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1998 CR-V EX 4spd auto "Big Green" completely stock with roof rack and front mud flaps
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888 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I feel I'm unusually prepared for problems on the road, but I'm curious what everybody else is doing.

My emergency equipment includes the following:

Stock CR-V equipment:
Externally mounted full size spare wheel/tire
Scissor Jack
Wheel nut wrench

My auto tool kit (which fits inside my dad's old Kmart socket wrench kit case):
Socket wrench set, including all metric sizes 4mm-19mm, spark plug sockets, 3 inch extension, 6 inch extension, u-joint, screwdriver handle for the smaller sockets, adapter for my full size torque wrench to use these sockets, and upgraded craftsman reachet handle.
Box/crescent combination wrenches 8mm, 10mm, 12mm, 14mm
Flat and Phillips screwdrivers
Needle nose pliers
Slip-joint pliers
Straight pick
Magnetic finger
Inspection mirror
Folding bucknife
Razor scrapers
Right angle screwdriver set (like a mini rachet, but for screwdriver bits)

Set of 3 safety triangles

Tubeless tire plug kit

Large truck fix-a-flat can

Ice scraper/snow brush

Bungee cords

20 foot, 16 gauge jumper cables

1 gallon gas can (empty)

1 extra quart engine oil

Folding shovel

Spare fuses

4 bottles of water

6 cliff bars

Lighter for camp fires

A couple of paper towels

A couple of cloth mechanic's rags

Tire pressure gauge

3 lanterns

Hand crank flashlight (it was brilliant at first, but now it kind of sucks and I want to replace it with a couple of good headlamps)

Local paper maps

Highway atlas for my state

Extra phone charge chords

Tire chains

Large blanket.

Everything except my blanket is stowed so that even my passengers can't tell I have it on board, which I'm particularly pleased with.

A first aid kit, and air compressor for driving OHV trails are on my wishlist ATM, maybe a fire extinguisher as well.

So what do you all carry around, or want to? How elegantly do you have it stowed?
 

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1997, 2002, 2017 my expertese lies there
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This was on my Mind the other day, thank you for posting this, WIll be moved to the Stickie as it is important for the Cold weather time. over a period this may drop down to the standard post.

I carry a few items and my Sis said do I really need the bag I got with tools can I do it differently, I said sure, we're not going far so it's just a phone call. top of the list, power bank booster charger, food that will not spoil. major important gloves and sanitizer. For me a roll of toilet paper. in the winter time Lol

again thank you for bringing this to CRVOC and be safe.
 

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2020 CR-V Hybrid EX
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523 Posts
I'd love to have a full-sized wheel and spare externally mounted.
But I have a Hybrid.
I'm hoping someone will come up with some sort of external mount eventually.
Any non-trivial trip used to result in at least one flat in the past, but it's been decades since I had one.
 

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1998 CR-V EX 4spd auto "Big Green" completely stock with roof rack and front mud flaps
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888 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I'd love to have a full-sized wheel and spare externally mounted.
But I have a Hybrid.
I'm hoping someone will come up with some sort of external mount eventually.
Any non-trivial trip used to result in at least one flat in the past, but it's been decades since I had one.
They make tow hitch mounted spare tire mounts, like for jeeps. I saw one on a Forester a couple of days ago. Usually, they'll swing out to the right so you can open the hatch.

I know American Honda says you can't tow with a hybrid, but foreign market CR-V hybrids can tow, so that means there are receivers available that fit.
 

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1998 CR-V EX 4spd auto "Big Green" completely stock with roof rack and front mud flaps
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888 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I'd love to have a full-sized wheel and spare externally mounted.
But I have a Hybrid.
I'm hoping someone will come up with some sort of external mount eventually.
Any non-trivial trip used to result in at least one flat in the past, but it's been decades since I had one.
Like this one:
 

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6 Posts
I feel I'm unusually prepared for problems on the road, but I'm curious what everybody else is doing.

My emergency equipment includes the following:

Stock CR-V equipment:
Externally mounted full size spare wheel/tire
Scissor Jack
Wheel nut wrench

My auto tool kit (which fits inside my dad's old Kmart socket wrench kit case):
Socket wrench set, including all metric sizes 4mm-19mm, spark plug sockets, 3 inch extension, 6 inch extension, u-joint, screwdriver handle for the smaller sockets, adapter for my full size torque wrench to use these sockets, and upgraded craftsman reachet handle.
Box/crescent combination wrenches 8mm, 10mm, 12mm, 14mm
Flat and Phillips screwdrivers
Needle nose pliers
Slip-joint pliers
Straight pick
Magnetic finger
Inspection mirror
Folding bucknife
Razor scrapers
Right angle screwdriver set (like a mini rachet, but for screwdriver bits)

Set of 3 safety triangles

Tubeless tire plug kit

Large truck fix-a-flat can

Ice scraper/snow brush

Bungee cords

20 foot, 16 gauge jumper cables

1 gallon gas can (empty)

1 extra quart engine oil

Folding shovel

Spare fuses

4 bottles of water

6 cliff bars

Lighter for camp fires

A couple of paper towels

A couple of cloth mechanic's rags

Tire pressure gauge

3 lanterns

Hand crank flashlight (it was brilliant at first, but now it kind of sucks and I want to replace it with a couple of good headlamps)

Local paper maps

Highway atlas for my state

Extra phone charge chords

Tire chains

Large blanket.

Everything except my blanket is stowed so that even my passengers can't tell I have it on board, which I'm particularly pleased with.

A first aid kit, and air compressor for driving OHV trails are on my wishlist ATM, maybe a fire extinguisher as well.

So what do you all carry around, or want to? How elegantly do you have it stowed?
I also carry an extensive list of items, many based on items I didn't have when I really needed them. For example, on a 1972 Buick I had to change a rear flat tire on a hill . The parking brake and transmission only to rear wheels so as soon as I jacked it up it rolled backward off the jack. Now I always carry wheel chocks in all of my cars. Other items; gloves, jumper boxes, spare bulbs, duct tape, large Swiss army knife, pepper spray. In the winter I add a small shovel, traction mats, snow brush/scraper, gallon jug of traction grit (Ecotraction pro).
 

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2020 CR-V Hybrid EX
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523 Posts
I'd add to all the above a firearm of some sort, assuming it's legal to carry one in your state or country.
You just never know, we have a lot of wild animals around here, and a gun can be a good signaling device.
I would not suggest toting one around in Massachusetts or NYC though.
I'm not a "Gun Nut", most people carry guns in their cars and trucks around here, it's perfectly legal and a wise precaution.
I do leave it home if going out of state, other states have more restrictive laws.
 

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2013 CR-V EX-L
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9 Posts
I've got all my "emergency" (and general) stuff in a plastic tote I keep behind the seats. If I ever need the space, I can just pull the tote out, and leave it at home. (Usually if I need that much room for stuff, I know about it in advance.)

With the spare tire/in the jack compartment, I have the usual jack, spare tire, and I need to get a tire iron/cheater bar for it. (My first CRV went 120,000 miles, no problems. Upgraded to a 2013 this past summer, and blew a tire on the highway 5 days after I got it. The good news was it was at night, warm, and a spot where the breakdown lane is 2 lanes wide, so I was about the best possible place for it to happen.)

I have a trailer hitch on my CRV, and it uses the only easy tow point on it. . so I got the proper shackle adapter for the hitch, and the proper size recovery strap for it. (I know you need to be carefully pulling from the hitch, but a little tug in the snow can make all the difference. I think there's also a front tow point somewhere on it. Not stuff I've ever needed before, but you never know.)

I have a regular blanket, and I got 2 mylar emergency blankets. I got the ones that have a little bit of lining on them that are supposed to be slightly more durable then the one-time use ones. (It was $10 instead of $8 on Amazon...for $2, why not.)

I have a folding metal emergency shovel. Its kinda small, but if I step on it, it will cut through harder, packed snow. Enough to get me out of a plowed-in parking space.

I bought a small fire extinguisher. I don't really know why. . .people seemed to think they were a good idea, and it was about $20.

I have a long set of jumper cables - a good heavyweight pair, not the cheapo thin ones.

I've got a window breaking tool with a seatbelt cutter in the center console.

I have a small box of all-weather matches.

I should add some glowsticks (Dollar tree has them 5/$1 - just change them yearly, they do go bad over time.) I had a flashlight, but it just sat back there, and the batteries just died, so it wasn't too much help.

Somewhere in the car is usually a granola bar or two, and a bottle of water or two. Same goes for a hoodie or sweatshirt of some sort.

It's not something I feel I particularly need, but I have a multi-purpose jumpstart pack back there. My dad found them at a good price (I think $60?) and bought a few. It has a 120v inverter, a USB charger, the jump start feature, and a little tire inflator/blower built in. (Not on my car, but in 4 months, I've used all the features on it in the garage/around the house.) Since it's kinda living in my car, I got a cheap flourescent work light I can plug in to it as well.


I'm a suburban Bostonite. I'm not really going out into the woods, or doing things where I'm likely to get really stuck or in particularly real danger, or even particularly far from civilization or a tow truck. I consider most of my safety stuff common sense items. The stuff in the box I figure would get me through 24 hours surviving on my own, IF, for some reason, say I run off the road into a snowbank. I have tools to make shelter, I can moderate my temperature, and I have food/water.
 

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2020 CR-V Hybrid EX
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523 Posts
I've got all my "emergency" (and general) stuff in a plastic tote I keep behind the seats. If I ever need the space, I can just pull the tote out, and leave it at home. (Usually if I need that much room for stuff, I know about it in advance.)

With the spare tire/in the jack compartment, I have the usual jack, spare tire, and I need to get a tire iron/cheater bar for it. (My first CRV went 120,000 miles, no problems. Upgraded to a 2013 this past summer, and blew a tire on the highway 5 days after I got it. The good news was it was at night, warm, and a spot where the breakdown lane is 2 lanes wide, so I was about the best possible place for it to happen.)

I have a trailer hitch on my CRV, and it uses the only easy tow point on it. . so I got the proper shackle adapter for the hitch, and the proper size recovery strap for it. (I know you need to be carefully pulling from the hitch, but a little tug in the snow can make all the difference. I think there's also a front tow point somewhere on it. Not stuff I've ever needed before, but you never know.)

I have a regular blanket, and I got 2 mylar emergency blankets. I got the ones that have a little bit of lining on them that are supposed to be slightly more durable then the one-time use ones. (It was $10 instead of $8 on Amazon...for $2, why not.)

I have a folding metal emergency shovel. Its kinda small, but if I step on it, it will cut through harder, packed snow. Enough to get me out of a plowed-in parking space.

I bought a small fire extinguisher. I don't really know why. . .people seemed to think they were a good idea, and it was about $20.

I have a long set of jumper cables - a good heavyweight pair, not the cheapo thin ones.

I've got a window breaking tool with a seatbelt cutter in the center console.

I have a small box of all-weather matches.

I should add some glowsticks (Dollar tree has them 5/$1 - just change them yearly, they do go bad over time.) I had a flashlight, but it just sat back there, and the batteries just died, so it wasn't too much help.

Somewhere in the car is usually a granola bar or two, and a bottle of water or two. Same goes for a hoodie or sweatshirt of some sort.

It's not something I feel I particularly need, but I have a multi-purpose jumpstart pack back there. My dad found them at a good price (I think $60?) and bought a few. It has a 120v inverter, a USB charger, the jump start feature, and a little tire inflator/blower built in. (Not on my car, but in 4 months, I've used all the features on it in the garage/around the house.) Since it's kinda living in my car, I got a cheap flourescent work light I can plug in to it as well.


I'm a suburban Bostonite. I'm not really going out into the woods, or doing things where I'm likely to get really stuck or in particularly real danger, or even particularly far from civilization or a tow truck. I consider most of my safety stuff common sense items. The stuff in the box I figure would get me through 24 hours surviving on my own, IF, for some reason, say I run off the road into a snowbank. I have tools to make shelter, I can moderate my temperature, and I have food/water.
You are certainly more prepared than most folks.
One thing I carry is a radio programmed to hit the State Police repeaters. I often travel where there is no cell coverage, but the state repeaters cover most of the state.
Technically illegal to use, but I would only do so if the emergency was so great nobody would worry about unlicensed radios. :)
 

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2013 CR-V EX-L
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9 Posts
You are certainly more prepared than most folks.
Eh, more so I went on a bit of a buying spree when I got the CRV. (I was bummed that my old one was terminally rusty, the pandemic was pretty bad at the time, and I think I actually only spent about $100 on stuff I didn't have before.)

Besides, calling this an "emergeny kit" hides the fact that my CRV is perpetually full of other random junk :p
I can say everything in it is in it for a reason. . . it doesn't mean I know what that reason is.
 

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'08 CRV EX, White. '19 Pilot EX-L, MSM. '07 Sonata, stick shift, 220k and counting, '10 Kia Forte
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127 Posts
A lot of good things on here but it all depends on your adventures, how far from civilization, etc. You tweak to what you need

All mine and kids cars have first aid kits, emergency mylar blankets, 2 wool/fleece hats/gloves, fleece blankets, 2 x 4.5 hour emergency candles (puts a lot of heat into a small space like the car), spare tires, jacks, plug kits, spare valve/core, tire gauge, folding shovels, recovery straps, shackles, 2 hitch pins (one for me one for them) stronger to put the strap direct into hitch receiver secured by pin. Water, cliff bars, TOILET PAPER, wet wipes, better quality jumper cables and a better quality (not HF) PORTABLE JUMP PACK (who will actually give you a jump with cables, not many, if they are around), Multiple knives (folding, small fixed), leatherman in each car in drivers compartment, ResQme cutter/window punch, pepper spray, paper towels, napkins, lighter, storm/waterproof matches in floating case, tweezers, razor blade or razor folding knife, some cars have small basic tool sets with wrenches/sockets needed etc, some have better slightly bigger sets, pliers needle and slip, the telescoping magnetic thing, right angle ratcheting screwdriver bit tool, cell phone/usb charger blocks (12V and 120V), cell cables (and micro to lightning/ lightning to micro adapters. tie down straps, glass cleaner, microfibers, advil, sudafed, benadryl, snowbrush, large plastic garbage bags(seal a window/shelter/garbage), electrical tape, small HF compressor (Viair also on some trips like beach), the old non broken still good serpentine belt, at least one old wiper blade (ever break one in a blizzard on the road? yup!), better quality stainless steel travel cup (not vacuum, can boil water on a fire). multiple flash lights (1-2 small single AA like this orange Terralux (some have strobe and built in SOS), glow in dark tilt head Pelican, and either a 2 or 3 D-cell maglight with strike bezel and bust a cap breaker, and a at least 1x3 AAA headlight, spare batteries (the 4 shrink wrapped BJ's pack type. LIFE STRAW. small bag with socks, underwear, shorts, sweatpants, t-shirt, sweatshirt, rain jacket/windbreaker, rain pants, head covering bug net, bug spray, baseball hat, and a book to read.

Dog treats, waste bags, folding water bowl

Most of the above fits in tucked by spare tires and maybe a small duffel/tool bag/back pack/camelbak with empty bladder/sawyer filter. I sometimes might or might not plead the 2nd and 5th amendments on travel through possible restricted areas, judged by 12, not carried by 6 for me and family.

Still need to get- decent folding backpack type solar panel with adapters/clips. Maybe a cheap HF machete. Tourniquet for all (some have). Better Green laser, long signal if needed.

There's probably some more small stuff tucked. When I was traveling through Adirondacks in winter often there was also a regular CB. Might need to consider keeping at least one of the multi-channel walkie talkies (leave batteries out but with) again for the distance/area and no cell service. 1-2 regular MRE's for a good decent meal.

Then if you need to hoof it out you can pack up the scaled down, really survive from there into back pack and mark your way.

Consider spending a bit more on a better knife, real leatherman etc. Ask Aron Ralston and watch 127 hours.
 

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1998 CR-V EX 4spd auto "Big Green" completely stock with roof rack and front mud flaps
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888 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
A lot of good things on here but it all depends on your adventures, how far from civilization, etc. You tweak to what you need

All mine and kids cars have first aid kits, emergency mylar blankets, 2 wool/fleece hats/gloves, fleece blankets, 2 x 4.5 hour emergency candles (puts a lot of heat into a small space like the car), spare tires, jacks, plug kits, spare valve/core, tire gauge, folding shovels, recovery straps, shackles, 2 hitch pins (one for me one for them) stronger to put the strap direct into hitch receiver secured by pin. Water, cliff bars, TOILET PAPER, wet wipes, better quality jumper cables and a better quality (not HF) PORTABLE JUMP PACK (who will actually give you a jump with cables, not many, if they are around), Multiple knives (folding, small fixed), leatherman in each car in drivers compartment, ResQme cutter/window punch, pepper spray, paper towels, napkins, lighter, storm/waterproof matches in floating case, tweezers, razor blade or razor folding knife, some cars have small basic tool sets with wrenches/sockets needed etc, some have better slightly bigger sets, pliers needle and slip, the telescoping magnetic thing, right angle ratcheting screwdriver bit tool, cell phone/usb charger blocks (12V and 120V), cell cables (and micro to lightning/ lightning to micro adapters. tie down straps, glass cleaner, microfibers, advil, sudafed, benadryl, snowbrush, large plastic garbage bags(seal a window/shelter/garbage), electrical tape, small HF compressor (Viair also on some trips like beach), the old non broken still good serpentine belt, at least one old wiper blade (ever break one in a blizzard on the road? yup!), better quality stainless steel travel cup (not vacuum, can boil water on a fire). multiple flash lights (1-2 small single AA like this orange Terralux (some have strobe and built in SOS), glow in dark tilt head Pelican, and either a 2 or 3 D-cell maglight with strike bezel and bust a cap breaker, and a at least 1x3 AAA headlight, spare batteries (the 4 shrink wrapped BJ's pack type. LIFE STRAW. small bag with socks, underwear, shorts, sweatpants, t-shirt, sweatshirt, rain jacket/windbreaker, rain pants, head covering bug net, bug spray, baseball hat, and a book to read.

Dog treats, waste bags, folding water bowl

Most of the above fits in tucked by spare tires and maybe a small duffel/tool bag/back pack/camelbak with empty bladder/sawyer filter. I sometimes might or might not plead the 2nd and 5th amendments on travel through possible restricted areas, judged by 12, not carried by 6 for me and family.

Still need to get- decent folding backpack type solar panel with adapters/clips. Maybe a cheap HF machete. Tourniquet for all (some have). Better Green laser, long signal if needed.

There's probably some more small stuff tucked. When I was traveling through Adirondacks in winter often there was also a regular CB. Might need to consider keeping at least one of the multi-channel walkie talkies (leave batteries out but with) again for the distance/area and no cell service. 1-2 regular MRE's for a good decent meal.

Then if you need to hoof it out you can pack up the scaled down, really survive from there into back pack and mark your way.

Consider spending a bit more on a better knife, real leatherman etc. Ask Aron Ralston and watch 127 hours.
I think my shopping list just got bigger.
 

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2020 CR-V Hybrid EX
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523 Posts
A lot of good things on here but it all depends on your adventures, how far from civilization, etc. You tweak to what you need

All mine and kids cars have first aid kits, emergency mylar blankets, 2 wool/fleece hats/gloves, fleece blankets, 2 x 4.5 hour emergency candles (puts a lot of heat into a small space like the car), spare tires, jacks, plug kits, spare valve/core, tire gauge, folding shovels, recovery straps, shackles, 2 hitch pins (one for me one for them) stronger to put the strap direct into hitch receiver secured by pin. Water, cliff bars, TOILET PAPER, wet wipes, better quality jumper cables and a better quality (not HF) PORTABLE JUMP PACK (who will actually give you a jump with cables, not many, if they are around), Multiple knives (folding, small fixed), leatherman in each car in drivers compartment, ResQme cutter/window punch, pepper spray, paper towels, napkins, lighter, storm/waterproof matches in floating case, tweezers, razor blade or razor folding knife, some cars have small basic tool sets with wrenches/sockets needed etc, some have better slightly bigger sets, pliers needle and slip, the telescoping magnetic thing, right angle ratcheting screwdriver bit tool, cell phone/usb charger blocks (12V and 120V), cell cables (and micro to lightning/ lightning to micro adapters. tie down straps, glass cleaner, microfibers, advil, sudafed, benadryl, snowbrush, large plastic garbage bags(seal a window/shelter/garbage), electrical tape, small HF compressor (Viair also on some trips like beach), the old non broken still good serpentine belt, at least one old wiper blade (ever break one in a blizzard on the road? yup!), better quality stainless steel travel cup (not vacuum, can boil water on a fire). multiple flash lights (1-2 small single AA like this orange Terralux (some have strobe and built in SOS), glow in dark tilt head Pelican, and either a 2 or 3 D-cell maglight with strike bezel and bust a cap breaker, and a at least 1x3 AAA headlight, spare batteries (the 4 shrink wrapped BJ's pack type. LIFE STRAW. small bag with socks, underwear, shorts, sweatpants, t-shirt, sweatshirt, rain jacket/windbreaker, rain pants, head covering bug net, bug spray, baseball hat, and a book to read.

Dog treats, waste bags, folding water bowl

Most of the above fits in tucked by spare tires and maybe a small duffel/tool bag/back pack/camelbak with empty bladder/sawyer filter. I sometimes might or might not plead the 2nd and 5th amendments on travel through possible restricted areas, judged by 12, not carried by 6 for me and family.

Still need to get- decent folding backpack type solar panel with adapters/clips. Maybe a cheap HF machete. Tourniquet for all (some have). Better Green laser, long signal if needed.

There's probably some more small stuff tucked. When I was traveling through Adirondacks in winter often there was also a regular CB. Might need to consider keeping at least one of the multi-channel walkie talkies (leave batteries out but with) again for the distance/area and no cell service. 1-2 regular MRE's for a good decent meal.

Then if you need to hoof it out you can pack up the scaled down, really survive from there into back pack and mark your way.

Consider spending a bit more on a better knife, real leatherman etc. Ask Aron Ralston and watch 127 hours.
Depending on where you are, Bear Spray, or a firearm, though the debate about which is better against bears rages on.
If you are going to venture far from your vehicle, maybe a Garmin or similar satellite communicator, or an outright SatPhone, if you can afford one.
 

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'08 CRV EX, White. '19 Pilot EX-L, MSM. '07 Sonata, stick shift, 220k and counting, '10 Kia Forte
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Depending on where you are, Bear Spray, or a firearm, though the debate about which is better against bears rages on.
If you are going to venture far from your vehicle, maybe a Garmin or similar satellite communicator, or an outright SatPhone, if you can afford one.
I was thinking those pending where you are. I have family in MT and they like to snowmobile etc. They carry a sat phone and GPS emergency locators as well as walkie talkies, bear spray and a .45 1911. They sent pictures of the bear cubs and some mountain lions they stumbled on.

Oh yeah and a small spool of bailing/mechanics wire (tie up that broken exhaust hanger)
 

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I was thinking those pending where you are. I have family in MT and they like to snowmobile etc. They carry a sat phone and GPS emergency locators as well as walkie talkies, bear spray and a .45 1911. They sent pictures of the bear cubs and some mountain lions they stumbled on.

Oh yeah and a small spool of bailing/mechanics wire (tie up that broken exhaust hanger)
I'd swap that .45 auto for a .44 Mag revolver. Packs more punch and far fewer things to go wrong. I've never owned an automatic that didn't jam on me once in a while. Revolvers just work.
The .45 ACP is a sub-1000 FPS round, the .44 mag can approach 1500.
 

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'08 CRV EX, White. '19 Pilot EX-L, MSM. '07 Sonata, stick shift, 220k and counting, '10 Kia Forte
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I'd swap that .45 auto for a .44 Mag revolver. Packs more punch and far fewer things to go wrong. I've never owned an automatic that didn't jam on me once in a while. Revolvers just work.
The .45 ACP is a sub-1000 FPS round, the .44 mag can approach 1500.
They might have gotten that in the meantime. They just built a new house right by one of the lifts at Big Sky and do spend a lot time outside, hiking, snowmobile etc. If I ever move out that way I'll have to remember that.

When I hunt here in NY I have the 30-06 ready, .357 S&W Revolver on hip, and normally the G17 in my pack as a last resort to put me out of my misery.

UDAP BEAR SPRAY or COUNTER ASSAULT again don't bargain shop for what you rely on.
 
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