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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ugh! Getting my 1999 ready for sale. Has about 190k miles on it. One family history. Just installed a new B-pipe which kept if off the road for about six weeks. Just gave it a fresh oil change. Backing it off the ramps, noticed brake pedal going low, little resistance.

Brake fluid level very low. Master cylinder and lines looked dry. Pushing pedal down repeatedly, could hear a breathing diaphragm noise. Drove another car to get a big bottle of Dot3. Filled it up. Pedal felt firm. Backed it up, gonna tae it for very short drive, pedal back down low.
Looked under the car, saw rapid dripping.

Brake lines under the body are protected by a plastic slotted cover. Saw that the lines were very rusty in both directions from the leak point.
I imagine the only repair worth considering is significant replace/splice, or full line replacement.

Has anyone recently had this problem, and like to share experience and cost? I can't drive it to a repair shop, so it would have to be towed.

Other option is selling it as is, or as a parts car, or part it out myself and then send the carcass to the salvage yard.

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
never heard of flex seal. some sort of spray on application? under the body the lines are protected by a long plastic cover. being a 20 yr old car in the northeast, rust will make removing it difficult. it will have to be done to repair it though.

the one main reason to hope that this car can soldier on as a useable vehicle is that it is the rarer 5sp manual variant. only worth about $1000-$1500, thus hesitancy in dumping money into repairs.
 

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If you are able to do the repair yourself it should only be about $30. Just replace the lines from the ABS distribution block to the rubber flex hoses. You could probably even just zip tie them to the bottom of that plastic piece and leave the old ones there. I did mine a few years ago and also did the fuel lines. AutoZone sells 25 foot rolls of brake line for around $22, then you will just need 4 fittings. I think those typically come in a 5 pack. If you don't have a flaring tool or a pipe cutter you will need those too. You can buy them fairly cheap or borrow the flaring tool from AutoZone, not sure if they have a pipe cutter to borrow or not.
 

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never heard of flex seal. some sort of spray on application? under the body the lines are protected by a long plastic cover. being a 20 yr old car in the northeast, rust will make removing it difficult. it will have to be done to repair it though.

the one main reason to hope that this car can soldier on as a useable vehicle is that it is the rarer 5sp manual variant. only worth about $1000-$1500, thus hesitancy in dumping money into repairs.
Try this?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0xzN6FM5x_E
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
shryp, thx for the suggestion. i don't think i will be doing this repair myself. if i get it towed to a shop, i'll mention this alternative. honda sells ready made lines for about $50/per (considering the cost of labor, might be best to get pre-bent).

as for flex tape/seal suggestions, i don't think it is viable. passive pressure leaks are different than hydraulic pressure leaks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
well, avoided a potentially costly repair (lines plus original 190k miles rear brake set-up) by selling the vehicle as-is.
love this generation of crv, but my ownership (since 1999) has hit the wall. i do have lots of pics and memories! hope it provides the new owner with some good miles.

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I replaced the entire brake system on my '97 Jeep XJ when I got it. Took all winter long and I froze my butt off as I did not, at the time, have heat or A/C in my garage shop, though I do now. It was a New Hampshire vehicle I bought cheap off a UT college student, but it was a hard to find 2-door, 4.0L 5-speed, so I jumped on it and bit the bullet on the rust issues. No body rust but brake and suspension? Yup! The brake lines were cheap, and easy, at $5-15 each for all of them, maybe $75 total. The hard part was the front caliper bolts which were rusted solid and broke off in the suspension castings. Aargh! About $1500 total to upgrade to all brand new 4-wheel disc brakes using OEM parts (same as Ford Exploder).


On the sideways image issue, this is a long known issue with the metadata imbedded in cell phone camera images being non-standards-compliant and incompatible with computer and internet imaging metadata standards. That it is still happening is the simple result of laziness on the part of the cell phone camera app writers who cannot seem to be bothered to correct the problem, even after all these years. Maybe someday, eh? If you want to correct it, simply open the image in your computer's image software (in Windows it is the photo viewer or Paint either one), do just the tiniest size edit, and save the resulting image. When you re-post it, the error will be corrected. Unfortunately, you have to do this with any and every cell phone image, as there is no automatic fix anywhere. It is for this reason that I never, ever use my cell phone's camera. But then I have a very nice Nikon, so why would I?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
the two independent shops i spoke with thought at a minimum it would cost $3-400 to do the repair. that wouldn't include rear brake issues. with 190k on those rear brakes, i could have been looking at a complete rear replacement as well, so quit possibly another $400. and then something else could fail. i'd be underwater after selling. i did call salvage yards, feeling first gen crvs would be desirable and bring decent value. both quoted $100 scrap value! so i was in between a rock and a hard place, and decided to sell. feel fortunate that i found a buyer quickly, esp. with Fall settling in in New England.

My new ride since this Summer:

Land vehicle Vehicle Car Automotive tire Sport utility vehicle
 

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Hey all.
I'm new to the forum and new to the CRV. I just bought a 99 LX I'm giving some love to. I hit a roadblock with the brake lines and fittings. I can't find info anywhere on the diameter of the lines and tubenut thread pitch as well as what types of seals the combination use (flare, bubble). If someone out there can help with this, I would really appreciate it. Thanks.
 

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Hey all.
I'm new to the forum and new to the CRV. I just bought a 99 LX I'm giving some love to. I hit a roadblock with the brake lines and fittings. I can't find info anywhere on the diameter of the lines and tubenut thread pitch as well as what types of seals the combination use (flare, bubble). If someone out there can help with this, I would really appreciate it. Thanks.
The brake lines should be standard 3/16". Just get a 25 foot roll at an auto parts store for around $25. The fittings are metric, but I don't recall the size. If you have the old ones off the store should be able to match them up. Even if you don't have the old ones off you could most likely ask the counter guy to get a new brake flex hose or wheel cylinder and match up a fitting that fits in there to get the size.

I used standard double flares on mine when I did them.

 

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Noooo! Do NOT do that! Just go to your local high-quality auto parts store and ask for the pre-made brake lines you need. It's cheaper overall, and the work is already done. The last thing you want to do is try to custom bend them yourself. It's way to much of a pain, and simply not worth it. I replaced all the brake lines on a Jeep Cherokee rust bucket from New Hampshire. I needed about 6 or 7 lines. I got the pre-made ones and the hoses too for about $75 total. See my earlier post in this thread. They all came with the correct fittings already on them and were bent correctly. So much easier. If they have to order them it usually takes one day to get them. If you do wind up doing it the other way, you won't finish it before you find yourself wishing you had taken my advice. The thing about doing your own bending is that you can't get it exact, and exact is what is needed to keep lines from chafing or rubbing or kinking and causing more problems. Also, By the time you have the lines, the tools, and the fittings and hoses, you will find you have spent pretty much the same money or more and still have the work to do, which you will never be happy with. Just trust me on this. I've restored many vehicles over the years, and done it both ways. The pre-made way is the only way to go.

Also, never ever use some sort of stop-leak additive in brake systems. Extremely bad idea. Unsafe at best, and contaminates the entire brake system, leading to worse problems.
 

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Noooo! Do NOT do that! Just go to your local high-quality auto parts store and ask for the pre-made brake lines you need. It's cheaper overall, and the work is already done. The last thing you want to do is try to custom bend them yourself. It's way to much of a pain, and simply not worth it. I replaced all the brake lines on a Jeep Cherokee rust bucket from New Hampshire. I needed about 6 or 7 lines. I got the pre-made ones and the hoses too for about $75 total. See my earlier post in this thread. They all came with the correct fittings already on them and were bent correctly. So much easier. If they have to order them it usually takes one day to get them. If you do wind up doing it the other way, you won't finish it before you find yourself wishing you had taken my advice. The thing about doing your own bending is that you can't get it exact, and exact is what is needed to keep lines from chafing or rubbing or kinking and causing more problems. Also, By the time you have the lines, the tools, and the fittings and hoses, you will find you have spent pretty much the same money or more and still have the work to do, which you will never be happy with. Just trust me on this. I've restored many vehicles over the years, and done it both ways. The pre-made way is the only way to go.

Also, never ever use some sort of stop-leak additive in brake systems. Extremely bad idea. Unsafe at best, and contaminates the entire brake system, leading to worse problems.
I already looked for the brake line kit. I can't find it. And as far as the additives, I agree.

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I don't know where you are, but here there's no "kit." I can go down to any number of local auto parts stores here today and ask for any one or number of pre-made brake lines. If they don't have them in stock, they can get them overnight. IIRC, the Jeep I mentioned needed (for a complete set) 4 or 5 lines, which ran from $5-15 each, including the rubber hoses at the wheels. They all fit perfectly and were easy to install.
 
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