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Discussion Starter #1
I’ve had it with the 51R battery size chosen by Honda for the Gen 5 CRV. I am on my second Honda battery, the first one was replaced under my New Car Warranty in September 2018. I know that it is totally my fiscal responsibility to replace my current battery, so I’m not going to mess around with another Honda battery. My 2017 EXL has been jump started 7 times in the last 3.5 years, way too often as far as I’m concerned. Actually each of my Honda batteries made it one whole year before they started failing, so it is really 7 jump starts in 1.5 years. So I want to replace my 51R battery with a larger battery with greater endurance.

Has anyone replaced their 51R with a larger battery that does not require any modifications to the existing battery containing hardware? Hardware like tie-downs, trays, cables, hood, etc.

I know this subject has been discussed many times before in the last 3.5 years but I don’t remember reading an actual answer to my question.
 

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larger cap bat wit hte stock altinator will only top that cap bat. bigger does not mean better,
 

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Nope... you don't need a bigger battery. Just get a NAPA The Legend Professional 51R. It's pricey, but I wish I did it sooner!
 

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larger cap bat wit hte stock altinator will only top that cap bat. bigger does not mean better,
I don't think that's how it works Fishy. The alternator is not matched to the battery capacity. It wouldn't know the difference between a lawnmower battery and one from a large diesel truck. All it's looking at is voltage. If voltage dips a little low it will ramp up and start trying to charge up the battery until it can maintain around 14V or so. In this respect, since a larger battery should be able to hold it's charge better, I would think that a larger battery would actually be a little easier on the alternator. In fact, you're the first person I've ever heard who's said that bigger isn't better when it comes to battery size.

I believe that BoostedV is correct. I'm pretty sure that the new CR-V's that come with the start/stop feature do come with larger batteries. I'm not sure if it would be an easy drop-in or not, I've been wondering about this possibility myself.
 

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Yup. The 51R is a lawnmower battery. It comes standard in many riding mowers, and the CR-V. In this case, bigger does mean better. I just finished upgrading my '07 to a Group 24F. The write-up is here: Gen 3 Group 24F Battery Upgrade .

Of course, my '07 is going to be a little different from your 2018. You can find all you need to know for your late model V in this main thread here:

Larger Group 24 Battery Install .

It will not void your warranty, and it will not harm your alternator, which cannot tell what size the battery is, and will behave normally. I went with an AGM battery. My two previous 512R's lasted less than 1.5 years each. I'm also installing a NOCO Genius 5 smart battery tender. Since I retired, I don't drive as often, so I will keep this plugged in to 110v, and it will keep the battery healthy all the time. All I have to do is unplug it when I go out, or else get a really, really long extension cord. :cool:

Actually, I think the install is easier for the Gen 5 than for my Gen 3. Read through the above thread's 14 or so pages and you'll find info for Gen 4 and 5 installs that should give you all you need to know. It does require a little work, but it's not brain surgery. I even used Odyssey parts to make it all officially Honda issue. Good luck, and let us know what you decide to do.
 

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then by all means run a 2ndary to the back cabin or move it all to the back of the cabin and top it with as many as one likes. I hear ya. /
 

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I have a 17 CRV that is 3+ years old. I have had zero problems with the battery in 36K miles. I don't do anything out of the ordinary and have never had an issue. I would really like to know why some batteries are failing and not others. I do on occasion monitor the voltage on my scan gauge, and it is usually at 14.3 volts on start and I have seen it down to 12. something after a long drive. Are there some bad batteries? or something wrong with the charge system?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I have a 17 CRV that is 3+ years old. I have had zero problems with the battery in 36K miles. I don't do anything out of the ordinary and have never had an issue. I would really like to know why some batteries are failing and not others. I do on occasion monitor the voltage on my scan gauge, and it is usually at 14.3 volts on start and I have seen it down to 12. something after a long drive. Are there some bad batteries? or something wrong with the charge system?
Maybe this explains it:
139057
 

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Maybe this explains it:
View attachment 139057
Yep... hot weather is a primary failure accelerator on batteries... followed closely by being in a persistent undercharged state (ie: below 40% of saturation charge).

1) The amount of charge at full charge actually declines with temperature in flooded cell batteries.

2) Hot weather tends to cause evaporation of the electrolyte as well... and so the cell electrolyte in each cell needs to be monitored periodically, and topped off with a little distilled water if the levels are low.

3) Hot weather tends to also sulfate the plates a bit faster as well, and plate sulfation is slow persistent killer of all batteries.

All of the above becomes a real problem for the infrequent or short trip driver... since the battery will often not be fully recharged after a drive.

And NO... a bigger battery will not change any of the above. People keep pressing this theory but it is simply not factual, and goes to a misunderstanding of how flooded cell batteries actually work. All a bigger battery does for you is give you another 20-30% of reserve charge (good for about 10 extra days on a gen5 CRV before the battery is dead, and the extra CCA you get from a bigger battery is wasted on a CRV engine. Better to just put a higher quality 51R in that gives you more reserve capacity charge in the same footprint.

An AGM battery will address some of the issues with heat better. , but they too have their own idiosyncrasies to deal with as well... so you need to know what you are buying and what you are not. In my view.. AGMs do not provide enough benefit for the additional cost required. Better investment to simply buy a premium 51R which will have better specifications than the stock OEMs, and most after market 51Rs.

Of course there is a school of thought that just ignores the battery, then complains when it dies before it's expected life span too. :D
 

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Yup. The 51R is a lawnmower battery. It comes standard in many riding mowers, and the CR-V. In this case, bigger does mean better. I just finished upgrading my '07 to a Group 24F. The write-up is here: Gen 3 Group 24F Battery Upgrade .

Of course, my '07 is going to be a little different from your 2018. You can find all you need to know for your late model V in this main thread here:

Larger Group 24 Battery Install .

It will not void your warranty, and it will not harm your alternator, which cannot tell what size the battery is, and will behave normally. I went with an AGM battery. My two previous 512R's lasted less than 1.5 years each. I'm also installing a NOCO Genius 5 smart battery tender. Since I retired, I don't drive as often, so I will keep this plugged in to 110v, and it will keep the battery healthy all the time. All I have to do is unplug it when I go out, or else get a really, really long extension cord. :cool:

Actually, I think the install is easier for the Gen 5 than for my Gen 3. Read through the above thread's 14 or so pages and you'll find info for Gen 4 and 5 installs that should give you all you need to know. It does require a little work, but it's not brain surgery. I even used Odyssey parts to make it all officially Honda issue. Good luck, and let us know what you decide to do.
Of course you can put any battery in your vehicle that you like, your vehicle, your choice. :)

But a Group 24 (or similar) is not going to buy you much in your gen3 CRV. A) you do not need the extra CCA, so that is a waste. B) a 24 only gives you about 25% more reserve charge capacity. C) gen3s have pretty low normal parasitic.. so the only thing you really have to deal with in a gen3 is the normal slow self-drain characteristics of the battery itself and the fact that every battery made is a ticking clock that ticks down persistently until it fails some years after the electrolyte is activated.

A gen5 benefits more from installing a larger battery, simply for the extra reserve capacity, which can extend the period of time before a sitting CRV depletes it's battery due to normal power down parasitics. But even then, the difference is small... 40-45 days idle vs 30-35 with a stock 51R installed.

Early battery failure is much more about allowing a battery to sit at a persistently low charge state, which accelerates plate sulfation + lack of any periodic checks and maintenance on these batteries.. which are not actually maintenance free. This is true.. regardless of the size battery you choose to install. Which is why periodic maintenance checks and use of a smart charger is such a benefit for motor vehicle battery life expectancy.
 

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.... Since I retired, I don't drive as often, so I will keep this plugged in to 110v, and it will keep the battery healthy all the time. All I have to do is unplug it when I go out, or else get a really, really long extension cord. :cool:

...
Don't they make cordless chargers now? In fact the 2020 Touring comes with one. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Yup. The 51R is a lawnmower battery. It comes standard in many riding mowers, and the CR-V. In this case, bigger does mean better. I just finished upgrading my '07 to a Group 24F. The write-up is here: Gen 3 Group 24F Battery Upgrade .

Of course, my '07 is going to be a little different from your 2018. You can find all you need to know for your late model V in this main thread here:

Larger Group 24 Battery Install .

It will not void your warranty, and it will not harm your alternator, which cannot tell what size the battery is, and will behave normally. I went with an AGM battery. My two previous 512R's lasted less than 1.5 years each. I'm also installing a NOCO Genius 5 smart battery tender. Since I retired, I don't drive as often, so I will keep this plugged in to 110v, and it will keep the battery healthy all the time. All I have to do is unplug it when I go out, or else get a really, really long extension cord. :cool:

Actually, I think the install is easier for the Gen 5 than for my Gen 3. Read through the above thread's 14 or so pages and you'll find info for Gen 4 and 5 installs that should give you all you need to know. It does require a little work, but it's not brain surgery. I even used Odyssey parts to make it all officially Honda issue. Good luck, and let us know what you decide to do.
Thanks for the information. There are a lot of links involved that I had never explored.
But I still haven't seen any posts regarding actually converting a Gen 5 CRV to use a larger battery.
 

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The 2020 model year comes with a larger battery, likely on account of the start/stop function but doubt it would fit in an earlier model. Heat is the big battery killer though. In Ontario I normally get at least 5 years, even from my dinky motorcycle battery or my
FE31E800-6BED-4FE0-A056-438246B13C93.jpeg
vehicle batteries, however I use a battery maintainer on the bike over the winter and when I don’t plan on driving any vehicle for over a week.(Have 3 maintainers..picked up the third one during Covid)
 

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Discussion Starter #17
....
And NO... a bigger battery will not change any of the above. People keep pressing this theory but it is simply not factual, and goes to a misunderstanding of how flooded cell batteries actually work. All a bigger battery does for you is give you another 20-30% of reserve charge (good for about 10 extra days on a gen5 CRV before the battery is dead, ...
Like I said in my original post, I am looking for greater endurance. 30% greater endurance seems significant to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
The 2020 model year comes with a larger battery, likely on account of the start/stop function but doubt it would fit in an earlier model. Heat is the big battery killer though. In Ontario I normally get at least 5 years, even from my dinky motorcycle battery or my View attachment 139061 vehicle batteries, however I use a battery maintainer on the bike over the winter and when I don’t plan on driving any vehicle for over a week.(Have 3 maintainers..picked up the third one during Covid)
That sucker is significantly larger than the 51R in my 2017 EXL.
Do you know what Battery Group it is?
 

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Unsure what group but 450 cold cranking amps and A 57Ah battery with a notification for start stop systems. I do believe that keeping any battery over 80% charge is essential for long life.

954ABA63-B990-4C47-B728-64F03826571E.jpeg
7FC29962-AC26-4881-BFD7-7A4DDB83C6D6.jpeg
 

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Unsure what group but 450 cold cranking amps and A 57Ah battery with a notification for start stop systems. I do believe that keeping any battery over 80% charge is essential for long life.

View attachment 139064 View attachment 139065
Thanks for sharing.

I see it is labeled as a Group 4A. First time I have seen a Group 4 battery in a Honda. Group 4s are classified as heavy duty commercial and special tractor batteries, and are available in both 12vdc and 6vdc. The "A" classification is probably to note it is specified for Automobile use.

My guess is that this battery has more robust plates, to account for higher loading of start/stop cycles in 2020 CRVs. The CCA is low compared to larger batteries, but pretty close to the same as a 51R. It does however have a 57amp/hour reserve capacity, making it's reserve capacity ~ the same as the Group 24 Batteries Honda puts into all it's V6 vehicles ..so clearly this battery is designed for numerous starts over time due to the auto start stop feature. A 51R by comparison has a reserve capacity of 40-45 amp/hours.

It looks physically very much like what Honda now puts in new generation Accords, and now Civics (both of which have a 1.5T engine)... which is labeled as an H5 Class battery. H5 is similar to Group 24 in CCA and reserve capacity.

Does anyone know for sure if this battery is also in the non-hybrid 2020 CRVs? I ask because this battery may be present for the hybrid platforms in general... rather than specifically for auto start/stop. Or perhaps the new 2020 1.5T CRVs come with an H5 as they do in Accords and Civics.

It will be interesting to see if this battery group class = fewer complaints about early dead batteries. Time will tell. I bet this battery is on the expensive side of battery pricing to replace though.
 
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