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Interestingly, both our Accord and our CRV have Hankook tires on them, but the Accord Hankooks are superior to the SUV rated Hankooks on the CRV. The Accords Hankooks are actually performance rated tires as well as all weather rated, and low profile design .. whereas the CRVs Hankooks are NOT performance rated and are pretty much standard bulky SUV tires.
Good point. The 2013 Accord had Goodyear Assurance Fuel Max tires. I eventually replaced them with Goodyear Assurance Comfortred Touring for a better ride. The Accord was/is a joy to drive on either tire. However, the CR-V is a lot easier for getting in/out when you get older.
 

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The stock Bridgestone ecopias on my 17 are M+S and H speed rated. Only issue is tread wear and increased noise
 

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Dayum! 6 mpg better than the optimistic EPA highway number. Amazing. Double dayum!.......31 mpg city , I must be doing something wrong.
The CRV is the first vehicle I've ever owned that gets as good or better mpg than advertised!!

MPG was a big selling feature for us when we were shopping for a compact SUV as we tend to drive a lot (51,000 in two years).

Very pleased with the CRV :)

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Keep in mind that the EPA “highway” fuel economy test really isn’t a taken at a steady speed. It begins at a dead stop and then has a series of accelerations and decelerations over 13 minutes or so with a maximum speed of about 60 mph and an average speed somewhere in the 40s.

Considering this, it’s remarkable that long distance cruising economy experienced in the real world is even remotely close to the EPA estimate.
 

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That’s why we don’t see EPA 34 highway......long 150 mile non-stop jaunts at 75-80 mph have never yielded EPA highway numbers for us, regardless of the vehicle. Never seen EPA 28 city numbers either. Our city driving is being able to drive only 3-4 blocks and getting stopped by a sign or light or school zone. To us, EPA numbers are optimistic, not realistic......but there will always be exceptions.
 

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That’s why we don’t see EPA 34 highway......long 150 mile non-stop jaunts at 75-80 mph have never yielded EPA highway numbers for us, regardless of the vehicle. Never seen EPA 28 city numbers either. Our city driving is being able to drive only 3-4 blocks and getting stopped by a sign or light or school zone. To us, EPA numbers are optimistic, not realistic......but there will always be exceptions.
Thats because EPA numbers are not calculated on vehicles going 75-80 mph.

Once a vehicle gets above 70 mph the wind resistance factor is very high and gets worse for every mph faster.
And the gas mileage suffers correspondingly.

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Pretty sure most folks completely understand that EPA numbers are not realistic, but rather rough optimistic numbers. When you live in West Texas, it would take days to get out of the state, driving 60 mph. Most of our dirt roads have a 70 mph speed limit.😱
 

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It's true that EPA numbers developed in a laboratory are not realistic for real world driving, but they give a very good way to compare vehicles. That said, perhaps a vehicle with less wind resistance could get better real world highway gas mileage than another that got a better EPA rating but is not as streamlined?

Honda works hard with lightweight oil, special tires, etc. to get the best test rating, not so we spend less on gas LOL.
 

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It's true that EPA numbers developed in a laboratory are not realistic for real world driving, but they give a very good way to compare vehicles. That said, perhaps a vehicle with less wind resistance could get better real world highway gas mileage than another that got a better EPA rating but is not as streamlined?

Honda works hard with lightweight oil, special tires, etc. to get the best test rating, not so we spend less on gas LOL.
Agreed. EPA mpg testing is conducted in a controlled environment and testing profile so that all vehicles are essentially reported out to consumers on an apples to apples basis. Otherwise... each manufacturer would do things their way and skew the data to their advantage....kind of like how VW massively cheated on emissions testing a few years back.

In the real world.... with the same engine.. a mid sized sedan should outperform any SUV with the same engine... particularly in highway driving speeds due to.... better aerodynamics of the sedan chassis.
 

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I got 33 mpg driving at 72-74 mph to and from Palm Springs yesterday which included some considerable mountain climbing/driving.

I love my fuel sipper!
 

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A few months ago, I drove from Bellingham Wa to Yuma AZ. I keep a detailed record of gas purchases throughout my journey. I recently returned up north and have the following results. On the freeways (I5), I drove at 68mph ( 110KM/hr)
Here are the hand calculated numbers.
Total distance 5378 miles/8655 kms
Fuel consumption 160.666 USG -result- 33.47 miles/USG-40.19 miles /ImpG- 7.03 ltrs/100km
About 5000 miles of this was highway, the rest mixed driving.
I did not use "econ" at any time and I have the Honda Data upgrade installed.
Obviously my 17 Touring is running well. I still have OEM tires on (nearing end of life) the car. Two people on board and the back end loaded.
Wind plays a big factor on mileage IMHO. I was fortunate to not have much wind for the entire trip south and north.
 

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I've noticed that I get worse gas mileage while highway driving with cruise control set - likely because it tends to rev as needed to maintain the selected speed on big hills or to get back up to speed after the the ACC has slowed down for traffic. Without cruise control I use smooth and constant pressure on the accelerator - which can cause the speed to vary in hilly areas - to typically get better gas mileage than with cruise control. Anyone else notice this?
 

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Science: Lowest speed at the top gear will give you the best fuel economy on level ground. That is the most distance travelled for the fewest BTUs produced by that fire-air pump we call an engine. As soon as you hear the engine shift into it's highest gear, mark that speed.
 

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Is there any information available on what the gas consumption is for the 1.5T (both FWD and AWD) at different constant speeds. One of the official figures for gas consumption is specified as "highway", but the speed limit on a highway in the USA can be anything between 55 and 70 mph, which would make a significant difference in gas consumption.
I suspect that this is typical of a turbo engine, but there is a sweet spot around 65 where I can get around 35-37 on the highway (Florida= flat). Go higher and it drops like a rock. At 75, I don't get 30 on the highway. Around town, I am averaging 28.
 

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Is there any information available on what the gas consumption is for the 1.5T (both FWD and AWD) at different constant speeds. One of the official figures for gas consumption is specified as "highway", but the speed limit on a highway in the USA can be anything between 55 and 70 mph, which would make a significant difference in gas consumption.
I drive 70miles a day, mostly Highway, 65-75 mph, and the computer says I average 29.4 mph, and that is with the economy button off. If I drive strictly highway, and can get close to 32. 2017 Turing, 4wd
 

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Science: Lowest speed at the top gear will give you the best fuel economy on level ground. That is the most distance travelled for the fewest BTUs produced by that fire-air pump we call an engine. As soon as you hear the engine shift into it's highest gear, mark that speed.
Harder to tell with a CVT though. :)

For a gen5 CRV.. your best metric is by selecting the instantaneous mpg display on the instrument screen. With that, you can actually dial in and learn where the sweet spots are for this power train over the range of driving any individual driver performs. You really can pretty quickly find out when your foot on the pedal is efficient and when it is not.. and relearn your gas pedal habits with this power train for optimum fuel efficiency.
 

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I've noticed that I get worse gas mileage while highway driving with cruise control set - likely because it tends to rev as needed to maintain the selected speed on big hills or to get back up to speed after the the ACC has slowed down for traffic. Without cruise control I use smooth and constant pressure on the accelerator - which can cause the speed to vary in hilly areas - to typically get better gas mileage than with cruise control. Anyone else notice this?
It must be consistently hilly where you drive on the hwy. It is inconsistent here in So Cal. I find that using the CC results in the best MPGs because it conserves fuel on the level driving better than manual gas pedaling does.
 

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Is there any information available on what the gas consumption is for the 1.5T (both FWD and AWD) at different constant speeds. One of the official figures for gas consumption is specified as "highway", but the speed limit on a highway in the USA can be anything between 55 and 70 mph, which would make a significant difference in gas consumption.
55-70? it's 80 MPH on all interstates here.
 
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