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Rep from BlueDriver responded to my inquiry:

" Ten minutes after your engine shuts off the device will go in to a low powered ‘sleep mode’ to prevent premature battery depletion. While in standby there is a small power draw (<10ma), so we suggest removing your BlueDriver if you won’t be starting the engine for several weeks.

The only exception is if you have a new model Mazda SUV in which case the vehicle’s computer may fail to go to sleep with a scan tool plugged in "
Excellent! :)
 

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Neat. What tranny fluid temps do you see?

Wanna have more fun?.......turn your a/c off, sit idling for a few minutes, you'll see both coolant temps well north of 185*.:eek:
I have a 2017 CRV Touring. I read in the owner's manual to drive it easy when it's cold I think due to the turbo. I have to drive my car up a long big hill as soon as I start drive so I've always warmed the car up for at least five minutes. It is better when it's cold just to drive it immediately and kick in the cold turbo?
 

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Just got my first OBD2 scan tool and am having some fun with the live data. It's a Bluetooth model "BlueDriver" (bluedriver.com) that is well reviewed on the net, and includes enhanced code support for Honda vehicles. It can be purchased on Amazon.

Got a brand new Honda, so no chance to check any fault codes yet (hopefully not for a long while!). However I'm having some fun with the live data! A few interesting things I've noticed so far... Assuming that the ECT1 is very close to the actual engine temperature, the operating temperature of this engine is between 80C to 85C (176F to 185F). This seems to be a bit lower than most other engines. Once it reaches operating temperature, its maintained no matter the driving conditions. Whether stop n' go, or even idling for 20 minutes. The gauge on the dash will just begin to register when the temperature hits about 55C (132F), and the temperature will be at about 75C (165F) when it hits the top. It seems that the thermostat only opens up when it reaches engine operating temperature because that's when the ECT2 (radiator coolant) temperature will begin to move up.

So far my fuel trims have never been positive, with the STFT has been averaging -5.5%, and my LTFT about -8%. I've been driving around with E0, and just filled up with E10 to see if it makes a 'positive' difference as noted by some here.

Below is a picture of the live display while driving. You'll also see two graphs. They're easily created with the output data. The first one is of all the live data I'm collecting, and the second one is of just the STFT-LTFT 'zoomed' in.

It will be interesting to see how the numbers change as winter approaches. I'm not only living in a (very) cold winter region, but am also on the edge of what Honda considers 'short distance' daily commuting.

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Just got my first OBD2 scan tool and am having some fun with the live data. It's a Bluetooth model "BlueDriver" (bluedriver.com) that is well reviewed on the net, and includes enhanced code support for Honda vehicles. It can be purchased on Amazon.

Got a brand new Honda, so no chance to check any fault codes yet (hopefully not for a long while!). However I'm having some fun with the live data! A few interesting things I've noticed so far... Assuming that the ECT1 is very close to the actual engine temperature, the operating temperature of this engine is between 80C to 85C (176F to 185F). This seems to be a bit lower than most other engines. Once it reaches operating temperature, its maintained no matter the driving conditions. Whether stop n' go, or even idling for 20 minutes. The gauge on the dash will just begin to register when the temperature hits about 55C (132F), and the temperature will be at about 75C (165F) when it hits the top. It seems that the thermostat only opens up when it reaches engine operating temperature because that's when the ECT2 (radiator coolant) temperature will begin to move up.

So far my fuel trims have never been positive, with the STFT has been averaging -5.5%, and my LTFT about -8%. I've been driving around with E0, and just filled up with E10 to see if it makes a 'positive' difference as noted by some here.

Below is a picture of the live display while driving. You'll also see two graphs. They're easily created with the output data. The first one is of all the live data I'm collecting, and the second one is of just the STFT-LTFT 'zoomed' in.

It will be interesting to see how the numbers change as winter approaches. I'm not only living in a (very) cold winter region, but am also on the edge of what Honda considers 'short distance' daily commuting.

View attachment 134886

View attachment 134887

View attachment 134888
Does it give you front and back O2 sensor readings and other information on the catalytic converter?
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Does it give you front and back O2 sensor readings and other information on the catalytic converter?
I'd have to check, but they claim to not hold anything back. If your vehicle supports it, they will display it ...

Here is some info on O2 sensors from the BlueDriver.com site
 

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Discussion Starter #25 (Edited)
I have a 2017 CRV Touring. I read in the owner's manual to drive it easy when it's cold I think due to the turbo. I have to drive my car up a long big hill as soon as I start drive so I've always warmed the car up for at least five minutes. It is better when it's cold just to drive it immediately and kick in the cold turbo?
My understanding is that the vehicle is always in turbo mode. I put it in S mode for about 3k to warm it up quickly in cold mornings, which brings the RPMs up just over 2000. That's probably what you'd get going up a hill in D mode. The 0-20 oil is still very fluid in very cold temps, and IMO you've got nothing to worry about. Just don't floor it up the hill ... that's what they're talking about when they say take it easy.
 

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I have a 2017 CRV Touring. I read in the owner's manual to drive it easy when it's cold I think due to the turbo. I have to drive my car up a long big hill as soon as I start drive so I've always warmed the car up for at least five minutes. It is better when it's cold just to drive it immediately and kick in the cold turbo?
I did not see "drive easy when it is cold" in the manual, but that certainly makes common sense/logic, especially if roads are slick.. I did see "engine is harder to start in cold weather" in the manual.

My opinion is 5+ minutes idling is unnecessary......wastes gas, runs dirty, pollutes more, but it's certainly your car and not mine. A cold weather start for me is.....when the tachometer drops down to say 1200 rpm or less........drive. After cold start up and rpms have dropped to 1200 or less, engine oil has been circulated to ALL parts of the engine AND the turbo. The turbo is not under a load (like rod/crank bearings, the valve train, etc.). The turbo is free spinning, driven only exhaust gas, and lubricated with pressurized motor oil seconds after start up.

Drive easy the 1st few miles after a cold start?......yes. Extended idling?......no, in my opinion.
 

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I did not see "drive easy when it is cold" in the manual, but that certainly makes common sense/logic, especially if roads are slick.. I did see "engine is harder to start in cold weather" in the manual.
The only warning I recall from Honda is to avoid extreme accelerations until the engine is warm (which really should be common sense to drivers) as it can put undue stresses on the turbo when it is not yet up to normal temperature. Knowing how conservative Honda is.. my guess is even this would only result in premature failure if done every day... for long periods of time.
 

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If your vehicle supports it, they will display it ...
This is the key right here.... if your vehicle reports the information via OBDII..and BlueDriver firmware is configured for advanced reporting for your brand/make... then BlueDriver can and will display it if you select for it to do so.

For owners of Hondas.. BlueDriver firmware now enables reporting of advanced telemetry that is native to Hondas. This was patched in last year I believe.

There is a lot of variability across brands and makes as to what they do and do not report out via OBDII in terms of advanced telemetry, and Lemur has not incorporated all brands/models into the firmware yet. For CRV owners.... Honda is part of their advanced reporting.
 

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Great analysis and assessment. Particularly about idling being the most inefficient and least clean way to warm a modern vehicle engine. That is precisely what Honda tells owners too (and has been for years) ... start your vehicle and drive your vehicle, no warm-up required.

I suppose it is possible a resident "old school" contrarian will drop by and try to lecture you that you have it all wrong though. :p
What I would do is to start the cold engine, run for 30 seconds to ensure the oil has splashed onto the cylinder walls, etc., and then drive conservatively (don't go mashing it to the floor or aggressively driving until the temperature gauge moves off the "C" or until the blue "cold" light goes off). Yes, driving it is the best way to warm it up, but while the engine is cold, the cylinder walls are also cold so the richer fuel mixture that is occurring due to the cold temp means that fuel on the cylinder walls won't burn, but rather wash off lubrication from the cylinder walls causing greater wear if you drive it hard under those conditions. Once the engine is at operating temp, you can drive however you want with no ill effects. I've seen enough cars only a couple of years old blowing blue smoke on initial take off because the cylinders/rings are worn from this lack of lubrication due to driving hard when cold. I personally run my engine for about a minute before taking off and have never had an engine burning oil even after over 100,000 miles. I'll gladly pay for the extra fuel I burn for that minute each time rather than thousands for an engine re-ring or overhaul job.
 

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This is the key right here.... if your vehicle reports the information via OBDII..and BlueDriver firmware is configured for advanced reporting for your brand/make... then BlueDriver can and will display it if you select for it to do so.

For owners of Hondas.. BlueDriver firmware now enables reporting of advanced telemetry that is native to Hondas. This was patched in last year I believe.

There is a lot of variability across brands and makes as to what they do and do not report out via OBDII in terms of advanced telemetry, and Lemur has not incorporated all brands/models into the firmware yet. For CRV owners.... Honda is part of their advanced reporting.
BlueDriver looks pretty cool in what info you're able to obtain (for the low price). What would be really nice is for them to build in some bi-directional controls which would help diagnosing tremendously, not only in the powertrain side, but other systems as well. I look forward to seeing some programming features (like your ignition key/remote for the anti-theft system, door modules, etc.) For now it seems these "higher" functions are only available in professional scantools that cost thousands.
 

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The only warning I recall from Honda is to avoid extreme accelerations until the engine is warm (which really should be common sense to drivers) as it can put undue stresses on the turbo when it is not yet up to normal temperature. Knowing how conservative Honda is.. my guess is even this would only result in premature failure if done every day... for long periods of time.
I have not read “avoid extreme acceleration until the engine is warm” in the manual. At 600+ pages I might have missed it. Common sense seems to be diminishing.

I’m thinking “extreme acceleration”, when is the engine “warm”, when does the turbo reach “normal temperature” are all 3 very subjective, no?

The turbo is heated very rapidly by hot exhaust, no? Everything on the exhaust side heats up rapidly......even from a cold start. I suspect the turbo may have a somewhat wide range of “normal temperature” as the turbo does not have a thermostat like the motor does. I also suspect the turbo temp at idle is substantially lower than turbo temp at 75 mph. Engine coolant temp varies <10*F (fans on/car moving), idle vs 75 mph.
 

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BlueDriver looks pretty cool in what info you're able to obtain (for the low price). What would be really nice is for them to build in some bi-directional controls which would help diagnosing tremendously, not only in the powertrain side, but other systems as well. I look forward to seeing some programming features (like your ignition key/remote for the anti-theft system, door modules, etc.) For now it seems these "higher" functions are only available in professional scantools that cost thousands.
From comments I have seen from Lemur, BlueDriver does have the ability for more bidirectional communications but they have yet to implement it.

Some users are concerned about bidirectional features because if someone near your location hacks into the bluetooth connection.. they could interfere with your vehicles operation.

I do know that BlueDriver originally had a vulnerability to having the bluetooth channel hijacked (there is no requirement to enter a bluetooth code) but they fixed that a couple years back with a change to how it pairs. Now.. when you first go through the pairing process between phone/tablet and BlueDriver.. once paired.. it will refuse any other attempts to pair with another device unless you reset BlueDriver.
 

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I have not read “avoid extreme acceleration until the engine is warm” in the manual. At 600+ pages I might have missed it. Common sense seems to be diminishing.

I’m thinking “extreme acceleration”, when is the engine “warm”, when does the turbo reach “normal temperature” are all 3 very subjective, no?

The turbo is heated very rapidly by hot exhaust, no? Everything on the exhaust side heats up rapidly......even from a cold start. I suspect the turbo may have a somewhat wide range of “normal temperature” as the turbo does not have a thermostat like the motor does. I also suspect the turbo temp at idle is substantially lower than turbo temp at 75 mph. Engine coolant temp varies <10*F (fans on/car moving), idle vs 75 mph.

Page 537, US Manual:

Handling Precautions

The turbocharger is a high-precision device to obtain greater horsepower by
delivering a large volume of compressed air into the engine using a turbine driven by
the engine's exhaust gas pressure.

• When the engine is cold just after starting, avoid revving the engine or sudden
acceleration.


• Always replace the engine oil and engine oil filter according to the Maintenance
Minder. The turbine rotates at very high speeds over 100,000 rpm and its
temperature reaches over 1,292°F (700°C). It is lubricated and cooled by engine
oil. If you fail to replace the engine oil and filter at the scheduled distance or
interval, deteriorated engine oil may cause failure such as sticking and abnormal
noise of the turbine bearing.
 

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Just got my first OBD2 scan tool and am having some fun with the live data. It's a Bluetooth model "BlueDriver" (bluedriver.com) that is well reviewed on the net, and includes enhanced code support for Honda vehicles. It can be purchased on Amazon.

Got a brand new Honda, so no chance to check any fault codes yet (hopefully not for a long while!). However I'm having some fun with the live data! A few interesting things I've noticed so far... Assuming that the ECT1 is very close to the actual engine temperature, the operating temperature of this engine is between 80C to 85C (176F to 185F). This seems to be a bit lower than most other engines. Once it reaches operating temperature, its maintained no matter the driving conditions. Whether stop n' go, or even idling for 20 minutes. The gauge on the dash will just begin to register when the temperature hits about 55C (132F), and the temperature will be at about 75C (165F) when it hits the top. It seems that the thermostat only opens up when it reaches engine operating temperature because that's when the ECT2 (radiator coolant) temperature will begin to move up.

So far my fuel trims have never been positive, with the STFT has been averaging -5.5%, and my LTFT about -8%. I've been driving around with E0, and just filled up with E10 to see if it makes a 'positive' difference as noted by some here.

Below is a picture of the live display while driving. You'll also see two graphs. They're easily created with the output data. The first one is of all the live data I'm collecting, and the second one is of just the STFT-LTFT 'zoomed' in.

It will be interesting to see how the numbers change as winter approaches. I'm not only living in a (very) cold winter region, but am also on the edge of what Honda considers 'short distance' daily commuting.

View attachment 134886

View attachment 134887

View attachment 134888
 

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Just got my first OBD2 scan tool and am having some fun with the live data. It's a Bluetooth model "BlueDriver" (bluedriver.com) that is well reviewed on the net, and includes enhanced code support for Honda vehicles. It can be purchased on Amazon.

Got a brand new Honda, so no chance to check any fault codes yet (hopefully not for a long while!). However I'm having some fun with the live data! A few interesting things I've noticed so far... Assuming that the ECT1 is very close to the actual engine temperature, the operating temperature of this engine is between 80C to 85C (176F to 185F). This seems to be a bit lower than most other engines. Once it reaches operating temperature, its maintained no matter the driving conditions. Whether stop n' go, or even idling for 20 minutes. The gauge on the dash will just begin to register when the temperature hits about 55C (132F), and the temperature will be at about 75C (165F) when it hits the top. It seems that the thermostat only opens up when it reaches engine operating temperature because that's when the ECT2 (radiator coolant) temperature will begin to move up.

So far my fuel trims have never been positive, with the STFT has been averaging -5.5%, and my LTFT about -8%. I've been driving around with E0, and just filled up with E10 to see if it makes a 'positive' difference as noted by some here.

Below is a picture of the live display while driving. You'll also see two graphs. They're easily created with the output data. The first one is of all the live data I'm collecting, and the second one is of just the STFT-LTFT 'zoomed' in.

It will be interesting to see how the numbers change as winter approaches. I'm not only living in a (very) cold winter region, but am also on the edge of what Honda considers 'short distance' daily commuting.

View attachment 134886

View attachment 134887

View attachment 134888
Does it show Turbo Boost Pressure?
 

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Page 537, US Manual:
What is sudden?, what is extreme?.....again, both are subjective. Even OVER 1292*F is subjective. How much over 1292*F? How much under 1292*F.

My point was, idling a motor for an extended amount of time is wasteful and dirty. Is there a page that says extended idling is recommended?........and for how long?.......and when ambient temps are below what?
 

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What is sudden?, what is extreme?.....again, both are subjective. Even OVER 1292*F is subjective. How much over 1292*F? How much under 1292*F.

My point was, idling a motor for an extended amount of time is wasteful and dirty. Is there a page that says extended idling is recommended?........and for how long?.......and when ambient temps are below what?
We are in absolute agreement on not idling.. simply start and drive.

The sub-narrative is Honda says not to perform excessive accelerations before the engine is warmed and I provided the manual quote ... that is all. I think we are both in agreement on this as well. I simply responded to your stating you saw no such advice from Honda in the manual. :)

If you have ever tromped on the accelerator of a CRV with the 1.5T... the answer to "sudden" and "extreme" is readily apparent in my view.

How long in absolute terms before heavy accelerations? Depends.. on a range of conditions.. so no way to absolutely quantify that.. simply watch the temperature gauge to see when the engine is substantially warmed to operating temperature, that is my view on it.
 

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As you put it so well in an earlier post........use common sense.? Some where between hammer down and extended idle time.
 
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