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Discussion Starter #1
Poster URMdyldo (something like that) posted in another thread about how warming up your car could do damages to your water cool turbo. Since I'm one of those warm-upers, I asked him to clarify out of concern since I've never heard of such thing before. It has been some days now and he has been AWOL with no response so I would like to ask this forum if anyone has heard of such things. If so I have to stop the practice of warming up my CRV. Sheeeesh, why must there be yet another issue.
 

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My $0.02........I don't think the turbo is water cooled, oil cooled/lubricated yes. I believe the exhaust ports in the head are water cooled, to cool exhaust temps somewhat.

Since the turbo is driven by exhaust gas, I would think the turbo heats up really quick. It is a good thing to allow enough time after start-up to allow engine oil to be circulated all the way to the top of the motor, which would include the turbo, before driving off.

From a cold start, I wait until the engine rpms drop to 1200-1300, then start to drive easy until engine heat starts to rise. I would think it takes less than 1 minute for oil to be circulated to the top of the motor form a cold start. Driving will warm up the motor quicker than idling.

Again, my $0.02.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I would like to know if there are any harms to the turbo if we idle the car to warm it up.
 

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Idle is a lot better then turning it off and no power...
 

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I would like to know if there are any harms to the turbo if we idle the car to warm it up.
It’s the oil you want to warm up as quickly as possible......driving will warm up everything quicker than idling.
 

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At idle the turbo is barely in operation. But agree with others that idling to warm up is a waste of time and fuel.
 

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dont need to warm up to running temp but a couple minutes to get oil to starting moving and warming up in really cold temps (well below freezing) is best for longevity.

After a couple minutes, drive gently until the temp guage is well on it's way up towards running temp though.

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warming up in really cold temps (well below freezing) is best for longevity.Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
This is old school petroleum era thinking- 0-20W synthetics provides great lubrication right off the bat at extremely cold temps. Sure 10- 20 seconds is one thing but idling for 2 minutes is a waste.
 

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Not old school. I'm an engine tech, have been for going on 20 yrs. There is a reason why my CRV has 224k miles, my odyssey has 136k, both engines and transmissions function like new. Because of how I treat them. Once it gets cold, they run 1-2 minutes before driving off for the first time during the day.

2007 Chevy Cobalt, sold it with 136k, has almost 180k on it (see the woman about once a week at gas station) and she cant believe how perfect the car has been mechanically. Nothing but routine maintainance the entire time.

0w20 is actually not a good idea for engines except in wintertime and not high from engines.

0w20 is only used because of how light it is to help with EPA fuel economy ratings.

Truth be told, that belief pattern is something all us mechanics LOVE. Engine and transmission failures much sooner than they should. Job security.

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Discussion Starter #11
I'm with Tigris. Besides oil flowing to all parts of the engine, you also have external non-oil lubbed moving parts to think about. So a warm-up is better than not.

So back to the question of the thread, it seems to me that A WARM-UP DOES NOT HARM YOUR TURBO, RIGHT?

If so I can't believe the amount of misinformation spread on the internet.
 

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If anyone said letting a car with a turbo warm up (for a couple minutes) hurts a turbo, they are way wrong.

Now constant PROLONGED Idling (letting it sit and warm up for 15 minutes every day) can and will due to carbon build up. Will start causing reductions in oil flow.

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A turbo fan will Need to be cooled down more then a warm up. why you change your oil more often then less.
 

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Not old school. I'm an engine tech, have been for going on 20 yrs. There is a reason why my CRV has 224k miles, my odyssey has 136k, both engines and transmissions function like new. Because of how I treat them. Once it gets cold, they run 1-2 minutes before driving off for the first time during the day.

2007 Chevy Cobalt, sold it with 136k, has almost 180k on it (see the woman about once a week at gas station) and she cant believe how perfect the car has been mechanically. Nothing but routine maintainance the entire time.

0w20 is actually not a good idea for engines except in wintertime and not high from engines.

0w20 is only used because of how light it is to help with EPA fuel economy ratings.

Truth be told, that belief pattern is something all us mechanics LOVE. Engine and transmission failures much sooner than they should. Job security.

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So you always let your vehicle warm up and it has 224k miles?

If you have never driven your cars any other way, how do you know it wouldn't have lasted the same number of miles by just getting in the car and driving it easily for the first few miles?

Answer: you don't....

My last vehicle had 145k on it and I never let it sit and warm up. Always started it and took off easily. Ran like new when I sold it and never a problem.

I'm wondering how you arrived at the "0w20 is actually not a good idea for an engine" comment?

Because the automotive engineers who designed the engine seem to think it is.

Have you done more engine design and testing than Honda or GM?

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2018 EX here. I May be a bit off topic, but I work evenings and when I'm leaving my job, I will remote start my vehicle for a few minutes for the time it takes to get to the parking garage. I do smell a "Rich exhaust smell" but it doesn't smell of gas. Just started smelling this exhaust smell maybe since the weather had gotten colder (low 30s and below) within the last few weeks here in DC METRO area.
I've already had my first oil change back September.

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So you always let your vehicle warm up and it has 224k miles?

If you have never driven your cars any other way, how do you know it wouldn't have lasted the same number of miles by just getting in the car and driving it easily for the first few miles?

Answer: you don't....

My last vehicle had 145k on it and I never let it sit and warm up. Always started it and took off easily. Ran like new when I sold it and never a problem.

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except you missed the ENTIRE rest of my post. It's funny when people get defensive over my posts when I DO KNOW. Its MY JOB TO KNOW.

And you live where, Florida and have a heated garage?

Engines and transmissions is what I do for a living. Been doing it since I could see over a hood and professionally for almost 20 yrs

Ever since I have owned a vehicle I have never had an engine failure, sludge build up, etc. But I see mainly timing system failures regularly during the winter. Chains stretch and tensioner fails.

The old way of letting an engine fully warm up (10-15 so on minutes) is a waste and can cause issues with modern engines due to excessive idle time.

But when you have 1 vehicle to use as an arguement against those who are in the profession, especially when my examples are just my current vehicles. More than happy to start listing off all that I can remember that the issues were cold related.

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So when I go to work and I sit for 5 hours Sometimes and yes in the extreme temps we live in Winter and Summer. nuff said Lol

No wait let me add in 30 years of Idling yes indeed .
 

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A lot of motor oil facts in this read.

http://www.positivespin.us/MotorOil.htm

From a cold start, letting the motor idle 1-2 minutes may be a good idea in extremely cold weather.......it may take 1-2 minutes for the motor to idle down to 1200-1300rpm in extremely cold weather. I just use the 1200-1300rpm benchmark vs time (before driving off) because I'm reasonably sure oil has reached the top of the motor by the time rpms have dropped to 1200-1300. The colder the oil, the slower it's flow. Flow equals lubrication.

Maybe some folks will change their thinking/understanding of motor oil, viscosity, flow and lubrication after reading the article.......maybe not.

A heated garage in Florida........really? ROTF,LMAO......that's a good one.:rofl:

Looks like another thread may be heading south toward nasty land.
 

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Dang I was out for the weekend and come back to this and a note from admins.

I actually meant that it's a good thing to put a light load on these turbos early in the morning to get the oil and water temp up quicker. I am not talking full or even moderate boost, just light loads. Getting the turbo up to operating temperature is definitely better for it. It's better for turbo seals and lubrication of the turbo itself.

I also said in that thread that once the Cat warm up mode is over, these cars are ready to be driven. Cat warm up brings the cat, turbo and engine up to an operating temperature that is nominal for driving. Cat warm up mode is very audible and noticeable by the RPM drop when the vehicle is warm enough.

But again, do as you want. Let your CRV sit cold in the driveway for 10-15 min and keep that turbo as cold as possible.

EDIT: I am also a man of reason. If one of the old whipper snappers wants to show me the oil and coolant temps at 10 min of idling verse 10 min of driving I would love to know the difference. I thought the whole BIT$H fest of this forum was that there was a heating issue and that is not good for a turbo that likes to be at a stable operating temperature. Not to mention adding in possible oil dilution at idle. I really can't see any positives of idling these cars for long periods of time.
 

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A lot of motor oil facts in this read.

http://www.positivespin.us/MotorOil.htm

From a cold start, letting the motor idle 1-2 minutes may be a good idea in extremely cold weather.......it may take 1-2 minutes for the motor to idle down to 1200-1300rpm in extremely cold weather. I just use the 1200-1300rpm benchmark vs time (before driving off) because I'm reasonably sure oil has reached the top of the motor by the time rpms have dropped to 1200-1300. The colder the oil, the slower it's flow. Flow equals lubrication.

Maybe some folks will change their thinking/understanding of motor oil, viscosity, flow and lubrication after reading the article.......maybe not.

A heated garage in Florida........really? ROTF,LMAO......that's a good one.:rofl:

Looks like another thread may be heading south toward nasty land.
the heated garage in Florida was just a joke. How did you not catch the sarcasm with "heated garage" and "florida" in the same sentance lol.

A lot of ppl say it's a waste but the coldest they ever see is barely in the 20s, so ya really no point. When you deal with real cold you learn real fast you dont jump in and go.

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