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Discussion Starter #1
Hello Fellow CRV Friends,

I took my CRV in to the Honda dealership that I use to have the oil changed today. I have had them change my oil for the last 2 years. The service director came over to me and told me they had stripped out the threads and that I could either get a new oil pan (cost of $500.00) or I could put on a time sert for $100.00.

Well, I was very surprised to hear this. I went with the time sert since I could not afford the new oil pan right now. My question is: is this fairly common to happen when having the oil changed? I have 87,511 miles on my car.

The service director told me this is common and happens more than not. I was also told that the time sert is only temporary and that I will have to eventually get a new oil pan. I wonder if they fouled this up and are giving me the run around? I was told by someone who knows a lot about cars and he said it is something they did when taking out the plug.

Thank you for your comments!
 

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Epona, your CR-V's oil pan is aluminum. The plug is steel. It is possible that the oil pan threads bonded to the steel plug and that the oil-pan threads were stripped when the plug was removed, but that's highly unlikely. Not unheard of, but highly unlikely. Dissimilar metals will bond together over time, and the application of heat will accelerate that process. However, in my experience, for that to have occurred the plug would have had to have been over-tightened in the past and remained in place for an exceptionally long time before it was removed. Again, that's possible but highly unlikely.

On the other hand, it's much more likely the oil-pan plug was over-tightened when it is replaced -- the torque setting is only 29 lbs. -- and that will strip the oil-pan threads. Again, it's much more likely that's what occurred. More specifically, the "technician" (sic) probably jerked on the plug to tighten it (or crossed-threaded the plug), and that's what ruined your oil-pan's threads. This may not have been done the last time the oil was changed, but that's probably when it occurred. Of course, the technician denied responsibility. Consequently, if as you said, the only service facility you have used in the past two years is your dealership, IMHO your dealership is responsible for stripping your oil pan, and the pan should be replaced, not just temporarily repaired with a Time-Sert.

Were I you, I'd ask to speak with the store owner. Present your entire service history to him (be polite), and ask him to "make this right." If the store refuses to do this, make an appointment to speak with the regional representative. If that fails to resolve this matter in your favor, take the matter to small claims court or see a lawyer. Ultimately, IMHO the store will settle this matter rather than face the additional expense of litigation.
 

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I wholeheartedly agree with Ratchet's suggestion concerning the Dealer.
More than likely the worker was in a hurry and may have even used an impact air tool to install the plug.
Some new and young workers think it is 'neat' to use a power tool as much as possible.
If, no good result happen with the Dealer, I would install a E-Z oil drain valve or a Fumoto drain valve, that way you don't have to unscrew it anymore to change the oil, you just turn a lever. It should prevent any future stripping.
You can also do some searching on the Internet for other suggested ways to deal with a stripped oil drain threads.
Buffalo4
 

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I LOVE TimeSerts. Use them when rebuilding aluminum engines on our sports cars. Definitely a step up from a Heli-coil.

If installed properly (and the drain nut is not overtorqued) they will last forever.


Buffalo's suggestion of a Fumoto drain valve has merit if it helps you sleep at night.
 

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Hmmmm the mechanic at the dealership stripped the threads and the dealership wants YOU to pay for the repair???
I'd have demanded to speak to the manager of the service dept, dealership, then the owner if they refused to fix it at no cost to me and a big apology for the ham handed dumb ass that damaged the vehicle. I'd then call Honda USA if they refused to take care of the problem at no cost to me and an apology. If they refused I'd send them a registered letter stating the same and if not repaired immediately I'd see them in court.
File a claim in small claims court and send them the notification.
Settle outside for the cost of damages and after getting the check never do business with that shop again until the service manager is fired.

I change the oil on my '04 Accord EX and my '12 V LX all the time and have for 7 years. I've never had a problem stripping the threads...If this is a "common" event at this dealership they have problems, big problems and I'd not bring my vehicle to them for anything.
 

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+1 to what Ratchet says.

I can't believe the gall some people have (service writer in this case) asking a customer to pay to correct a mistake made by one of their employees. Especially when they (the customer) have a history with the dealership.
Please post the name of the dealership so others can avoid going there.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Epona, your CR-V's oil pan is aluminum. The plug is steel. It is possible that the oil pan threads bonded to the steel plug and that the oil-pan threads were stripped when the plug was removed, but that's highly unlikely. Not unheard of, but highly unlikely. Dissimilar metals will bond together over time, and the application of heat will accelerate that process. However, in my experience, for that to have occurred the plug would have had to have been over-tightened in the past and remained in place for an exceptionally long time before it was removed. Again, that's possible but highly unlikely.

On the other hand, it's much more likely the oil-pan plug was over-tightened when it is replaced -- the torque setting is only 29 lbs. -- and that will strip the oil-pan threads. Again, it's much more likely that's what occurred. More specifically, the "technician" (sic) probably jerked on the plug to tighten it (or crossed-threaded the plug), and that's what ruined your oil-pan's threads. This may not have been done the last time the oil was changed, but that's probably when it occurred. Of course, the technician denied responsibility. Consequently, if as you said, the only service facility you have used in the past two years is your dealership, IMHO your dealership is responsible for stripping your oil pan, and the pan should be replaced, not just temporarily repaired with a Time-Sert.

Were I you, I'd ask to speak with the store owner. Present your entire service history to him (be polite), and ask him to "make this right." If the store refuses to do this, make an appointment to speak with the regional representative. If that fails to resolve this matter in your favor, take the matter to small claims court or see a lawyer. Ultimately, IMHO the store will settle this matter rather than face the additional expense of litigation.
Thank you Ratchet for your insightful reply!

I went back to the Honda dealership this morning and I spoke to the service manager who basically told me the same thing as the service person who waited on me yesterday. He told he would look into it and get back with me today. He called and left me a message and when I called him back I could only leave a message since he didn't pick up his cell. So I am waiting to see what he will do for me. If he gives me the run around, I will write to the general manager and I will write an online comment so many can see it. Like you, my retired engineer brother said the same thing and that I should take them to small claims court.

Since I live in a hot area of the states, in northeast Texas, I was curious by your comment and if that would apply to the heat here adding more heat to the oil pan over time? Would the heat here in Texas contribute to the stripping of the oil-pan threads?

Dissimilar metals will bond together over time, and the application of heat will accelerate that process


Thank you again for your informative reply!
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
+1 to what Ratchet says.

I can't believe the gall some people have (service writer in this case) asking a customer to pay to correct a mistake made by one of their employees. Especially when they (the customer) have a history with the dealership.
Please post the name of the dealership so others can avoid going there.
Thank you 20CRV for your reply!

When I went back to the Honda dealership this morning, the same service man came out to see me when I drove up. I told him I needed to talk with the service manager. He said to me" I have all of the paperwork to show you that we are right and you are wrong. You have only done the last 4 oil changes with us. Whoever you took it to for oil changes before us is responsible for the threads stripping". I told him that I bought my CRV just over two years ago and they are the only dealership I have used to change the oil. I just asked him again to please find the service manager so the matter can be discussed. Talked with manager and he said he would look into it and get back with me. I won't hold my breath. But I will be proactive and find out what he comes up with. Here is the Honda dealership in Dallas, Texas

http://www.rustywallishonda.com/
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hmmmm the mechanic at the dealership stripped the threads and the dealership wants YOU to pay for the repair???
I'd have demanded to speak to the manager of the service dept, dealership, then the owner if they refused to fix it at no cost to me and a big apology for the ham handed dumb ass that damaged the vehicle. I'd then call Honda USA if they refused to take care of the problem at no cost to me and an apology. If they refused I'd send them a registered letter stating the same and if not repaired immediately I'd see them in court.
File a claim in small claims court and send them the notification.
Settle outside for the cost of damages and after getting the check never do business with that shop again until the service manager is fired.

I change the oil on my '04 Accord EX and my '12 V LX all the time and have for 7 years. I've never had a problem stripping the threads...If this is a "common" event at this dealership they have problems, big problems and I'd not bring my vehicle to them for anything.
Thank you Kai Winters!

This has taught me a lesson. To say I am finished with them is an understatement. If they can foul this up, I wonder what else they could do to my CRV and not tell me. I am thoroughly disgusted with their behavior. I intend to follow up in many different manners if they do not do the right thing.

I had a mechanic tell me the same thing today, that he has not ever stripped out an oil-pan.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I LOVE TimeSerts. Use them when rebuilding aluminum engines on our sports cars. Definitely a step up from a Heli-coil.

If installed properly (and the drain nut is not overtorqued) they will last forever.


Buffalo's suggestion of a Fumoto drain valve has merit if it helps you sleep at night.
Thank you Carbuff, it is good to hear that you love the TimeSerts since that was what they put on the oil-pan.

Hopefully, it will work out and keep my oil-pan maintained.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I wholeheartedly agree with Ratchet's suggestion concerning the Dealer.
More than likely the worker was in a hurry and may have even used an impact air tool to install the plug.
Some new and young workers think it is 'neat' to use a power tool as much as possible.
If, no good result happen with the Dealer, I would install a E-Z oil drain valve or a Fumoto drain valve, that way you don't have to unscrew it anymore to change the oil, you just turn a lever. It should prevent any future stripping.
You can also do some searching on the Internet for other suggested ways to deal with a stripped oil drain threads.
Buffalo4
This morning I was told they use only a mechanical instrument to take take out the bolt. But they could tell me anything now and I don't think it will carry much weight.

Thank you Buffalo4 for your comment!
 

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We are very frequently victimized by "mechanics???" that are flat rate driven rather than skill and quality driven.

Just think of all the things they mess up and hide from their customers.

Steel, aluminum, or cast iron, I haven't stripped an oil drain plus in 55 years. That's not really a boast. They are actually very hard to strip and must be highly abused.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
We are very frequently victimized by "mechanics???" that are flat rate driven rather than skill and quality driven.

Just think of all the things they mess up and hide from their customers.

Steel, aluminum, or cast iron, I haven't stripped an oil drain plus in 55 years. That's not really a boast. They are actually very hard to strip and must be highly abused.
Ohhhhhhhh, look what you just wrote! To think they are really hard to strip and must be highly abused for the threads to be stripped.

Why in the world do they insist it is my car's fault from a previous owner's oil changes? I would think they could come up with a better excuse than that one. How insane and ridiculous that sounds.

Thank you WDHenson for your insight and experience with oil-pans!
 

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More thanks guys.

I appreciate the advice between Phillips and JIS. My impact driver bits fit "crossheads" without slop, so they might be close to JIS, but I do have a screwdriver that is labelled "Phillips" and it goes unused because of the sloppy fit.

I detached the cable from the handlebar lever and dribbled in quite a lot of ATF. Will give it a day to see if any appears at the case lever.

I've got a ecopy of the GS750 Service manual and lubing the clutch cable is listed as a maintenance item.
 

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More thanks guys.

I appreciate the advice between Phillips and JIS. My impact driver bits fit "crossheads" without slop, so they might be close to JIS, but I do have a screwdriver that is labelled "Phillips" and it goes unused because of the sloppy fit.

I detached the cable from the handlebar lever and dribbled in quite a lot of ATF. Will give it a day to see if any appears at the case lever.

I've got a ecopy of the GS750 Service manual and lubing the clutch cable is listed as a maintenance item.
You probably posted the above in the wrong thread, but if you want a super corrosion (rust,etc) buster, just use about 50% acetone along with that atf.
Buffalo4
 

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Your dealer is wrong. Should have apologized for their error and offered the fix at no charge to you. I would report their activity to Honda management. There are ways to reach them. Find info in your owners manual. Furthermore, I would find another dealer even if it an hour away.

I have changed my own oil for nearly fifty years and have never stripped the threads of the drain plug. But hey, mistakes can happen. The important thing is what is done about it. Your dealer failed.
 

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Yeah do what the others said and keep going higher up until it gets fixed. Threaten to get a lawyer if they don't fix it. And if it comes to that point, get a lawyer and get it settled. IMO, they can try and blame it on previous owner or whatever else all they want, but if you've been getting your oil changed there for a while now, there's almost no possible way this was a problem before-hand.
 

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What if they said "the car fell off the lift while we were changing the oil and you have to pay for the damages"?

That's why the dealer has insurance for these kind of accidents.
 

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The mechanic could have used an impact wrench or breaker bar to tighten. Another problem that can happen is when mechanics rotate tires without a torque wrench. They can end up warping the rotors.
 

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This is just another example of why you should stay away from dealerships for service- they do the poorest quality work, charge the most and constantly try to upsell unnecessary services -their mechanics are under constant time pressure and told to push extra services to maximize dealer profits-this is the universal dealership business model -they all do it -it is well known by anyone who has ever worked for one. Try and find a good local mechanic -they will do much higher quality work.
 
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