Honda CR-V Owners Club Forums banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of this month's Ride of the Month Challenge!

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi i am new to forum i recently bought a black 2013 exl. I love it but lighting sucks I recently bought the edm headlights but, I need wiring diagram if anyone has can they post please thanks again cisco
 

·
Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
Joined
·
10,777 Posts
Just to assist our readers, does 'EDM' mean European Domestic Market? :confused2:



If you need to switch between RHD to LHD headlights, the wiring SHOULD be plug-n-play.

Some folks in the USA have felt that fog lights are beneficial on our market's cars to suppliment the headlamps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
The wiring is different than the American lights and i can't figure it out thanks again and they are true hid headlights
 

·
Registered
'07 CR-V EX-L AWD
Joined
·
4,670 Posts
It's not true that the OE headlights are inadequate. You can go out and blow a bunch of money on so-called upgrades, but it's highly likely you're just doing it because you think it's cool. It isn't, and it isn't worth the effort. Your return on investment would be low to non-existent. And most of these upgrades are illegal.

If you really have difficulty seeing I'd advise you to take that money and use it to see an eye doctor instead. You need fancy headlights about like a Civic needs a spoiler.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks kicker for your reply and i always have hid in all of my cars so its now a waist of my investment so if you dont have help dont reply
 

·
Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
Joined
·
10,777 Posts
Def. HID projectors, thanks for the picture.

Can't help you with the wiring though. :Darn:


++++++++++


Perhaps there are HID conversion for USA headlamp vendors that have installation procedures posted on a website...and that might help you. You need ballast power and trigger signal power.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks car buff i know how to wire hid but the amber and turn signal connector are different than the American car
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
283 Posts
It's not true that the OE headlights are inadequate.
I'm going to strongly object to that statement. Quite frankly, I find the headlamps on my daughter's CR-V to be a throwback to the 'dark ages'. The root cause of the problem is the combo H4/9003 bulb. The low beams are OK. The pattern and cutoff of the reflector assembly is typical of this older design. Incandescent bulbs in projector housings are typically better, but I can live with these. Slightly better bulbs help. But they don't help for long due to tungsten darkening. I'm now in the mode of replacing her bulbs every 18 months or so.

The high beams, unfortunately, are pretty poor. And the use of the high beam filament as a DRL degrades the entire system by depositing tungsten on the inside of the envelop. Take out your bulbs and observe the black film that's stealing your light as they age. I'll post pictures of the ones I took out last year if you aren't convinced.

Most modern cars prior to the introduction of LED lighting use the "4 lamp system". Dedicated low beams and high beams. When you turn on the high beams, you also retain the wide/low spread of the low beam bulbs. They illuminate the mid-distance range, and are particularly useful for driving in dark hilly areas when cresting a hill. When the high beam distance pattern 'lifts' off the road, the low beam pattern fill in. On the 2012-2014 CR-V you are left with a huge dark region until the nose of the car points back down again. That's unacceptable in heavily populated deer areas.

We had similar H4 dual filaments on our old Odyssey, but the problem was easily solved with a minor wiring modification. Those housings were larger and able to handle the heat. I've been advised that the smaller housings of the CR-V cannot.

In the 2015 facelift, Honda addressed this shortcoming, and went to a 4 bulb system. Drive the two back to back, and the difference in illumination is striking!

So, what to do about it....

1) JDM or EDM enclosures are NOT the answer, as the beam patterns are too different from FMVSS/DOT. Illegal and potentially dangerous.

2) I hate rebased HID conversion kits. Glare city, especially in reflector housings. The 'filament' (gas discharge) is in the wrong spot. LED bulbs are generally no better, as no two makers align the LEDs the same, or correctly.

3) An entire Projector transplant could be done. Again, it likely won't provide separation of high and low patterns.

4) There are aftermarket headlamps available (Anzo and others) that pack two projectors into the space on each side. No data on quality or pattern integrity available.

5) I did look at if it's possible to swap in the grill & lights from a 2016 into a 2013. Maybe.... and a lot of cash outlay to try it. The fit looks OK, but without a full set of mechanical drawings, it's a gamble. I occasionally look for a junk yard find, and maybe over time I'll 'collect' all the parts required to try it.

Or... I'll just dump the car and move on....
 

·
Registered
2016 CRV EX-L AWD
Joined
·
427 Posts
We traded our 2008 crv to the 2016 crv. I have 130+ bulbs in the 08 and still the light output difference is huge with the new 4 bulb design which is way better.
 

·
Registered
'07 CR-V EX-L AWD
Joined
·
4,670 Posts
I'm going to strongly object to that statement. Quite frankly, I find the headlamps on my daughter's CR-V to be a throwback to the 'dark ages'. The root cause of the problem is the combo H4/9003 bulb. The low beams are OK. The pattern and cutoff of the reflector assembly is typical of this older design. Incandescent bulbs in projector housings are typically better, but I can live with these. Slightly better bulbs help. But they don't help for long due to tungsten darkening. I'm now in the mode of replacing her bulbs every 18 months or so.

The high beams, unfortunately, are pretty poor. And the use of the high beam filament as a DRL degrades the entire system by depositing tungsten on the inside of the envelop. Take out your bulbs and observe the black film that's stealing your light as they age. I'll post pictures of the ones I took out last year if you aren't convinced.

Most modern cars prior to the introduction of LED lighting use the "4 lamp system". Dedicated low beams and high beams. When you turn on the high beams, you also retain the wide/low spread of the low beam bulbs. They illuminate the mid-distance range, and are particularly useful for driving in dark hilly areas when cresting a hill. When the high beam distance pattern 'lifts' off the road, the low beam pattern fill in. On the 2012-2014 CR-V you are left with a huge dark region until the nose of the car points back down again. That's unacceptable in heavily populated deer areas.

We had similar H4 dual filaments on our old Odyssey, but the problem was easily solved with a minor wiring modification. Those housings were larger and able to handle the heat. I've been advised that the smaller housings of the CR-V cannot.

In the 2015 facelift, Honda addressed this shortcoming, and went to a 4 bulb system. Drive the two back to back, and the difference in illumination is striking!

So, what to do about it....

1) JDM or EDM enclosures are NOT the answer, as the beam patterns are too different from FMVSS/DOT. Illegal and potentially dangerous.

2) I hate rebased HID conversion kits. Glare city, especially in reflector housings. The 'filament' (gas discharge) is in the wrong spot. LED bulbs are generally no better, as no two makers align the LEDs the same, or correctly.

3) An entire Projector transplant could be done. Again, it likely won't provide separation of high and low patterns.

4) There are aftermarket headlamps available (Anzo and others) that pack two projectors into the space on each side. No data on quality or pattern integrity available.

5) I did look at if it's possible to swap in the grill & lights from a 2016 into a 2013. Maybe.... and a lot of cash outlay to try it. The fit looks OK, but without a full set of mechanical drawings, it's a gamble. I occasionally look for a junk yard find, and maybe over time I'll 'collect' all the parts required to try it.

Or... I'll just dump the car and move on....
I went back and read your post several times to see if I could get a solid idea on where you are coming from with all this. Having spent the last 25 years of my truck driving career as a nighttime linehaul driver on the same run (AUS_DFW), I have a lot of night driving experience. So that's where I come from. I will 100% agree that the "new" four-bulb systems are better than the "old" two bulb ones. It's basically the equivalent of two glass headlights compared to four. My last big truck, a 2016 Freightliner, had a two bulb system that was very good. My '07 CR-V has the old two-bulb system but to my eye, while not superior, is quite adequate. I have to conclude that you, and some of these other folks, must have a degree of night blindness, which, while it may be minimal, is enough to make your perception somewhat different from mine, and enough to make some systems inadequate to fit in your comfort zone for night driving. So I applaud your attempts at upgrades. I am all for anything that makes you safer. My main objection to some of these upgrades applies more to the accessory addicts out there who insist on running ridiculously over-bright setups for no good reason, and which have been proven to be ineffective as well as illegal. In fact, there are factory systems on some high end cars that are also proven ineffective and which do not meet federal standards. Luckily, in Texas at least, enforcement has been stepped up on this, and it's very satisfying to see a lot of these folks get big fat tickets for it.

As for me, my '07's stock headlights are fine. If I thought otherwise, I would probably do something about that, too. But in my CR-V research I've also seen plenty of YouTube videos and read forum posts that show that most of these so-called upgrades are not really effective. Now, if I could convert to a 4-light setup I might, if I thought it would make me safer. But my stock ones work just fine. So, all I can say to the rest of you is good luck. I hope you get what you need. I'd never vote against anything that improves safety. If it really does, that is. Meanwhile, I am of the opinion that my '07 is a better car than your Gen4 or 5 in all other ways.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
The stock headlights suck plain and simple. I just upgraded my 2014 to LED headlights. Look on Amazon for a company called beamtech... I bought the 9003 plug-in replacement LED headlights $38! I wish I would have done this years ago. They plug in to the existing wiring harness and have an adapter for the light itself into the receptacle. The only thing that I did was put a piece of electrical tape around the connector as it does not plug in flush there is a little bit of a gap left. Also the rubber boot that goes around the headlight cover on the inside you'll need to turn that inside out in order for it to go over the new light mount.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
The stock headlights suck plain and simple. I just upgraded my 2014 to LED headlights. Look on Amazon for a company called beamtech... I bought the 9003 plug-in replacement LED headlights $38! I wish I would have done this years ago. They plug in to the existing wiring harness and have an adapter for the light itself into the receptacle. The only thing that I did was put a piece of electrical tape around the connector as it does not plug in flush there is a little bit of a gap left. Also the rubber boot that goes around the headlight cover on the inside you'll need to turn that inside out in order for it to go over the new light mount.
How are the high beams? Are they brighter than your prior stock? Also, do your DRLs work properly?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
The stock headlights suck plain and simple. I just upgraded my 2014 to LED headlights. Look on Amazon for a company called beamtech... I bought the 9003 plug-in replacement LED headlights $38! I wish I would have done this years ago. They plug in to the existing wiring harness and have an adapter for the light itself into the receptacle. The only thing that I did was put a piece of electrical tape around the connector as it does not plug in flush there is a little bit of a gap left. Also the rubber boot that goes around the headlight cover on the inside you'll need to turn that inside out in order for it to go over the new light mount.
So, if I am reading everyone's threads correctly, Oldwarrior's solution seems to be the easiest and cheapest. I think I might try this. I am just waiting on the answer to the question posed by wb5dx regarding hi-beams and DRL's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,527 Posts
I didn't make it through the debate. I do somewhat agree with kloker a little on the overwhelming push for HID/LED aftermarket headlights but for a different reason. First is it isn't drivers eyes as much as all the blue light of dash lighting systems that cause inadequacy of headlights. Some OEM headlights do suck but it's the bulbs and tiny wiring more than anything. Problem with aftermarket is that it is blinding to oncoming traffic. Those that deny this forget they have to drive on perfectly flat ground or that cut off does squat.

That said, Europes regulations on headlights are the same if not stricter than ours pretty much. So nothing out of wack there. Want them GO FOR IT!!!

As for wiring, instead of diagram, digital multi-meter is the next best fix. What's got power when and what is ground. As long as you don't cross hot and ground which a DMM can sort out, your fine.

Just splice in the connectors needed in place of your OEM connectors and done!

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
The stock headlights suck plain and simple. I just upgraded my 2014 to LED headlights. Look on Amazon for a company called beamtech... I bought the 9003 plug-in replacement LED headlights $38! I wish I would have done this years ago. They plug in to the existing wiring harness and have an adapter for the light itself into the receptacle. The only thing that I did was put a piece of electrical tape around the connector as it does not plug in flush there is a little bit of a gap left. Also the rubber boot that goes around the headlight cover on the inside you'll need to turn that inside out in order for it to go over the new light mount.
Oldwarrior40 ... so, how are those LED headlights? Do the DRLs work? There are several of us wanting to update our headlights as well, keeping all of the designed features intact.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
283 Posts
I went back and read your post several times to see if I could get a solid idea on where you are coming from with all this. Having spent the last 25 years of my truck driving career as a nighttime linehaul driver on the same run (AUS_DFW), I have a lot of night driving experience. So that's where I come from. I will 100% agree that the "new" four-bulb systems are better than the "old" two bulb ones. It's basically the equivalent of two glass headlights compared to four. My last big truck, a 2016 Freightliner, had a two bulb system that was very good. My '07 CR-V has the old two-bulb system but to my eye, while not superior, is quite adequate. I have to conclude that you, and some of these other folks, must have a degree of night blindness, which, while it may be minimal, is enough to make your perception somewhat different from mine, and enough to make some systems inadequate to fit in your comfort zone for night driving. So I applaud your attempts at upgrades. I am all for anything that makes you safer. My main objection to some of these upgrades applies more to the accessory addicts out there who insist on running ridiculously over-bright setups for no good reason, and which have been proven to be ineffective as well as illegal. In fact, there are factory systems on some high end cars that are also proven ineffective and which do not meet federal standards. Luckily, in Texas at least, enforcement has been stepped up on this, and it's very satisfying to see a lot of these folks get big fat tickets for it.

As for me, my '07's stock headlights are fine. If I thought otherwise, I would probably do something about that, too. But in my CR-V research I've also seen plenty of YouTube videos and read forum posts that show that most of these so-called upgrades are not really effective. Now, if I could convert to a 4-light setup I might, if I thought it would make me safer. But my stock ones work just fine. So, all I can say to the rest of you is good luck. I hope you get what you need. I'd never vote against anything that improves safety. If it really does, that is. Meanwhile, I am of the opinion that my '07 is a better car than your Gen4 or 5 in all other ways.
I see that you've edited again.... Let's stay with your original objections to my reply.

I'm sure that as we age we all have some added degree of night blindness, but I assure you that's not what's a play here. You mentioned that your long-haul driving is in a truck (somewhat elevated headlamps vs a passenger car) and your Austin to DFW run is relatively flat. My terrain is anything but flat, and too often I find that the H4 high beam is doing a great job of illuminating the trees and not the road no matter how much I tilt them downward. It's the nature of the design, and it's decidedly late 1960's technology.

You'll have to forgive my crude powerpoint drawing, but it's meant to illustrate the shortcomings of a system that lacks low beam bulbs that stay on with the high beams and this cuts midfield illumination on flat ground. When you crest a hill, it's the midfield illumination that ultimate lights up the road a few hundred feet ahead, while your high beams are lifted off the road and lighting the distant trees. I want that full field back!

I'm still making physical measurements and examining ways to modify the existing system within legal limits. Stay tuned....
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,527 Posts
EU headlights are pretty strict, just make sure the low beam cut off is aimed correctly and don't put in some crazy bright aftermarket bulbs and your good. Don't have to worry about high beams as there is no real requirement for high beams (just cannot be TOO bright). Low beams are what you have to watch

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
2016 CRV Touring AWD
Joined
·
3,776 Posts
I hate the US beam pattern that's designed to spray light upwards so you can read street signs.
Euro headlights as Tigris says have a very strict beck pattern that doesn't do this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,120 Posts
I'm lurking in these headlight threads because like others say, the Gen 3 headlights are horrible, especially for those of us who can't see well at night. One thing I improved was by buying more expensive replacement bulbs--I had one of my headlights burn out in Colorado, so I replaced both with whatever the store had available, and picked one that was at least $35 for the pair. The beam is much whiter (definitely not blue), and it throws the light further down the road. The only drawback is that brighter bulbs have a much shorter life, so I don't expect them to last very long.

The one set of LEDs I like, from a technical standpoint, are the Philips Ultinon, as they took care to match the beam pattern and cutoff of standard halogen bulbs. But they are not available in the US except through resellers (I'm thinking grey market). Here is one source, and it needs a PWM adapter to use the DRL feature in the car.
https://www.xenondepot.com/h4-philips-12953BWX2-LED-Bulb-p/12953bwx2.htm

I've considered changing all the exterior bulbs to LED, but with our '09s being ten years old and possibly not hanging onto them much longer (too many problems), I'm not wasting the money.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top