistically speaking speaking, the likelihood of filling up stale petroleum at Joes gas station(or of them existing) is extremely low. Even if one did. It would not impact the engine as much.
This s a CRV not a high performance Ferrari. Use 87 gas and don’t let it sit in your tank for weeks because the ethanol in all gas is what causes problems. Run any additive with PEA every 5-10k miles and that will keep your fuel system clean. Use synthetic oil. It’s very cheap on Amazon or at Walmart. Change the oil every 6-7k, drain and fill the transmission fluid every time you change the oil (only use Honda Trans fluid) and you can run to 200k mikes easily. Follow the manual for the other maintenance (coolant, brake fluid, timing belt, spark plugs etc) as well. I own a 2013 Acura RDX, a 2015 CRV and a 2008 Honda Civic. Except for the timing belt, I do all the maintenance myself. None of my cars have ever had an issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
I always use 89 or 91… and just drove about 2800 round trip. My little girl (Blanche- not AWD) averaged over 35 mpg. So thrilled with my CRV. only problem, my sunroof leaks…..
Check your drain holes , there are one on the left and on on the right .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Stay with major brand gasoline. All basic gasoline molecules are the same, it is only the additives that are different. Techron is supposed to be one of the best, though I would also trust XOM and Shell, maybe BP. Never get plain "rack gasoline" like at grocery stores, Sam's Club, COSTCO et al. These gasolines have a minimum of additives and also may not check their tanks for water frequently. I worked in chemicals and refining and this is what I follow. Unless your manufacturer calls for higher octane gasoline, do not purchase it, though they do carry higher levels of additive. Premium and regular are delivered to the stations and mid-range is just a 50/50 blend of the two.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Im going on a 500mile road trip and was wondering if running mid range 89 would maybe give the car better milage, performance and maybe help de-gunk the engine. anyone here run 89 or above on their CRVs?
I just took a road Trip over 2,000 miles on regular gas and got an average of 33.9 mpg. My car is a CRV 2020 Turbo charged
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Im going on a 500mile road trip and was wondering if running mid range 89 would maybe give the car better milage, performance and maybe help de-gunk the engine. anyone here run 89 or above on their CRVs?
Im going on a 500mile road trip and was wondering if running mid range 89 would maybe give the car better milage, performance and maybe help de-gunk the engine. anyone here run 89 or above on their CRVs?
Cheap is always good with me haha and I agree about changing the oil religiously with stop and go driving
Im going on a 500mile road trip and was wondering if running mid range 89 would maybe give the car better milage, performance and maybe help de-gunk the engine. anyone here run 89 or above on their CRVs?
Im going on a 500mile road trip and was wondering if running mid range 89 would maybe give the car better milage, performance and maybe help de-gunk the engine. anyone here run 89 or above on their CRVs?
often wonder how a car equipped with a turbocharger running 10.3 can run on 87 octane .
 

·
Registered
2020 CR-V EX-L
Joined
·
29 Posts
All true, except it ignores Honda recommendation to only use top tier fuel. Top Tier Fuel.

Stick with Honda recommendations, or at least please stop trying to convince other owners that any low cost cheap gas they can find will work fine. Given the high pressure fuel systems in modern DI engines... it seems imprudent not to use top tier fuel. Doubly so in gen5 CRVs that have reported some issues with fuel injectors at about the 75K mark.

And no.. it is not difficult to determine if a fuel is top tier or not. It's published all over the internet, by brand, by state, etc.
My 2020 manual states “use top tier fuel when available”. Problem is, in some parts of the country ( my area in rural central PA ) top tier gad is very sparse or non existant. Most convenient and grocery store pumps aren’t top tier. Major brand name stations are few and far between and would require a long drive out of your way just to fill up with top tier fuel. That’s not very economical.
So often times we’re forced to fill up with non top tier gas.
 

·
Registered
20' CRV EX-L 2 wd
Joined
·
36 Posts
My 2020 manual states “use top tier fuel when available”. Problem is, in some parts of the country ( my area in rural central PA ) top tier gad is very sparse or non existant. Most convenient and grocery store pumps aren’t top tier. Major brand name stations are few and far between and would require a long drive out of your way just to fill up with top tier fuel. That’s not very economical.
So often times we’re forced to fill up with non top tier gas.
if no top tier availble then maybe a Chevron Techron, is ok IMHO
 

·
Super Moderator
2007 Accord EX 2020 CR-V Hybrid EX
Joined
·
3,796 Posts
My 2020 manual states “use top tier fuel when available”. Problem is, in some parts of the country ( my area in rural central PA ) top tier gad is very sparse or non existant. Most convenient and grocery store pumps aren’t top tier. Major brand name stations are few and far between and would require a long drive out of your way just to fill up with top tier fuel. That’s not very economical.
So often times we’re forced to fill up with non top tier gas.
I have the same issue when in the boonies, but I figure a tank or two of non-TT once in a while isn't going to hurt.
I suspect a lot of gas that's not branded TT actually does meet those standards. Refineries aren't making special runs for grocery stores.
(I know it's the additives, but the same argument might apply)
I wonder if Blackstone or another outfit that does oil analysis could analyze a fuel sample and tell you what's in it.
Probably not, shipping gasoline around by UPS or FedEX probably isn't a good idea.
 

·
Registered
2019 Honda CR-V
Joined
·
1 Posts
Im going on a 500mile road trip and was wondering if running mid range 89 would maybe give the car better milage, performance and maybe help de-gunk the engine. anyone here run 89 or above on their CRVs?
I seriously thought you were talking about MPH.....clearly missed the part about "octane!" LOL
 

·
Super Moderator
2017 CRV Touring - Pearl White w Black Interior
Joined
·
7,081 Posts
I have the same issue when in the boonies, but I figure a tank or two of non-TT once in a while isn't going to hurt.
I suspect a lot of gas that's not branded TT actually does meet those standards. Refineries aren't making special runs for grocery stores.
(I know it's the additives, but the same argument might apply)
I wonder if Blackstone or another outfit that does oil analysis could analyze a fuel sample and tell you what's in it.
Probably not, shipping gasoline around by UPS or FedEX probably isn't a good idea.
It is true that often times fuel pumped into tanks at "discount fuel stations" or "off brands" may in fact come from a local supply from one of the major producers who do in fact ship tip tier fuel in distribution, there is generally no way to tell as a consumer this is happening. Oil companies do share distribution and delivery credits with each other, particularly to help better cover small distribution markets, but that alone does not mean they always dispense top tier fuel.

I imagine that central fuel depots that dispense fuel would also have the ability add the detergent additives required for top tier certification into the fuel as it is dispensed into trucks for delivery, but there is no guarantee of this. But it would make business sense, since each major brand uses a slightly different detergent recipe and they do share depot dispensing in many parts of the country.

My 2020 manual states “use top tier fuel when available”. Problem is, in some parts of the country ( my area in rural central PA ) top tier gad is very sparse or non existant. Most convenient and grocery store pumps aren’t top tier. Major brand name stations are few and far between and would require a long drive out of your way just to fill up with top tier fuel. That’s not very economical.
So often times we’re forced to fill up with non top tier gas.
There are over 50 brands of fuel sold in the US that meet top tier certifications, and they are by no means all big brand names. And your odd brand local fuel stations are not likely being supplied by some small fly by night supplier.

Just check for this logo on the pumps:
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/f/fa/Top_Tier_Gas_Logo.png or look up your local station brand here.

OR.. if you have patience and time, ask the station who they get their fuel from and generally when, and then observe whose fuel truck shows up and drops fuel into the tanks.
 

·
Super Moderator
2017 CRV Touring - Pearl White w Black Interior
Joined
·
7,081 Posts
25 years ago, there were no fuel detergent additives for general fuel use by consumers. That changed beginning in 1996. Car enthusiasts also generally added fuel cleaner and treatment to their fuel tank every month or two to help keep engine deposits down.

While Wikipedia can be hit or miss on accuracy and objectivity sometimes, their current article covering Top Tier Fuel actually appears to be sourced and vetted properly for objectivity and accuracy. So.. if you want to understand the history, lineage, and business drivers for why top tier fuel exists and is driven by major motor vehicle producers influence over fuel supplies and regulations.. it is worth the time to read. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Top_Tier_Detergent_Gasoline

Don't trust or like Wikipedia? Try this then instead, particularly the handful of you that claim detergents are not needed in your fuel and add no value, something Honda would however disagree with such assertions that any old fuel is fine. And note that AAA's analysis on the matter has concluded that use of non Top Tier Fuel could in fact cost you as much as 4% extra in fuel costs just due to poor fuel economy in modern engines that do not use Top Tier Fuel.

Groups like AAA have since conducted studies on Top Tier gasoline in comparison to gasolines with only the lowest additive concentration, looking to see if it really does make a difference. The results of their studies, running both kinds of gasolines through standardized driving patterns and then measuring any deposits formed, show that Top Tier gasolines reduce the formation of engine deposits by 19 times.

That’s a huge difference, one that leads AAA to conclude that using gasoline that is non-top tier can actually cost you money by reducing your fuel economy by up to 4%. So it’s pretty clear that detergent levels in gasoline do make a measurable and meaningful difference. Yet only 12% of drivers choose gasoline because of what they know about the detergents in the gasoline. This must mean that the majority of drivers don’t really know what the difference is.
Note that it was not the fuel companies that drove this move in the market, it was the big major motor vehicle producers.
 
41 - 60 of 106 Posts
Top