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What would cause a torque converter seal on a 2017 CR-V to start leaking at just 33,000 miles?

I went to the dealer for an oil change and handful of warranty items to get repaired (auto high beam issues, drivers side window issues, rattling in the dash, funny smell from the oil and center display issues) and when I got my car back, the service advisor said during the multipoint inspection they found the seal around the torque converter was leaking.

The service advisor told me it needed to be repaired ASAP but didn’t have a good reason why a new car with an excellent record of performed maintence and no accidents would have this seal fail.

The only thing I found online for why this would happen is because the transmission is overheating and damaging the seal. I’ve never had any warning lights on the dash about transmission temps.

The mechanic is going to have to remove the subframe and transmission to fix this seal (under warranty). It seems like a lot of work, which makes me think this seal is never suppose to go bad and worries me why it did on my car.

Should I demand any fluids be changed as part of this service? I’m not a transmission expert, but I believe that if the torque converter seal is leaking oil, it’s transmission fluid that’s leaking, correct? And if this seal is leaking, the oil has been compromised?

Time to vent!!
This will be ten trips to the dealership for diagnostics and repairs in the 17 months I’ve owned the car! TEN!?! I’m about to sell this dumb car.

I’m really worried what’s going to fail next. Not what I was expecting when I bought a Honda.

I know every car has its problems, but the combination all the problems of my last three cars (GMC-wanted a new car is the only reason I gave it up, Acura-era of Honda transmissions that overheat/fail and cost-to-value didn’t make sense to keep, Ford-totaled when rear-ended) don’t come close to 10 trips to a mechanic for repair.

I bought this car because it was a Honda; a safe, fuel sipping and reliable Honda. It’s down to two-of-three right now; I’ve had to wait hours for repairs, get Uber’s, rent a car because there were not loaner cars available overnight and have friends give me rides places when my car was broken down...maybe I should get a bike and store it in the back of the CR-V for the next break down ?
 

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The seal on my 2014 Accord leaked from day 1. I had it replaced under warranty at 33000 miles. Was told it was a faulty seal from when the car was built. They had to drop the cvt and open it, so they replaced the transmission oil when reassembled. No more issues with it again.
 

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Someone else posted a thread that referenced an official video made for Acura SUVs. They put assembly grease on the transmission splines, which "melts" when the transmission gets hot.

This can be confused with an actual leak, when it isn't. The video says to wipe off the leakage and monitor for a reappearance. If the fluid doesn't reappear, then there isn't an actual leak.
 

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mechanical, it happens that's what warranties are for.

As for other issues, that's what happens when you want cars that do all the driving for you. too much tech, too many things to go wrong.

Anything new in the last couple years sucks. Never a good idea to buy a new vehicle that every aspect is brand new design regardless of manufacturer. This new version CRV is the only hondas to have so many issues.

Honda doesnt make fancy electronics, they normally make drivetrains that last forever but markets have forced Honda to abandon what they do best and leave put the access garbage.

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At this point I would call or email Honda Corporate, or whoever is appropriate, detail the car's history of issues, and ask for a warranty extension. I have read some reports on here where other owners have been given extensions. Otherwise I'd guess you likely have a valid lemon law case.
 

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I would be concerned. Yes, mechanical things just fail and that may be all it it. Just a bad seal or installed incorrectly. Nothing more or less.

Or it could be an out-of-round shaft or not a true, aligned shaft. In that case it likely will fail again at some point. If it lasted even as long as 33K mile, I doubt a visual inspection would not detect this. Perhaps an examination of the failed seal might give some clues however.

And the operating environment may have contributed also. I have noticed that Honda requires relatively frequent CVT changes. After the first at 15K, and 30K for subsequent ones, as I recall. Unless, as noted, in the owners manual, if you do frequent mountainous driving, change even more often No details, they just indicates this is servers operating conditions apparently. I would think towing and high speed driving in a hot climate might be an issue also, but they do not state this explicitly.

I think the high heat ai see in my CVT (sometimes 240F) probably indicates this prudent. And yes, I live in a mountainous state and see the temp in the mountains on my Scanguage.
 

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Thanks, I did not recall if they had a suggestion-it was in March 2017 when I saw this caution. I just made a mental note to be aggressive on the CVT fluid changes. I tend to maintain high cost item like transmission/diff even more aggressive then the manufacturers suggestions I did my 2017 CVT/diff both around 5k. Probably will do the CVT at 20-25k miles regardless.

In fact, I will probably do a trip today with about 4k elevations gain. But it is cold, so it will be interesting to check the CVT temp in 40F's weather.
 

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Thanks, I did not recall if they had a suggestion-it was in March 2017 when I saw this caution. I just made a mental note to be aggressive on the CVT fluid changes. I tend to maintain high cost item like transmission/diff even more aggressive then the manufacturers suggestions I did my 2017 CVT/diff both around 5k. Probably will do the CVT at 20-25k miles regardless.

I have heard some refered to the CVT's hokey puck, but it that a cooler for the CVT. It was never clear to me what it does. The Honda comment about very low speeds would seem to indicate the CVT cooler it not effective at low speeds due to air flow, I assume. If anyone know, thanks for the input.

And I assume very low speed is under 25mph or so. So technically, even in the worst mountain passage, I rarely go below 25mph. Most would be 30+ even in mountain driving on decent roads.
 

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yeap that puck they use is a joke. Been round since early 2000s accords. 99% of the reason some Honda transmissions have a crap life.

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