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Take the vehicle to a shop. Have them temporarily tack weld the striker in place and check to see if the tailgate latches. If eveything lines up ok finish welding it in place. Was the vehicle in an accident?
Not sure how feasible that would be. All paint etc would have to be removed for welding that area.
A plate could be fabricated spanning both holes , drilled and tapped for bolts. Could possible even be out of aluminum . Then just getting in place the next challenge
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Was the vehicle in an accident?
Not at that part of the vehicle. My daughter was in an accident at the front passenger side/corner of the car. This particular problem was from before the accident, so it's unrelated.

OK, I found some good information at the junkyard. There are three items behind that chassis part of the body with the two holes against which the striker sits. Behind that (on the inside) are three items. There is a thin sheetmetal plate that I discovered is spot welded on there. Right behind that is a metal piece that goes up and down with threaded holes lining up with the two holes on the chassis. Then, there is a strap that is welded on going horizontally over those two pieces, which is the same bent/broken strap you can see in the photos I showed earlier. The threaded piece just sits in between the plate and the strap (it is spot welded onto the strap in the middle). At the junkyard I removed the striker and put the screws back in the threaded holes and pounded it with a deadblow hammer to stretch that strap back. I then bent/broke the strap with a screwdriver and hammer from the inside. I was able to knock the threaded bar outI. I then tried to remove the plate with a screwdriver and hammer, but all I did was demolish it and it's still in there, spotwelded. Probably to remove that I'd have to drill holes from the outside through the spotwelds. I'm not going to do that. Here are some photos. The first photo is with the striker removed and you can see the threaded holes. The second photo shows what it looks like on the inside:

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In this first photo below is the bar with the two threaded holes. The second photo below shows the thin plate, which I started to try and pry off, but can't because it's welded and there's very limited reach inside there.

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I wound up demolishing that plate and gave up (see below):

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In hindsight, I suppose what would have been best is to drill out the spot welds that hold the plate to the inside of the chassis, and then remove the entire assembly with the plate, threaded bar, and possibly the strap.

Anway, what would be the way to proceed now that I have the threaded bar? Get some sheetmetal and make a plate and glue it on there? Glue on the bar after that?
 

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Not at that part of the vehicle. My daughter was in an accident at the front passenger side/corner of the car. This particular problem was from before the accident, so it's unrelated.

OK, I found some good information at the junkyard. There are three items behind that chassis part of the body with the two holes against which the striker sits. Behind that (on the inside) are three items. There is a thin sheetmetal plate that I discovered is spot welded on there. Right behind that is a metal piece that goes up and down with threaded holes lining up with the two holes on the chassis. Then, there is a strap that is welded on going horizontally over those two pieces, which is the same bent/broken strap you can see in the photos I showed earlier. The threaded piece just sits in between the plate and the strap (it is spot welded onto the strap in the middle). At the junkyard I removed the striker and put the screws back in the threaded holes and pounded it with a deadblow hammer to stretch that strap back. I then bent/broke the strap with a screwdriver and hammer from the inside. I was able to knock the threaded bar outI. I then tried to remove the plate with a screwdriver and hammer, but all I did was demolish it and it's still in there, spotwelded. Probably to remove that I'd have to drill holes from the outside through the spotwelds. I'm not going to do that. Here are some photos. The first photo is with the striker removed and you can see the threaded holes. The second photo shows what it looks like on the inside:

View attachment 139008 View attachment 139007

In this first photo below is the bar with the two threaded holes. The second photo below shows the thin plate, which I started to try and pry off, but can't because it's welded and there's very limited reach inside there.

View attachment 139010 View attachment 139009

I wound up demolishing that plate and gave up (see below):

View attachment 139011

In hindsight, I suppose what would have been best is to drill out the spot welds that hold the plate to the inside of the chassis, and then remove the entire assembly with the plate, threaded bar, and possibly the strap.

Anway, what would be the way to proceed now that I have the threaded bar? Get some sheetmetal and make a plate and glue it on there? Glue on the bar after that?
Don't think the plate is an issue or necessarily needed. Main thing is the threaded piece. You could JB Weld the threaded plate. I would bolt the striker on with the threaded plate and some JB weld when you bolt it in place.. If ever removed again the JB should hold it like the factory strap.
 

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Whatever caused it is in the past. Got to fix it. You are going to need another bolt. So its hardware store (if you are lucky) or a junk yard. That plate looks welded on to me. So when at the hardware store, find a nut that matches it.
I think the only way to fix it is to weld the nut to a piece of steel, then weld the plate to the car. Its something a skilled body shop could do.
 

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Whatever caused it is in the past. Got to fix it. You are going to need another bolt. So its hardware store (if you are lucky) or a junk yard. That plate looks welded on to me. So when at the hardware store, find a nut that matches it.
I think the only way to fix it is to weld the nut to a piece of steel, then weld the plate to the car. Its something a skilled body shop could do.
He has the threaded plate now from a salvage vehicle..
 

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Discussion Starter #26 (Edited)
Whatever caused it is in the past. Got to fix it. You are going to need another bolt. So its hardware store (if you are lucky) or a junk yard. That plate looks welded on to me. So when at the hardware store, find a nut that matches it.
I think the only way to fix it is to weld the nut to a piece of steel, then weld the plate to the car. Its something a skilled body shop could do.
Yes, I can't figure out how the thing (plate?) is just gone. The plate is spot welded to the chassis, so how can it be gone? You're right, though, it's in the past and the issue is to fix it. I already have the other bolt, which the junkyard let me have for free. The issue is about getting a welder inside that small space. I don't know if one would fit. Unless it was welded from the outside?

Don't think the plate is an issue or necessarily needed. Main thing is the threaded piece. You could JB Weld the threaded plate. I would bolt the striker on with the threaded plate and some JB weld when you bolt it in place.. If ever removed again the JB should hold it like the factory strap.
I was thinking of something like that, but had glue in mind. JB Weld might be better. I was also just thinking, though, that when I understand how the assembly works, I see that the threaded bar just kind of floats in between the thin plate and the strap, which are both spot welded. I'm thinking that the bar is supposed to move a bit to allow for adjustment of the striker so the tailgate closes correctly. I wonder if having the threaded bar locked into place is not a good thing? Not sure how to proceed. I'm almost tempted to go back to a junkyard and try and remove the entire assembly (plate, threaded bar, strap) by drilling out the spot welds from the outside. I'd have to make a guess where the spot welds are, based on their position from a viewpoint at the inside of the chassis.

The plot thickens!

EDIT: Thinking about this more.....the strap is spot welded at it's center to the center of the threaded bar, so it doesn't really "float" in there, but does have some movement still (in and out, not vertical/horizontal?) I think. Does this change anything as far as a plan to fix this?
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Got the entire assembly for $1 entry fee at another self-pick yard. Cashier didn't want to charge me for the assembly. I decided to try and pull the entire assembly by drilling out the spotwelds from the outside. I took a closer look at the CR-V in the junkyard and I could faintly see the four spot welds from the outside. I don't recall being able to see them on my daughter's CR-V, but I'll have to look at it again. Anyway, I used a center punch to mark a spot in the center of each spot weld and then drilled out the spotwelds using a small bit, about 1/8" as a pilot hole. Then I drilled them out with a 19/64" bit, which is the perfect size. After drilling three of the spot welds through, I didn't even have to go 100% through the fourth one to get the plate to dislodge. I reached back from the inside and pulled it right off and out.

The first photo shows the outside of the chassis (left curved side of photo is towards the rear of the car) and you can faintly see the four spot welds, which I have circled three in yellow and one in red. The second photo shows the striker plate assembly (or whatever it's called) from the perspective of the inside of the chassis 180 degrees flipped. The right curved side of the photo is towards the rear of the car. I've also circled the spot welds (three in yellow, one in red):

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So, I drilled 100% through the holes circled in yellow. As I was drilling through the hole circled in red, I could see the plate assembly starting to dislodge. I didn't even need to drill 100% through. I reached from the inside and pulled the plate off the chassis, so the 19/64" bit was perfect. This was much faster and easier than what I did the first time, so I recommend this technique if anyone has this issue in the future.

The mystery is what in heck happened to the inside plate assembly on my daughter's car? Nothing was drilled out, so how was it removed if it's spot welded? Inquiring minds need to know! On my daughte's car, the strap is actually spot welded partially to the chassis, unlike this one I pulled from the yard which has the strap spot welded to the plate only (and to the threaded bar, of course).

Anway, now the fun part. What's the best technique to secure this baby to the inside of my daughter's CR-V? I would have to use a dremel tool to grind out and remove what's left of the strap that is spot welded in there. Then, how to secure this assembly? I don't know if there's enough room to spot weld it from the inside. If there is, then that will do it. If there isn't, then I imagine the outside of the chassis would have to be drilled out in the exact spots? Sound right? Let me know what you think, thanks.
 

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You can just not weld or glue it. Screw will hold it. Just don'y remove both screws in the future as plate will drop
 

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IF you could not weld from the inside and IF you had to do it from the outside...

I could see one method being to drill 2 or 3 holes In your daughters car where the spot weld holes are in the salvaged plate. Then put paracord or string through those holes in the car ... and into the same holes on the salvaged plate. put some thick, slow drying epoxy or jb weld on the mating surface of the salvaged plate, and then use the cord/string to pull it up into place. Get the bolts and the striker back into place, and then cut the string. Make adjustments so the door can close. and then fill in the extra drilled holes. final result is 2 bolts holding the striker, and the plate together... and in 24 hours or something, the epoxy / jb weld can cure.

have I done this before in a car? No... are there other applications where this kind of technique works? Uh ... I’m pretty sure you don’t want to know.
 

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After all that Litzenbaum has done too fix the door striker on his daughter's CRV, I certainly would expect a really special Father's Day gift come June 21st.😃
I'm still wondering where the orginal backing plate went to.😞 Maybe the same place my 10mm sockets keep disappearing to.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
After all that Litzenbaum has done too fix the door striker on his daughter's CRV, I certainly would expect a really special Father's Day gift come June 21st.😃
I'm still wondering where the orginal backing plate went to.😞 Maybe the same place my 10mm sockets keep disappearing to.
YES! Actually she is quite grateful and even told me so today when I scored a front grille for her car at the junkyard for about $26. The original grill was stolen.

I'm also still perplexed what happened to the threaded backing plate assembly. It's definitely not at the bottom of that space. This is right up there with mysterious unexplained phenomenon, like crop circles, Bigfoot, Area 51, and the ever disappearing 10mm socket.

maybe you need glow in the dark sockets? Astro Pneumatic Tool 410 - Uv Glowing 10mm Sockets 1/4" & 3/8" Drive - 4Piece Amazon.com: Astro Pneumatic Tool 410 - Uv Glowing 10mm Sockets 1/4" & 3/8" Drive - 4Piece: Home Improvement
At first I thought you were kidding. What? It's a thing? Wow.

The car is not with me at the moment. I have a body guy who works out of his home who is aligning the new fender, which he will paint, with the bumper cover and new headlight and he might have to pull just so slightly on part of the frame. I'll have to install the striker backing plate when I get the car back, but I was looking at it again and I now see that it does have the ability to move a bit. That's why the strap is there. It does hold it in place, but the strap can bend/flex a bit after the striker is installed. The threaded piece can move fore/aft and up/down just a bit when the striker is hit with a hammer for adjusting. I need to see if the spot welds are visible from the outside of my daughter's CR-V like they are on the ones I found in the junkyard. I do not recall seeing them when I had the car. It also appears that the strap is spot welded to the chassis, whereas the plate assembly I have has the strap spotwelded only to the plate. I wonder if in the factory the method of securing the plate to the chassis was modified/changed at some point along in the production. I'll let you all know when I get the car back.

Thanks for your interest and trying to help.
 

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I had the backer piece loose and just put the bolts back in a month ago, nice and tight and it seems fine. If it comes loose I will probably use locktight on the bolts next time. If that doesn't work and it works loose I'd sand the area if possible and use jb weld. Nothing like jb weld.
 

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Discussion Starter #36 (Edited)
Eureka, I Fixed It! Job Complete! DIY explained below:

Well, it appears that mystery of the striker inside plate assembly is not as sexy as Area 51, Sasquatch, or crop circles. After opening up the plastic interior panels and taking a better 2nd look inside the chassis, the thin plate was still in place there. The first photo I took with the camera was too close and if it had been not so zoomed in, and after getting my side of my face all the way against the body of the car so I could see better, would have showed that the remaining broken strap was indeed spot welded to the thin plate which was spot welded to the chassis. The strap was broken, which means the threaded bar fell down into the chassis. I realized after another look, that the original piece lodged in there actually was the threaded bar. It's that piece circled in yellow (in the photo in post #9 above in this thread) that I first suspected of being the piece, and then later dismissed as not being the piece, and now confirm that it indeed was it. Oy vey iz mir!


yes that looks like it and could be it. go get it!
You were right. I should have trusted my original instict, which was backed by you.

It's a freaky thing that the threaded bar just happened to lodge intself in that crevice just perfectly to make it look like it belonged there. This time I had more access after the plastic panel being opened to get a better reach with my telescoping magnet amd was able to fish it out:


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Now, despite finding the threaded bar, I didn't want to reuse it, but decided to replace the entire assembly. I did confirm that the car does indeed have the four spot welds. I drilled them out to remove what was left of the plate so I could then reinstall a complete assembly. I started by using a center punch at the center of the four spot welds and then used a small drill bit to make pilot holes (photo on the left below). I then used a 18/32 drill bit, which was the true actual size to remove the spot welds (photo to the right below).

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I then put the backing plate inside the chassis and held it loosely in place with the striker and bolts. I then inserted these plastic tapered vacuum plugs tightly into the two empty holes to force the plate to be properly aligned. These two holes were never spotwelded from the factory. I suspect that they are alignment holes, which is how I used them:

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Notice above how the four holes in the plate don't exactly match up with the four holes I drilled out. I suspect these vary with each assembly coming down the line. The two holes are important to line up the plate on the inside. I then filled these holes on the outside with JB Weld epoxy as seen in the left photo below. The next day I filled the same holes as the epoxy kind of sucked into them a bit, then I filled the same holes from the inside of the chassis as seen in the right photo below (a bit messy--I'm no artist):

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I believe the JB weld applied to the inside and outside of the four spot weld holds is plenty strong enough. I saved money by not having to have my body guy spot weld them in place.

The next day I used an abrasive wheel on my dye grinder to smooth and level out the outer surface (left photo below) onto which the striker is placed. I wiped it with alcohol and did the prep work to spray paint the exposed metal (right photo below):


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I used zinc cold-galvanizing spray paint to protect the surface (left photo below). Looks nice and clean! Then I attached the striker with the bolts (2nd photo below):

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Note: For removing and reinstalling the striker bolts, I strongly recommend that an impact screwdriver be used. If you use a regular screwdriver it will be very hard to loosen, and you may damage the Phillips indent in the soft metal screw. EDIT: They are not Phillips; they are Japanese JIS indents. At the junkyard I was just barely able to get the screw bolts out with a larger, standard Phillips screwdriver and wound up stripping the bolts so I had to get another one. When I installed these bolts just moderately tight with a screwdriver, I then used my manual impact screwdriver (EDIT: I did indeed use a JIS cross/plus bit) to tighten them about as tight as they are from the factory. This is the same tool you use to remove/reinstall those two screws that hold the brake discs in place. Use this kind of tool (manual impact screwdriver with JIS cross/plus bit) if you are doing this job. It works perfectly.

Looking around there are a few similar threads. But none have that "Eureka I fixed it" post.
Hate to break it to you, but its time to start removing interior panels to get to it. Whether its there or not......
Here is the "Eureka I fixed it!" moment! You were right about removing the interior panels. I should have done that from the beginning.
 

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I always hate it when a great story ends.😔
Just for future reference Honda doesn't use Phillips head screws. They are JIS cross point heads. They require a JIS bit, a Phillips will cam out stripping the head. You can tell if it's a JIS head because has a dimple or an X stamped on the head.
 

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Looks about right but with all the different bit types out there I like to see JIS# stamped on the bit.
 
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