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I am new to the forum, I did a search on the crv winter driving characteristics because I own one and my wife and I are experiencing unstable driving in the CRV. We own a 2018 LX AWD, we owned a 2016 Ford Escape and our when our lease expired we upgraded to the 2018 CRV because of it's larger interior and fuel economy. We like the extra room and the fuel economy has been as advertised.

So, now that I have that out of the way, I live in Atlantic Canada and I have been driving for 30 years as has my wife, we are very experienced winter drivers, always use snow tires(Bridgestone ice radials were included in our purchase at the recommendation of our Honda dealer) and are certainly on the conservative scale when it comes to how we approach winter driving.

We are having a difficult time with our CRV and it's lack of traction in snow and on moderately icy roads, the vehicles AWD system is unlike anything I have ever experienced, it seems to be working against itself for lack of a better expression lol. We have both experienced situations where the vehicle wants to shoot to the left or right on snow and is treacherous in any type of turning situation on snow or ice, we find ourselves having to be over cautious as a means of trying to commute in the safest manner possible in this vehicle. We are in a 3 year lease and are stuck with it, The Ford Escape was a tank on snow and ice and moving to the CRV has been an adjustment, to say the least. I am not a troll or a bot and I can provide my serial number if anyone believes that I just trolling. I am simply looking for answers and yes we are cold in this vehicle as well, thankful for the heated seats at least.
 

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Have you messed with tire pressure, make sure sensing is not engaged etc?

i’m in northeast us and its been pretty good in snow and ice, majority of the crv complaints are the oem tires.
i had them for a while and got us through a few noreasters.

in a turn if the rear will engage if slipping, most people will let off the gas which will stop the rear from spinning but have to feather it a bit.

also when you say its darting do you mean on a straight road it will leave the lane? Or wheel cuts?
 

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sounds like a bot to me. your serial # ? Who has a serial # ? and i have not seen anyone complaining about the heat in their CRV. gimme a break
 

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He is likely referring to what we call VIN in the USA and also in Canada ... numéro de série de la voiture!

And yes, we also drive cars above the Arctic Circle and changed out from interior cold CRV's to Honda Passports
 

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I am new to the forum, I did a search on the crv winter driving characteristics because I own one and my wife and I are experiencing unstable driving in the CRV. We own a 2018 LX AWD, we owned a 2016 Ford Escape and our when our lease expired we upgraded to the 2018 CRV because of it's larger interior and fuel economy. We like the extra room and the fuel economy has been as advertised.

So, now that I have that out of the way, I live in Atlantic Canada and I have been driving for 30 years as has my wife, we are very experienced winter drivers, always use snow tires(Bridgestone ice radials were included in our purchase at the recommendation of our Honda dealer) and are certainly on the conservative scale when it comes to how we approach winter driving.

We are having a difficult time with our CRV and it's lack of traction in snow and on moderately icy roads, the vehicles AWD system is unlike anything I have ever experienced, it seems to be working against itself for lack of a better expression lol. We have both experienced situations where the vehicle wants to shoot to the left or right on snow and is treacherous in any type of turning situation on snow or ice, we find ourselves having to be over cautious as a means of trying to commute in the safest manner possible in this vehicle. We are in a 3 year lease and are stuck with it, The Ford Escape was a tank on snow and ice and moving to the CRV has been an adjustment, to say the least. I am not a troll or a bot and I can provide my serial number if anyone believes that I just trolling. I am simply looking for answers and yes we are cold in this vehicle as well, thankful for the heated seats at least.
As mentioned above, tires are everything. But you might try turning off VSA when the AWD seems to be acting squirrely. Actually the VSA button doesn't completely disables VSA but tones it down. Depending on the model Escape you had, it may have had a selector switch you could adjust to tune the VSA for different road conditions. The CRV doesn't have that option.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Have you messed with tire pressure, make sure sensing is not engaged etc?

i’m in northeast us and its been pretty good in snow and ice, majority of the crv complaints are the oem tires.
i had them for a while and got us through a few noreasters.

in a turn if the rear will engage if slipping, most people will let off the gas which will stop the rear from spinning but have to feather it a bit.

also when you say its darting do you mean on a straight road it will leave the lane? Or wheel cuts?
I am running the tires at the recommended psi on the sticker inside the drivers door. I just find the vehicle light in the front end and it does not have the level of traction from the AWD system that I was expecting.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
sounds like a bot to me. your serial # ? Who has a serial # ? and i have not seen anyone complaining about the heat in their CRV. gimme a break
Where do you live? I live in atlantic Canada where the temperatures regularly dip below zero, I have an f150 that is always quick to warm up and yes I do realize that it is a small engine.
 

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Having grown up with rear wheel drive vehicles, I find the CRV very solid on the rare occasion we get "weather".
I suspect you may have an issue, a good 4 wheel alignment might help. These Vs are small, very weight biased to the front, should be stable on anything other than solid ice. Also, a bit of brake drag could cause issue.
 

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I'm going to agree with others that tires are everything when driving in snow and ice. The best AWD system cannot make up for lousy tires for snow and ice conditions. There are a number of ongoing threads discussing winter tires and handling of CRVs. Just because the Honda Dealer told you the tires are ice ready.. does not mean they are good ice and snow tires. It is an LX and a the base trim for CRVs... I would be surprised if the tires on the vehicle when you leased it are actually good tires.

You state that the vehicle came with "Bridgestone Ice Radials" but that is a generic description.. not a model specific description. Can you provide specifics on what the tires on the vehicle are exactly? ie: read the model of tire, sizing, etc... right off the side of the tire. https://www.tirerack.com/winter/brand.jsp?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI6M6KpYr15gIVB9bACh3aMAcREAAYAyAAEgKMKfD_BwE&brand=Bridgestone&ef_id=EAIaIQobChMI6M6KpYr15gIVB9bACh3aMAcREAAYAyAAEgKMKfD_BwE:G:s&s_kwcid=AL!3756!3!346718836700!p!!g!!bridgestone ice&gclsrc=aw.ds

If you are in doubt about the vehicle AWD operating properly... since it is a 2018... still under warranty.... take it to the dealer to evaluate the AWD handling.

All AWD systems work a bit differently across different brands. Keep in mind.. some of this could simply be you being used to the way your Ford drove in snow and ice, and that you are simply not yet adjusted to the CRV. Since it's a 2018.. I would think you have driven it enough to have adjusted by now though. The gen5 CRV AWD system is pretty dynamic in how it applies traction to the wheels.. and does apply traction to the rear wheels more than most owners think or believe (ie: not just for traction control). It is quite different than prior generation CRVs... which is where the confusion comes from I think.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I'm going to agree with others that tires are everything when driving in snow and ice. The best AWD system cannot make up for lousy tires for snow and ice conditions. There are a number of ongoing threads discussing winter tires and handling of CRVs. Just because the Honda Dealer told you the tires are ice ready.. does not mean they are good ice and snow tires. It is an LX and a the base trim for CRVs... I would be surprised if the tires on the vehicle when you leased it are actually good tires.

You state that the vehicle came with "Bridgestone Ice Radials" but that is a generic description.. not a model specific description. Can you provide specifics on what the tires on the vehicle are exactly? ie: read the model of tire, sizing, etc... right off the side of the tire. https://www.tirerack.com/winter/brand.jsp?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI6M6KpYr15gIVB9bACh3aMAcREAAYAyAAEgKMKfD_BwE&brand=Bridgestone&ef_id=EAIaIQobChMI6M6KpYr15gIVB9bACh3aMAcREAAYAyAAEgKMKfD_BwE:G:s&s_kwcid=AL!3756!3!346718836700!p!!g!!bridgestone ice&gclsrc=aw.ds

If you are in doubt about the vehicle AWD operating properly... since it is a 2018... still under warranty.... take it to the dealer to evaluate the AWD handling.

All AWD systems work a bit differently across different brands. Keep in mind.. some of this could simply be you being used to the way your Ford drove in snow and ice, and that you are simply not yet adjusted to the CRV. Since it's a 2018.. I would think you have driven it enough to have adjusted by now though. The gen5 CRV AWD system is pretty dynamic in how it applies traction to the wheels.. and does apply traction to the rear wheels more than most owners think or believe (ie: not just for traction control). It is quite different than prior generation CRVs... which is where the confusion comes from I think.
My bad, the tires are BF Goodrich winter T/A tires, they were the tires that the dealership was selling for the CRV. The vehicle definitely feels lighter at the front, less stable to us, I also own an F150 that is a beast on bad roads. I appreciate your response and when I am at the dealer I will bring this up with the service department. We just recieved another 30 cms(12 inches) of snow yesterday to go along with the 20 cms we got on Sunday, we really do live in an area that would test the ability of any AWD vehicle.
 

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I am new to the forum, I did a search on the crv winter driving characteristics because I own one and my wife and I are experiencing unstable driving in the CRV. We own a 2018 LX AWD, we owned a 2016 Ford Escape and our when our lease expired we upgraded to the 2018 CRV because of it's larger interior and fuel economy. We like the extra room and the fuel economy has been as advertised.

So, now that I have that out of the way, I live in Atlantic Canada and I have been driving for 30 years as has my wife, we are very experienced winter drivers, always use snow tires(Bridgestone ice radials were included in our purchase at the recommendation of our Honda dealer) and are certainly on the conservative scale when it comes to how we approach winter driving.

We are having a difficult time with our CRV and it's lack of traction in snow and on moderately icy roads, the vehicles AWD system is unlike anything I have ever experienced, it seems to be working against itself for lack of a better expression lol. We have both experienced situations where the vehicle wants to shoot to the left or right on snow and is treacherous in any type of turning situation on snow or ice, we find ourselves having to be over cautious as a means of trying to commute in the safest manner possible in this vehicle. We are in a 3 year lease and are stuck with it, The Ford Escape was a tank on snow and ice and moving to the CRV has been an adjustment, to say the least. I am not a troll or a bot and I can provide my serial number if anyone believes that I just trolling. I am simply looking for answers and yes we are cold in this vehicle as well, thankful for the heated seats at least.
[
I believe you. I, too, am not new to snow and ice driving. This picture shows what happened to me Thursday night. My 2017 EX-L AWD is now totaled. Radar obstructed warning, no traction control, and the feeling like the car took over. I landed in a ditch off the side of a hill, narrowly missing a head-on crash into an oak tree. I was found 30 minutes later. Terrifying. This picture was taken before the heavy duty tow. Mind you, I've driven our 2011 Pilot AWD, 2013 Ridgeline 4WD, and 2005 Subaru Forester successfully in much worse conditions. Now, I am left wondering why it happened: I made sure the dealer updated the software per Honda TSB 07-614 after I got the radar obstructed warning last year in snow. Was it the tires? The electronics? Would the radar obstruction shut down features that could cause this? Or is it just me? I am very sad and confused and am really doubting my own driving abilities now.
137265
 

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No AWD/4WD system applies traction......they apply torque. Traction, or not, is applied by the tires. Picky, picky.
 

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I am new to the forum, I did a search on the crv winter driving characteristics because I own one and my wife and I are experiencing unstable driving in the CRV. We own a 2018 LX AWD, we owned a 2016 Ford Escape and our when our lease expired we upgraded to the 2018 CRV because of it's larger interior and fuel economy. We like the extra room and the fuel economy has been as advertised.

So, now that I have that out of the way, I live in Atlantic Canada and I have been driving for 30 years as has my wife, we are very experienced winter drivers, always use snow tires(Bridgestone ice radials were included in our purchase at the recommendation of our Honda dealer) and are certainly on the conservative scale when it comes to how we approach winter driving.

We are having a difficult time with our CRV and it's lack of traction in snow and on moderately icy roads, the vehicles AWD system is unlike anything I have ever experienced, it seems to be working against itself for lack of a better expression lol. We have both experienced situations where the vehicle wants to shoot to the left or right on snow and is treacherous in any type of turning situation on snow or ice, we find ourselves having to be over cautious as a means of trying to commute in the safest manner possible in this vehicle. We are in a 3 year lease and are stuck with it, The Ford Escape was a tank on snow and ice and moving to the CRV has been an adjustment, to say the least. I am not a troll or a bot and I can provide my serial number if anyone believes that I just trolling. I am simply looking for answers and yes we are cold in this vehicle as well, thankful for the heated seats at least.
What tires are installed now? I have a 08 crv the tires that came with my car are bridgestone duelers worst tires in the world I'm from the boston mass area so are snow people here.i ended up getting 2 sets of tires general altimax rt43 which I love and winter time I have a set of blizzaks non studded love them.crvs from dealer new have bad choices in tires.i got 20 I out of duelers with warranty got all 4 new tires for free again and 20k out of second set free again with rotations and alignments all free.and 1000 of complaints about them and the continentals that come on them are horrible get a new set of tires with good ratings in an all season tires.pick a good tire and get s new set like I have general altimax rt43..
 

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[
I believe you. I, too, am not new to snow and ice driving. This picture shows what happened to me Thursday night. My 2017 EX-L AWD is now totaled. Radar obstructed warning, no traction control, and the feeling like the car took over. I landed in a ditch off the side of a hill, narrowly missing a head-on crash into an oak tree. I was found 30 minutes later. Terrifying. This picture was taken before the heavy duty tow. Mind you, I've driven our 2011 Pilot AWD, 2013 Ridgeline 4WD, and 2005 Subaru Forester successfully in much worse conditions. Now, I am left wondering why it happened: I made sure the dealer updated the software per Honda TSB 07-614 after I got the radar obstructed warning last year in snow. Was it the tires? The electronics? Would the radar obstruction shut down features that could cause this? Or is it just me? I am very sad and confused and am really doubting my own driving abilities now. View attachment 137265
Have the OBDII read for error codes and conditions. If there was a critical failure of a system.. it should be there. I would expect both law enforcement and your insurance would do this anyway.
 

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I just dumped 4 Bridgestones that came new on my 18 EX AWD. 38K miles. They were about shot, and I could not stand them any longer. Now have Continental TrueContact Tours. Less noise, better ride, better traction, better handling all around.
 

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[
I believe you. I, too, am not new to snow and ice driving. This picture shows what happened to me Thursday night. My 2017 EX-L AWD is now totaled. Radar obstructed warning, no traction control, and the feeling like the car took over. I landed in a ditch off the side of a hill, narrowly missing a head-on crash into an oak tree. I was found 30 minutes later. Terrifying. This picture was taken before the heavy duty tow. Mind you, I've driven our 2011 Pilot AWD, 2013 Ridgeline 4WD, and 2005 Subaru Forester successfully in much worse conditions. Now, I am left wondering why it happened: I made sure the dealer updated the software per Honda TSB 07-614 after I got the radar obstructed warning last year in snow. Was it the tires? The electronics? Would the radar obstruction shut down features that could cause this? Or is it just me? I am very sad and confused and am really doubting my own driving abilities now. View attachment 137265
What snow tires do you have on this, now totaled, CR-V?
 

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I don't see how radar anything can interfere with driving. It shouldn't, and drivers shouldn't rely on it. Occasionally I read of someone complaining they wrecked their car, or nearly wrecked it, because their nanny system didn't work as it should. Well, you know what? The only "nanny system" we need is what is between our ears; all of those wrecks could have been avoided if people weren't tailgating, or driving in a matter not suitable to conditions. Not saying that happened with the wrecked CR-V above (heck, anytime you're near any sort of incline in winter weather, anything can happen), but for the most part, we just have to double down on our winter driving techniques and be extra cautious.

For winter in those conditions, snow/ice tires (not "snow rated" tires) should be used. True snow/ice tires have an abundance of small sipes to create grip, something all-season and snow-rated tires do not have.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
[
I believe you. I, too, am not new to snow and ice driving. This picture shows what happened to me Thursday night. My 2017 EX-L AWD is now totaled. Radar obstructed warning, no traction control, and the feeling like the car took over. I landed in a ditch off the side of a hill, narrowly missing a head-on crash into an oak tree. I was found 30 minutes later. Terrifying. This picture was taken before the heavy duty tow. Mind you, I've driven our 2011 Pilot AWD, 2013 Ridgeline 4WD, and 2005 Subaru Forester successfully in much worse conditions. Now, I am left wondering why it happened: I made sure the dealer updated the software per Honda TSB 07-614 after I got the radar obstructed warning last year in snow. Was it the tires? The electronics? Would the radar obstruction shut down features that could cause this? Or is it just me? I am very sad and confused and am really doubting my own driving abilities now. View attachment 137265
Wow, hopefully you weren't hurt during the accident. We get messages that our radar and other systems are not able to perform and I suspect it alerts us because ice is potentially covering the sensors and not much else. Do you feel as if the car just lost it's awd capabilities during this accident? Ours is not great in any type of turning situation where snow and ice are invoved unless we are at low speeds, it seems strange for an AWD vehicle tbh. It has a very light feel to the front end and this is the problem in my opinion, we always lose traction in the front, the front kicks out, either to the left or right and the awd system seems unable to correct the course unless I or my wife completely let off the accelerator, it feels weird and unstable. I mistakingly said that I had Bridgestone tires, they are actually BF Goodrich winter T/A tires(ice radials without studs) and I don't think that they are the problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
What tires are installed now? I have a 08 crv the tires that came with my car are bridgestone duelers worst tires in the world I'm from the boston mass area so are snow people here.i ended up getting 2 sets of tires general altimax rt43 which I love and winter time I have a set of blizzaks non studded love them.crvs from dealer new have bad choices in tires.i got 20 I out of duelers with warranty got all 4 new tires for free again and 20k out of second set free again with rotations and alignments all free.and 1000 of complaints about them and the continentals that come on them are horrible get a new set of tires with good ratings in an all season tires.pick a good tire and get s new set like I have general altimax rt43..
BF Goodrich winter T/A tires. Bridgestones were the all seasons that were bought on the vehicle. I also want to mention that my wife has had two incidents in rainy weather where she nearly hydroplaned and is frankly scared of the CRV in anything other than dry driving conditions. We leased this vehicle based on reviews but we are disappointed with it.
 
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