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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Update: Engine Service Light On (O2 Sensor) 2008 CRV

My service light came on and I got a PO139 code, oxygen sensor. Is there more than one O2 sensor in the 2008 CRV and is it easy to change out? Also, is it recommended to use the Honda part or would a Bosch part work fine. A lot of cars dont do well with aftermarket )2 sensors. Looks like they are right at $100.00.

Do you get many false calls with 02 sensors? We had thunderstorms last night and wondered if that could have caused it to give a bad reading. I reset it, if it comes on again then I guess it needs to be replaced.

Thanks,
Derek
 

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DON'T use the Bosch sensor in a Honda. The OEM piece is a wide-band sensor.


There are two sensors, the issue for your code is the second (downstream) one.

I'd first inspect the wires, might be damaged from road debris or a loose heat shield.

Then, unplug it and plug it back in three times to see if a corroded connection is the issue.

You need a O2 sensor socket to change them (otherwise you might damage the wires). Otherwise it's not THAT difficult. The usual difficulties with rusty or corroded threads might apply here.


Good Luck, hopefully it won't come back. (Remember, sometimes the FIRST sensor could cause this code; the P0139 is just a symptom)


This code indicates the engine air fuel ratio is not being adjusted by the oxygen sensor signal or the ECM as expected to do so, or not adjusted as often as expected to do so once the engine is warmed or under normal engine use.

Read more at: http://www.obd-codes.com/p0139
Copyright OBD-Codes.com

Causes A code P0139 may mean that one or more of the following has happened: The oxygen sensor is faulty The wiring to the sensor is broken / frayed There is an exhaust leak Possible Solutions The simplest thing to do is to reset the code and see if it comes back. If the code comes back, the problem is more than likely the rear driver's side oxygen sensor. You will likely wind up replacing it but you should also consider these possible solutions: Check and fix any exhaust leaks Check for wiring problems (shorted, frayed wires) Check the frequency and amplitude of the oxygen sensor (advanced) Check for a deteriorating / contaminated oxygen sensor, replace if necessary Check for inlet air leaks Check the MAF sensor for proper operation

Read more at: http://www.obd-codes.com/p0139
Copyright OBD-Codes.com
 

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I had my downstream O2 sensor go bad last year and I couldn't get my socket on it because I had no clearance with the subframe. Had to take it to the dealer to get it changed. .


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Discussion Starter #4
I appreciate it guys. Have a couple more questions.

Is it alright to continue driving until May. I know it can effect gas mileage which is no big deal. I just dont want to screw up computer or catalytic converter.

How long does it normally take for service light to come back on. I know that once you reset it has to cycle through so many times before light comes back on.

Thanks Again
 

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A very rich mixture will shorten the life of the cat.
It doesn't take long for the O2 code to reappear, so if it is staying off most of the time, May will probably be fine.
Do as Carbuff2 suggested in regards to the unplugging and replugging the O2 sensor connectors to make sure the contacts are making a good connection. Also look for any wire insulation damage between those connectors and the O2 sensors.
If you do decide to replace an O2 sensor (troubleshoot it first to make sure it needs replacing) use only the proper Denso one.(too many have had problems with the Bosch one in their Hondas).
Carbuff2's suggestions are spot on.
Be sure an post back on what you did to fix it and how it worked.
Buffalo4
 

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That is a Denso 2344359 for 2007 - 2009 CR-V,~$63 USD at Rock Auto. ~$83 at Bernardi Honda OEM.

You going after the pre-cat or post-cat sensor?

Usually, O2 sensors need a 19mm (3/4") Sensor Socket. YMMV
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
That is a Denso 2344359 for 2007 - 2009 CR-V,~$63 USD at Rock Auto. ~$83 at Bernardi Honda OEM.

You going after the pre-cat or post-cat sensor?

Usually, O2 sensors need a 19mm (3/4") Sensor Socket. YMMV
In your first post you told me that a PO139 code was the second down stream sensor, so I guess that is the post cat sensor, right? However, I am very confused because when you look at the exhaust system layout they call that sensor the "middle" when I only see two O2 sensors. Is the Denso 2344359 what I need. Will this Denso brand work well on the Honda? Should I just replace both sensors. I am on a budget but want to do what is right.
 

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The downstream sensor (the one that monitors catalyst efficiency) is physically mounted in the middle of the converter. Have you looked underneath for damaged wires and checked for bad connections yet?

The Denso is OEM. So I would go with that one.


I copied the descriptions of the code from the OBD-Codes.com website. Without advanced diagnostic abilities (such as reading the waveforms of the primary (first) O2 sensor), you cannot be sure that one sensor will resolve the issue...


If I were on a budget, doing my own work, I would get under the car and check the wiring/look for damage. If the code comes back, I would replace the downstream or middle sensor; If it comes back again, I'd do the first or primary sensor.

That's the beauty of DIY...you don't get charged extra for the additional troubleshooting time!


Good Luck!
 

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Hi. Sorry to butt in on this thread and if I'm am on the wrong thread, Please point me to the right one.
I recently had a warning light come up on our 2007 CR-V. I got hold of an OBD2 reader and that gave me a P2A00 code O2 Sensor #1 failure.

I have dug around a bit and found that the Honda part number is: 36531-RZA-013. I did some further digging and have come up with a DENSO 234-0062 O2 sensor. I believe that it's the upstream (pre-cat) sensor.
How difficult is this to get at from under the car? i.e. no ramp, hoist or pit! And what size sensor wrench would I need?

I have done a bit of DIY servicing in my younger days. I changed the right rear passenger door lock just last fall.
Thank
 

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You definitely need to have the car lifted unless you look like the guy below. ;)




If you jack up the car, be sure to fit jack stands, you'll be 'wailing' on the sensor. We don't want to lose any members here.

Use a good penetrating oil like PB Blaster or Kroil (NOT WD-40).

It helps to have an O2 sensor socket like the one below. That way you won't hurt the wires. Or the wrench below it...




Here's a DIY for you:

http://www.crvownersclub.com/forums/14-problems-issues/7842-how-i-changed-oxygen-sensor-f-ratio-my-2003-crv.html


HTH

PS: Look at the SIMILAR THREADS area on the bottom of this page, too.
 

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2007 CRV LX Bank 1 sensor 1 came up as not working P2A00. Looks like no to Bosch. So Denso is the best brand?

Are these located right on the cat? Under the passenger side?

Dustin
 

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Denso is the preferred 'wide-band' sensor. Seems to work the best.

The DIY link I posted above, while for a Gen2, should be similar. Lots of pictures. :nod:
 
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