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Discussion Starter #1
What is a cost-effective schedule for changing:
- automatic transmission fluid
- brake fluid
- power steering fluid

And what is an average cost for each of those?

Thanks!
 

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Did you check the Owners Manual for the maintenance schedule?

Brake fluid needs to be changed every three years.
 

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Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
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But @racoon, doesn't the Gen3 have the maintenance minder alert system (and therefore no published 'schedule')?

I know when the Generation first came out, folks were encouraged to use the '06 schedule on the Honda Ownerlink. Then, there is the additional uncertainty if the MM was rest at an oil change without the other 'almost due' services being performed.

++++++++++

Anyway, to answer the question:

ATF and Rear Diff fluids: ~30K miles (simple drain & fill)
Brake Fluid: 3 yrs regardless of miles

Power steering: No consistent agreement, but it is easy engough to change with a turkey baster at the reservoir. Just suck out the old, pour in the new, until you use 2 - 12 ounce bottles. I did ours @ 100K miles.



PS: Don't forget to replace coolant, too.
 

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What would go wrong with too old steering fluid? How could you tell?
I just have the steering fluid replaced at the dealer by dealer recommendation, but I didn't feel anything different in the steering after the flush.

Exactly the same happened with the coolant. The car never heated up neither before nor after the flush. even in Florida's summer.

I did feel a difference when the brakes fluids was flushed. I felt the brakes more reactive.

My V is a 2008 with 50k miles. I got it six years ago with 20k miles.
 

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I found that my power steering fluid level is at the "low" mark on the reservoir, and there was a little bit of oil on top of the reservoir, making me think that the inlet o-ring probably needs to be replaced (as the fluid is probably bubbling/foaming when the engine is running).

But, I did find the proper procedure in the manual for changing the power steering pump fluid.

134784


It takes about 1L of power steering fluid to do a full drainage of the old fluid. When I pick up the o-ring, I may see what size power steering fluid bottle the dealer has and pick one or two up.

What would go wrong with too old steering fluid? How could you tell?
I just have the steering fluid replaced at the dealer by dealer recommendation, but I didn't feel anything different in the steering after the flush.
The pump fluid is also a lubricant. And as the pump wears down over the years, there could be metal particles in the fluid. There is also the possibility that there may be moisture in the fluid. Draining and refilling it starts with fresh fluid so that the pump lasts longer. Same with the engine oil, engine coolant, dual pump fluid and transmission fluid--just because a car doesn't drive any different, doesn't mean the oil or coolant didn't need to be changed. It's just a way to make sure you get the maximum life out of the components. Or to look at it another way, cheap insurance. So no worries--even if you don't feel a difference, you did the right thing! ?
 

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What would go wrong with too old steering fluid? How could you tell?
I just have the steering fluid replaced at the dealer by dealer recommendation, but I didn't feel anything different in the steering after the flush.

Exactly the same happened with the coolant. The car never heated up neither before nor after the flush. even in Florida's summer.

I did feel a difference when the brakes fluids was flushed. I felt the brakes more reactive.

My V is a 2008 with 50k miles. I got it six years ago with 20k miles.
That is probably a good sign (as long as they did indeed change the coolant & power steering fluid), because they should not feel or perform any different. Coolant is designed to keep the engine from overheating in hot weather & freezing in cold weather. Automotive fluids typically wear out over time, get dirty from the systems they flow through (thereby contributing to more wear - sort of like wet sanding), and can absorb water (brake fluid) which contaminates the fluid.
 
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