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hello people; It's in my head from things I've heard in the past that the same tire is needed on all 4's on a AWD vehicle. What have you heard?
IBBY
 

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Not sure what you are asking. Replace all 4 tires with ones that have same tread, perhaps? Or are you talking brand of tires?

I usually buy same brand tires when I do replace them. If I do blow out a tire, I go by how much tread is remaining. If its too little, I just replace all 4. Otherwise I replace only the single one that blew out.

I know some manufacturers (subaru) recommend you replace all 4s. And then you just replace all of them with same brand tires.
 

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The circumference of all four tires needs to be the same so that they roll at the same speed. If your front tires are a different circumference than your back tires and thus turning at different speeds, the AWD system might detect that as slippage.
 

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I personally think that depends,

All tires should be the same size, that is the important thing. One larger or wider tire can result in uneven wear and maybe even pulling to one side.


I believe where you would run into a problem is with full time systems, Subaru, BMW, VW, Audi etc.. the difference in tolerance can throw off the computer and cause your AWD system to work harder and hurt fuel economy. Although I believe that engineerings have put in some tolerances into the system, ex( people who don't rotate tires, don't check tire pressure) It is a good idea to have at least 2 tires that are the same either the front or back. I think I would be concern with mixing tire brands then to get the same exact tire that are already on your vehicle.


For part-time systems I think they aren't to fussy about it. I would still get 2 tires instead of 1 and I would put the new ones in the rear and move the rear tires to the front. Again I would get the same brand that is already on the CRV just so you don't have to worry about handling, road noise etc with a different tire brand.
Theoretically this works because the rear tires will be spinning faster than the front because they are new with better tread. Since the CRV is mostly fwd bias anyways the front will do most of the work and it should be ok.
 

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I personally think that depends,

All tires should be the same size, that is the important thing. One larger or wider tire can result in uneven wear and maybe even pulling to one side.


I believe where you would run into a problem is with full time systems, Subaru, BMW, VW, Audi etc.. the difference in tolerance can throw off the computer and cause your AWD system to work harder and hurt fuel economy. Although I believe that engineerings have put in some tolerances into the system, ex( people who don't rotate tires, don't check tire pressure) It is a good idea to have at least 2 tires that are the same either the front or back. I think I would be concern with mixing tire brands then to get the same exact tire that are already on your vehicle.


For part-time systems I think they aren't to fussy about it. I would still get 2 tires instead of 1 and I would put the new ones in the rear and move the rear tires to the front. Again I would get the same brand that is already on the CRV just so you don't have to worry about handling, road noise etc with a different tire brand.
Theoretically this works because the rear tires will be spinning faster than the front because they are new with better tread. Since the CRV is mostly fwd bias anyways the front will do most of the work and it should be ok.
You would want the new tires in the front if basing it on tire diameter, new tires will have more circumference (all 4 being being the same given size) resulting in it rotating slower than a tire with less circumference for a given distance. Faster rotation of the front in comparison to the rear engages the awd.
 

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While I agree that the newer, larger diameter tires should go to the front because of the rotational differences might cause the rear drive to kick in all the time and overheat the pump...you'll be hard pressed to find any reputable tire shop that will put new tires on front. The industry standard is to put new tires on rear to prevent oversteer...which according to the tire industry is worse than understeer (worn tires on front).

You might be able to compensate the rotational difference with air pressure...a little more up front (worn tires) and a little less on rear (new tires)...
 
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