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I have a frame recall on my '11 Cr-V which only applies to rust belt cars. Can anyone on here say what they are actually looking for and if anyone has seen any evidence of this occurring?
 

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They are looking for rust through on the rear frame rails. The major issue is the front trailing arm mount came disconnect from the frame rail. The tab for this is almost 30 pages long.
 

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Everything in Moderation
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Sounds as if it is a Canadian TSB?

lizzurd, how do they fix it?
 

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Everything in Moderation
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Yikes...sort of like the Toyota Tacoma frame rust of a few years back...or the Ford Windstar and Dodge Caravan rusted rear axles.
 

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Taco chassis... most dealers had the replacement chassis in stock. Toyota's plan B was to buy the cars back and break them for parts
 

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called Kingston Honda today to get a oil change, was told of this new Recall and that they would need the 2011 CR-V all day to do this recall, all I was told was they are looking for corrosion and would apply a sealant underneath the vehicle.
I've have been looking for more info since this morning on this recall and this is forum is all I can find.
 

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I got onto the Honda Canada site and looked at the recall. They will apply corrosion protection if there is no perforation issues or compromised structure. If there is, then they will buy the vehicle from you at market value plus a non-specific additional amount. Additionally, Transport Canada said that it is possible that if the offered amount is not acceptable, you can have a free inspection at a bodyshop to see if it is repairable.

I have a 2010 CRV AWD and it is affected by this recall as I am in the Maritimes. Frankly, if it fails, then I am going to press HARD on all options for maximum benefit in my favour. I JUST bought a freaking Civic EX 18 months ago and am not looking for a second payment. I also put a new AC compressor in it in July and bought Honda rims and sensors and winters for it in 2017.

I would not trust getting it fixed at a body shop as that would almost guarantee faster rusting. I think that anyone who is affected by this should at least be additionally offered a seriously reduced interest rate on a new Honda product if that is what is chosen as the replacement.

Other benefits if the vehicle fails the inspection are that Honda will rent you a replacement till the purchasing/selling/buying process is completed.

I just hope I don't have one of the fails.
 

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I have a frame recall on my '11 Cr-V which only applies to rust belt cars. Can anyone on here say what they are actually looking for and if anyone has seen any evidence of this occurring?
It would be nice if people would list their home state or country so we could see where the recalls are going!
Is this a US problem or Canada, etc.
 

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It would be nice if people would list their home state or country so we could see where the recalls are going!
Is this a US problem or Canada, etc.
I am in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. So far as I know, the recall is intended for areas where salt is used on the roads in the winter; regardless of where you bought it. Meaning that if you bought it in Alberta or Texas and you live in a salted state/prov with it, then it is eligible for the inspection.

I spoke with the service manager this morning (Dealer is across from my office) before I went into work and he said they have done 10 so far and only one was a buyback. It was a 2008 with over 250,000 KMs. He also let me know that the buyback offers are wholesale + tax + 15%. So for us overtaxed Canadians, that is 15% + 15%. The end result is that it means the buyback is in excess of the street price on a private sale or a used car lot. Clearly, this could vary if the recall is in the US northeastern states due to lower taxes and possibly different price pressures/laws. Check the NHTSA site to see if the recall spreads to the US northeast. For Canadians, you can check your CRV by going to the Honda.ca site and using their recall lookup tool with the VIN. Alternatively, for more info, go to the Transport Canada site.

The service guys here are down to about a half day per CRV to do the full inspection and work. I am not in until March 6th so it will be a bit for me to know what is happening. Where my CRV is a 2010, it is the refresh version of the Gen3 and it is always garage parked when it is home. It also only has about 140,000 KMs on it and we rarely take it on a lot of driving in the winter. Especially since getting the GenX Civic with all the radar and toys. I will certainly drop back by when I get the prognosis on my rig.
 

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Just had my 2010 CRV inspection finished and it passed. The score at my dealership is now 76 in, 3 failed. All three were 2007/08 and were high milage. Close to the 150,000 or more mark (250k kms+)

I really wonder if the worst candidates are all in the 2007-09 and the mid model refresh are all going to be fine.
 

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All three were 2007/08 and were high milage. Close to the 150,000 or more mark (250k kms+)
Spoke with the service manager before leaving and found out two of the fails were almost 400,000 kms and one of them lived on PEI for almost its whole life, so lots of exposure to sea salt. It was a 2007. The 2008 was about 285,000 km.
 

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How did you make out? Pass or fail? The buyback offer I got wouldn't even get me a used Fit. And, I was a 16 hour drive from my home. Not a happy Honda customer.
 

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RELEASE IN THE MAGAZINE (PROTÉGEZ-VOUS) BY JULIEN AMADO FEBRUARY 21, 2019
TRANSLATED BY GOOGLE

HONDA WILL BUY CR-V WITH CORROSION PROBLEMS

If you own a Honda CR-V (2007-2011), your vehicle could suffer from corrosion problems. The manufacturer will buy the models affected by this problem.

Transport Canada recently issued a recall regarding the Honda CR-Vs sold between 2007 and 2011, as the rear of the chassis could present corrosion problems. In some cases, the rust could attack the part where the suspension elements are fixed, which would increase the risk of loss of control of the vehicle if an element came off while driving. How do I know if my vehicle is concerned? Honda is recalling 83,953 vehicles in Canada. To find out if your CR-V is part of it, visit the Honda website and enter your vehicle's 17-character identification number (VIN).

Honda buys rusty models SUVs will be inspected at dealerships who will check the strength of chassis stiffeners with a punch press. If the sheet is resistant, it means that the vehicle is safe. The dealer will then coat the rear of the chassis with a rust preventive and return the vehicle to its owner. If the sheet is pierced, it is that the vehicle is too rusty. Two solutions are then possible: the purchase of the vehicle by Honda or a second more thorough inspection. In the case of redemption, Honda will offer you a certain amount of money. A dealer who wishes to remain anonymous explained to Protect Yourself the procedure provided by Honda Canada. According to him, the redemption price, determined by an internal Honda book, will be increased by 15%, plus 15% for the inconvenience caused, plus 15% for taxes. A special offer will also be available to consumers who wish to purchase a new CR-V

In the event that a consumer refuses the buy-back offer, Honda will conduct a second, more complete inspection, which will require the dismantling of the fuel tank, part of the exhaust and the parking brake. If the vehicle passes this second test successfully, the vehicle will be repaired.

Accept or refuse the redemption? "Usually, buy-back offers are the safest option for the consumer," says George Iny, president of the Association for Motorist Protection (APA). A consumer whose CR-V 2008 is worth $ 10,000 today could recover $ 13,000 or $ 14,000 in the end, which would allow him to buy a used car a little more recent without having to pay anything. " The interest of the offer also obviously depends on the mileage and the general condition of your vehicle. If you have an SUV in very good condition with less than 100,000 km on the odometer, it may be more interesting to keep it. If, on the other hand, your vehicle is in an average condition and has an advanced mileage, you should consider the buyback option and purchase a newer vehicle. If you refuse the buyback, keep in mind that the dealer may notice during dismantling that some parts not involved in the recall are too worn (cardan, exhaust, parking brake). In this case, it is you who will then have to pay for the replacement of these parts. Think about the replacement vehicle you may need. For the recall of CR-V 2007-2011, Honda provides a rental car for a week in the case of a buyback, and for a month in the case of a repair of the structure. "In a structural repair like this, the delays are usually long, warns George Iny. If the duration of the repair exceeds the period of one month provided for the rental vehicle, the consumer may have to pay part of the rental of a vehicle. "
 

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Everything in Moderation
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Sounds as if US owners are not subject to this action.

But, Forewarned is Forearmed. I would have a mechanic/body shop inspect the rear chassis.


A neighbor down the street from us in northern NJ recently offered their '04 Saturn Vue for sale. The sign said "frame rusted'. After three months they just got rid of it. (It had the Honda V6 in it, too.)

:jawdrop:
 

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How did you make out? Pass or fail? The buyback offer I got wouldn't even get me a used Fit. And, I was a 16 hour drive from my home. Not a happy Honda customer.
Me or the OP? I made out fine. I passed. And as I noted above, my dealership was only finding the issue on the very oldest and salt exposed of the Gen3 CRVs.
 

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Had my 08 CRV in for this recall 2 weeks ago, I'm in PEI. Test failed and was offered $8,450 as a buyout, which worked out for us as we were in the process of selling when made aware of the recall. The buyout was well above what we were looking through private sale.

Only 189,000kms on the car, and I think the top end black book value was around $7k. They said the same that was mentioned above, 15% "inconvenience fee" on top of the rated value based on KM's and model. When I was in signing the papers, they showed me a printed matrix that listed each buyout based on year/model/km's. Verified my buyout price but also notice that they were offering over $11k for an 08 with <60k's. Also, at the back of the lot was a graveyard of CRV's that failed the test. Was told that they had over 30 of them so far, and more coming through each day. Seems to be more of an issue here in PEI.
 

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It's sad, but I'm hoping they will send all the failed CR-Vs to the automotive recyclers vs. just sending them all to the crushers. I almost think they might do the latter, only because some unscrupulous salvage yards might just turn around and put them back on the road.

The rear frames on our '09s look fine for now, but I hate to think another five or six years down the road, how bad they might get. My '97 is almost too rusty to work on. Many of the states in the US that experience a lot of cold weather and heavily-salted roads are going to see this condition. I just hope Honda America considers inspecting ours at some point.
 
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