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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was just wondering now, the gen 1 Crv engines are known to be ridiculously reliable but how reliable is the B20B engine vs the uprated B20Z in the 99 onwards Crv's?

I'm assuming probably about the same, both ridiculously reliable.

That being said I have seen people mention the 99 onwards Crv's are a lot harder to find 2hnd than the older version, which is strange because Crv's have sold progressively more vehicles every year since they were introduced. So either the newer ones conk out before the 97-98 B20B motors or owners love them so much they don't come on to the market as often.
 

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As most models go, the last year is mostly sought after due to all the kinks they’ve managed to improve over time. I can tell you how reliable my 2001 has proven to be, mainly oil changes and brake rotors/pads. This is in the span of the last five years of ownership and approximately 51k miles driven. Only one time it has failed me was when my distributor went out last year. As I’ve started a recent thread on refreshing old rubber parts, the car rode fine on shot ball joints for the past two years. From time to time, I do see 5 speed manual unicorns pop up here and there with surprisingly low mileage. I can’t say I’ve had experiences with the 97-98 models, but I feel any less horsepower than I have now, I would hate it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
As most models go, the last year is mostly sought after due to all the kinks they’ve managed to improve over time. I can tell you how reliable my 2001 has proven to be, mainly oil changes and brake rotors/pads. This is in the span of the last five years of ownership and approximately 51k miles driven. Only one time it has failed me was when my distributor went out last year. As I’ve started a recent thread on refreshing old rubber parts, the car rode fine on shot ball joints for the past two years. From time to time, I do see 5 speed manual unicorns pop up here and there with surprisingly low mileage. I can’t say I’ve had experiences with the 97-98 models, but I feel any less horsepower than I have now, I would hate it.
Do you have a link to your rubbers refreshment thread?

That's really the only thing bugging mine, like any 20yr old vehicle, even a well looked after one.

But do you reckon there's nothing between the 2 engines, the uprated compression hasn't made the B20Z engine noticeably less reliable over the long term?

How did they achieve the uprated compression?
 

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'98 EX AWD
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Slightly high piston crown and cam lobes to match?

Correct. B20Z cams have a higher lift on the intake cam. Here's some info I compiled when I was fixing my '98 B20B. I have B18B (B20Z) cams currently installed with a matching LS exhaust manifold, soon also to have a matching PR4 (LS) intake plenum.

B18B (96-01)
Camshaft Specs:
IN: 1.3274
EX 1.3200
B20Z has the same cams as the B18B
B20B has a smaller intake cam: 1.3072; exhaust cam is still the same
 

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Which engine is the one where it's really important to keep up with the valve adjustments? I had a 98 that went to 300K miles with no problems, but my 01 was in serious need of valve adjustment when I purchased it with 150K on the odometer. When I purchased the 01 I found references to that year needing occasional valve adjustments, but I can't remember off the top of my head which engine number goes with which year (and I'm a bit too lazy to look it up right now... ;-) )
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Which engine is the one where it's really important to keep up with the valve adjustments? I had a 98 that went to 300K miles with no problems, but my 01 was in serious need of valve adjustment when I purchased it with 150K on the odometer. When I purchased the 01 I found references to that year needing occasional valve adjustments, but I can't remember off the top of my head which engine number goes with which year (and I'm a bit too lazy to look it up right now... ;-) )
I think all 1st gen CRV's had that issue, when I read up about it there weren't any years that were exempt.
 

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I think all 1st gen CRV's had that issue, when I read up about it there weren't any years that were exempt.
Interesting... I wonder if they would get to the point where they quit wearing and from that point on they didn't need any adjustment. I bought the 98 with 230K on it and never checked the valves until about 290K (give or take - don't remember exactly) and the valves were still right in spec. I chat with the previous owner occasionally, but I can't remember if I ever asked him if he had the valves adjusted. I kind of doubt that they checked it too often as it was a vehicle that they didn't use a lot for several years before I bought it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Interesting... I wonder if they would get to the point where they quit wearing and from that point on they didn't need any adjustment. I bought the 98 with 230K on it and never checked the valves until about 290K (give or take - don't remember exactly) and the valves were still right in spec. I chat with the previous owner occasionally, but I can't remember if I ever asked him if he had the valves adjusted. I kind of doubt that they checked it too often as it was a vehicle that they didn't use a lot for several years before I bought it.
If I remember correctly the reason was these heads had soft valve seats and the valve would wear into the seat and eventually stay open all the time and burn mainly the exhaust valves. Often the heads were rebuilt or replaced quite early in the life of the vehicle and from then onwards would not have any further issues of this nature other than following normal valve clearance service intervals. Honda issued a warning that the original problematic heads must get checked every 30k miles for valve clearance whereas it would typically be every 80k miles or thereabouts.
 

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Hi! I just finished putting a Japanese 1999 B20Z in my 1998 manual but am still running the stock 98 computer and have not hooked up the knock sensor that came with the new engine yet. The new engine still has the older giraffe-style intake.

CRnotVtec: You obviously have seriously messed around with your engine, which should theoretically change the fuel-air map and optimal ignition timing. So I thought I would ask you: should I replace the computer for better efficiency / power output? Did you have any issues with detonation on 87 octane? Any input from anyone on this topic would be very appreciated!
 

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CRnotVtec: You obviously have seriously messed around with your engine, which should theoretically change the fuel-air map and optimal ignition timing. So I thought I would ask you: should I replace the computer for better efficiency / power output? Did you have any issues with detonation on 87 octane? Any input from anyone on this topic would be very appreciated!
In theory, the only thing I have changed is how much air the engine is getting and the flow of that air. (Slightly bigger intake cam and better flowing exhaust manifold). But like I said, I'm going to be installing the correct IM for those cams because I'm currently running the stock giraffe IM which just isn't ideal. I have not had any issues with detonation in the least. (27.5 MPG driving to SC last year)

The fuel maps between the B20Z and B20B are going to be different, so yeah you would benefit greatly from the proper ECU. However, being that you installed a JDM engine, which no knock sensor, you'll have to do the bypass trick to run a USDM ECU without a CEL.

Hope some of this helps!
 

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If I remember correctly the reason was these heads had soft valve seats and the valve would wear into the seat and eventually stay open all the time and burn mainly the exhaust valves. Often the heads were rebuilt or replaced quite early in the life of the vehicle and from then onwards would not have any further issues of this nature other than following normal valve clearance service intervals. Honda issued a warning that the original problematic heads must get checked every 30k miles for valve clearance whereas it would typically be every 80k miles or thereabouts.
I had to put in a rebuilt head on my 2001 at 178k miles after several times adjusting clearance for low power and poor fuel economy and stalling at red lights (automatic transmission). After the last adjustment two valve positions were maxed out and the post-adjustment compression check showed those two cylinders improved but still low. So maybe 10K or 15K miles later I had to replace the head. 44K later I can't remember if I had to adjust the valves since then but power and fuel economy remain good. I had not been aware of the Honda bulletin but was convinced that the issue had to be soft valve seats. p.s. When I pulled the head I found extreme cylinder glazing and had to hone the cylinders and replace the pistons and rings. That's what I get for using cheap generic PCV valves from the local auto parts store. Don't overlook replacing the PCV valve with an OEM one occasionally!
 

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Just my $0.02,

I bought my 2001 at 220k miles. Did all the necessary preventative maintenance to make her road-worthy, which was maybe like an extra $300-500. Drove her from Seattle to Indiana in Jan 2020, and just drove back. Both times the car was fully loaded, and was getting 30+ mpg. Honestly I am amazed how reliable this thing is. I was planning on trashing it or selling it after i got back from Indiana, but now I have every intention of building it.
 

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Just my $0.02,

I bought my 2001 at 220k miles. Did all the necessary preventative maintenance to make her road-worthy, which was maybe like an extra $300-500. Drove her from Seattle to Indiana in Jan 2020, and just drove back. Both times the car was fully loaded, and was getting 30+ mpg. Honestly I am amazed how reliable this thing is. I was planning on trashing it or selling it after i got back from Indiana, but now I have every intention of building it.
The ignition ignitor module gave out last week; my wife wanted to "donate" the car when the indie shop said $600+. I found a Delphi module for $63. Looks great, did/should continue to run great, drives great... cannot be replaced affordably unless maybe a generous older couple had a well-maintained single-owner they would otherwise trade or donate... but that's practically like winning the lottery... importantly, here on the Front-Range in Colorado, it has terrific all-wheel drive...
 

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1998 CR-V EX 4spd auto "Big Green" completely stock with roof rack and front mud flaps
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I've got 230k or mine and my exhaust valves still tend to run a little tight. It's not a lot. I'm sure I won't run out of adjustment for a long time, but I always adjust to the smaller end of the adjustment range (I don't like valve noise), and when I check them later, they're just a fraction too tight. Same thing happens for the intake, but intake valves run loose instead. I adjust them every other oil change. Typically, I'll have to readjust 3-8 valves each time.

My words of caution are,
1, don't over tighten the valve adjuster nuts. There's literally nothing keeping the rocker arms in the engine except that they have the rocker seat under one end, the valve under the other end, and the camshaft sitting on top. if you're too aggressive with tightening the nuts on them after adjustment, you can easily push the valve open enough for the rocker arm to come right out. It won't damage the engine, but it's a pain in the butt to put it back. Also, if the wrench slips and you accidentally punch your car in the head, you will probably have minor injuries on your hand as a result.
2, always check the valve adjustments two to three times. Usually, after I check and/or adjust all the valves, and I recheck them that after that, I will have to adjust some of them again. Usually I will just keep going through all the valves adjusting them, until I pass all cylinders once without making adjustments.
3, make sure that if you don't have a factory valve cover gasket set installed already, that you replace the valve cover gasket when you do valves. Aftermarket gaskets tend to leak a lot more easily than the factory gaskets, and the most aftermarket gaskets will not survive a valve adjustment. You can usually go through a number of valve adjustments without replacing gaskets if you have a factory gasket set.

During that adjustment is also good time to take a look at your timing belt. The timing belt is going to be very easy to see whenever you have the valve cover off, and rotating the engine several times to adjust the valves will let you see most of, if not all of, the timing belt. I would not consider that to be an exhaustive inspection, or a reason to wait longer than the usual maintenance interval to change the timing belt just because it 'looks' good, but if the belt is too loose for if it is damaged, you should be able to see that while you're adjusting the valves.
 

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One thing that I don't understand is this
from all the p75 heads being used in b18 and b20s why is the b20s the only ones with valves getting tighter. If a b18 is using the same p75 why is the b20 so problematic?
Of course I am not talking ITR, GSRs...
 
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