Honda CR-V Owners Club Forums banner

41 - 59 of 59 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Just got my first OBD2 scan tool and am having some fun with the live data. It's a Bluetooth model "BlueDriver" (bluedriver.com) that is well reviewed on the net, and includes enhanced code support for Honda vehicles. It can be purchased on Amazon.

Got a brand new Honda, so no chance to check any fault codes yet (hopefully not for a long while!). However I'm having some fun with the live data! A few interesting things I've noticed so far... Assuming that the ECT1 is very close to the actual engine temperature, the operating temperature of this engine is between 80C to 85C (176F to 185F). This seems to be a bit lower than most other engines. Once it reaches operating temperature, its maintained no matter the driving conditions. Whether stop n' go, or even idling for 20 minutes. The gauge on the dash will just begin to register when the temperature hits about 55C (132F), and the temperature will be at about 75C (165F) when it hits the top. It seems that the thermostat only opens up when it reaches engine operating temperature because that's when the ECT2 (radiator coolant) temperature will begin to move up.

So far my fuel trims have never been positive, with the STFT has been averaging -5.5%, and my LTFT about -8%. I've been driving around with E0, and just filled up with E10 to see if it makes a 'positive' difference as noted by some here.

Below is a picture of the live display while driving. You'll also see two graphs. They're easily created with the output data. The first one is of all the live data I'm collecting, and the second one is of just the STFT-LTFT 'zoomed' in.

It will be interesting to see how the numbers change as winter approaches. I'm not only living in a (very) cold winter region, but am also on the edge of what Honda considers 'short distance' daily commuting.

View attachment 134886

View attachment 134887

View attachment 134888
FYI I have a scan gauge and it shows tranny temps above 200*F normally. I have seen 240F when loaded pulling a long incline. Also quite warm outside.
Can you read oil pressure? Battery charging amperage?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
361 Posts
Has anyone used their BlueDriver lately? My vehicle reports don't seem to be working properly. Communicated with BlueDriver customer support and was told they recently discovered a number of issues with the maintenance data provider, the quick version is they use an explicit lookup of year/make/model/engine values which is proving to be quite unreliable. A fix is supposed to be rolled out.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
437 Posts
Hasn't everyone been complaining about how the remote start on the CRV is useless cause idling doesn't warm it up?
That's true of most vehicles. Want almost instant heat? Get in and drive off. Put the engine under load.

Back on topic, the program I use is OBD Auto Doctor because it works on a laptop (and a phone) but I prefer the larger screen of the laptop. Also it uses WiFi and Bluetooth OBD2 readers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
587 Posts
I just got mine about 10 days ago... but have not yet plugged it and and started using it.

Interesting that LTFT appears to somewhat correlate with vehicle speed. LTFT appears to move less negative at speed, and then as your speed eases up on your trip, it begins to creep more negative. It's probably more about rpm then actual vehicle speed. Could just be coincidence.. but I'll be looking at that more closely when I install mine.

From data I have seen so far.. which is limited... these modern DI engines all appear to run at negative fuel trims. UMRdyldo was seeing this also on his new Subaru.
Neg fuel trim means rich mixture. The long term should change little except for engine speed and load. Short term is like live data at the moment. Total trim ( short plus long ) should be close to zero, but generally +/-10% or less is acceptable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
Discussion Starter #50
Neg fuel trim means rich mixture. The long term should change little except for engine speed and load. Short term is like live data at the moment. Total trim ( short plus long ) should be close to zero, but generally +/-10% or less is acceptable.
What's interesting is that my new 2020 shows fuel trims much closer to zero than my 2019 as you see in the graphs posted here.

I'll create another chart for the output on the 2020 on my drive to work tomorrow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,721 Posts
What's interesting is that my new 2020 shows fuel trims much closer to zero than my 2019 as you see in the graphs posted here.

I'll create another chart for the output on the 2020 on my drive to work tomorrow.
Just to be sure... yours is a 1.5T GDI, right? :) Not a hybrid.. which is an entirely different engine design and uses port injection.

It would be interesting to see if this is a trend with 2020s.... compared to earlier years. If so.. it means Honda has done something to 2020s to improve overall fuel trim performance. Earlier years shared fuel trim data are pretty consistently showing -10 to 15%.

Note: fuel trims are generally reported to be closer to neutral (0%) when using fuel with 10% ethanol in this particular engine in the gen5 CRV.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
Discussion Starter #54
Just to be sure... yours is a 1.5T GDI, right? :) Not a hybrid.. which is an entirely different engine design and uses port injection.

It would be interesting to see if this is a trend with 2020s.... compared to earlier years. If so.. it means Honda has done something to 2020s to improve overall fuel trim performance. Earlier years shared fuel trim data are pretty consistently showing -10 to 15%.

Note: fuel trims are generally reported to be closer to neutral (0%) when using fuel with 10% ethanol in this particular engine in the gen5 CRV.
Yes my new 2020 CRV is the 1.5t non hybrid vehicle. Due to the COVID situation (not much driving), I've only topped up half a tank so far and can't be certain of grade of gas that was already in the tank. That being said, I did not see much difference when experimenting with different octanes last time around with the 2019. It did seem to make a slightly more positive difference when using the 10% rather than 0%, but it wasn't all that spectacular.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,721 Posts
Yes my new 2020 CRV is the 1.5t non hybrid vehicle. Due to the COVID situation (not much driving), I've only topped up half a tank so far and can't be certain of grade of gas that was already in the tank. That being said, I did not see much difference when experimenting with different octanes last time around with the 2019. It did seem to make a slightly more positive difference when using the 10% rather than 0%, but it wasn't all that spectacular.
Yeah octane alone does not seem to move fuel trims much at all, but ethanol @ 10% seems to pretty consistently benefit fuel trims. But with literally hundreds of different fuel formulations across the US, even this is hard to pin down with very consistent and specific data.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
Discussion Starter #56
Here you go. Turns out I already had some saved data from a trip around the neighborhood shortly after purchasing it. The 2020CRV was only a few days old with maybe 50KM on the odometer.

138995
 
41 - 59 of 59 Posts
Top