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Discussion Starter #1
Hello!

So a little background: I have a 2001 Honda CRV EX AWD with about 230,000 miles. Until last week; it has been a nearly perfect car. Super reliable and never any issue. Last week I stalled out and after a bit of diagnosing, I ended up replacing the distributor, wires, plugs, and fuel filter. All long overdue maintenance that I slacked on. The car has been running great for a week now.

Last night after about 20 minutes of highway driving the check engine light came on. I just have a cheap OBDII reader with Dash Command on my phone, but I was able to pull a P0400 code for Engine Gas Recirculation "A" Flow.

I don't believe these model CRV's have an EGR valve which was my first thought. Any suggestions on what troubleshooting path I should follow? I went through the Honda Service Manual for the 2000 CRV (that 1400 page monster) and could not locate P0400 anywhere.

Any suggestions on what troubleshooting route to follow? If I clear the code; it comes back about after 10-20 minutes of highway driving again. Otherwise, the car is running just fine. Maybe the gas mileage might be a bit low and acceleration is lackluster, but I'm not positive. Idling seems good. No issues starting up. Thanks in advance for any and all suggestions!
 

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Discussion Starter #2
What I have found on the P0400 code says::

Causes
- clogged or restricted EGR passages
- sticking or clogged EGR valve
- problem with EGR valve position sensor
- cracked or restricted vacuum line to the manifold absolute pressure (MAP) sensor
- clogged catalytic converter
- carbon deposits (soot) on the EGR temperature sensor (Nissan)
- faulty mass airflow sensor (MAF)
- open or short in the EGR temperature sensor circuit
- mis-routed vacuum lines
- electrical problem with the EGR valve control circuit
- engine computer problems

I wouldn't doubt my EGR passages are clogged (if I have them) but I don't believe there is a valve. It sounds like I should be checking all my vacuum lines as a next step for obvious leaks. Am I safe to continue driving to work?
 
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