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Has anyone replaced their 51R with a larger battery?

44283 Views 134 Replies 41 Participants Last post by  BobInPa
I’ve had it with the 51R battery size chosen by Honda for the Gen 5 CRV. I am on my second Honda battery, the first one was replaced under my New Car Warranty in September 2018. I know that it is totally my fiscal responsibility to replace my current battery, so I’m not going to mess around with another Honda battery. My 2017 EXL has been jump started 7 times in the last 3.5 years, way too often as far as I’m concerned. Actually each of my Honda batteries made it one whole year before they started failing, so it is really 7 jump starts in 1.5 years. So I want to replace my 51R battery with a larger battery with greater endurance.

Has anyone replaced their 51R with a larger battery that does not require any modifications to the existing battery containing hardware? Hardware like tie-downs, trays, cables, hood, etc.

I know this subject has been discussed many times before in the last 3.5 years but I don’t remember reading an actual answer to my question.
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captainbeandip and williamsji know what they're
Welcome to the forum! Actually, those numbers may be true for the minimal low-price batteries, but I went from a 51R with 410 CCA to a 24F AGM with 710, which is more like a 75% increase, not 25%. But the real point is that the 51R is simply inadequate for many of us, and more is always better. Especially when you live in a more extreme climate, and/or plan an audio upgrade, like me, and similarly don't drive daily. The numbers don't lie, and neither does the result.
as I laugh at the posts not the issue. still no one things about additional batteries. or boosters . but worry bot the science of the battery
as I laugh at the posts not the issue. still no one things about additional batteries. or boosters . but worry bot the science of the battery
The reason is because adding another battery will be much more difficult and expensive than just using a larger battery.

Using a booster to jump start the car is fine, but you aren't solving the problem, and you'll still have to deal with a damaged battery that needs to be replaced.

And I'm sure a mom with a couple of kids coming out of a grocery store isn't going to be thrilled to find a dead battery and then go through the hassle of jump starting it.
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I have a 17 CRV that is 3+ years old. I have had zero problems with the battery in 36K miles. I don't do anything out of the ordinary and have never had an issue. I would really like to know why some batteries are failing and not others. I do on occasion monitor the voltage on my scan gauge, and it is usually at 14.3 volts on start and I have seen it down to 12. something after a long drive. Are there some bad batteries? or something wrong with the charge system?
My buddy has the same car and is having battery issues..lives in WI
It's a car, Lol, and if you have a problem out of no where then AAA, or the provided warranty of road side assistance pays off, If you take caution, a booster, cables etc. you then can worry bout the replacement due to whatever reaons the bat gave.

As this sounds like drying electrolytes, on a Maintenance free battery is the issue of the Owner, not looking at the line, the level of fluid is to be at, while the caps are removable and Distilled water will correct. Heck I got absolute no clue at all about small batteries. I am on a car forum not a battery forum Ha ha ha 1 post up no just an opinion IMHO at the least Lol
The thing we are discussing here is the fact that. for many owners, the CR-V's Group 51R battery is simply inadequate, because it is too small. This has been a common complaint for the entire run of CR-V's all the way back to the beginning. Honda chose to install a battery that is just not large enough to be dependable. It's not about battery condition, or care. It's about the fact that many owners need more from the system, because of their particular driving needs. I'd go so far as to say I consider it a defect. After all, in my case, I took good care of 3 Group 51R batteries in a row in the space of less than 2 years, and all 3 went bad. At that point, doing the same thing again and expecting a different result is the definition of insanity. So I upgraded.

If your situation means that you live in the right climate, and do the right amount of driving, the stock battery will probably be fine. But, if your use falls the slightest bit outside those parameters, the battery is just not good enough. If you want to keep throwing money after more 51R's, I'm sure the battery makers will appreciate it. But it will be expensive, troublesome, and will likely cost you a starter sooner too. Not to mention all the hassles of frequently being stranded, always at the worst possible times. Or, you can realize that it's just a machine, and you can outsmart it!
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I’ve had it with the 51R battery size chosen by Honda for the Gen 5 CRV. I am on my second Honda battery, the first one was replaced under my New Car Warranty in September 2018. I know that it is totally my fiscal responsibility to replace my current battery, so I’m not going to mess around with another Honda battery. My 2017 EXL has been jump started 7 times in the last 3.5 years, way too often as far as I’m concerned. Actually each of my Honda batteries made it one whole year before they started failing, so it is really 7 jump starts in 1.5 years. So I want to replace my 51R battery with a larger battery with greater endurance.

Has anyone replaced their 51R with a larger battery that does not require any modifications to the existing battery containing hardware? Hardware like tie-downs, trays, cables, hood, etc.

I know this subject has been discussed many times before in the last 3.5 years but I don’t remember reading an actual answer to my question.
There's no way to put in a larger battery without additional hardware and have the battery protected against heat and held down properly. What it came with fits the 51R and nothing larger. But why does that matter, since the cost is negligible for the extras?

We now know that the brand new 2020 with the 1.5L has a new larger battery, Group 4A/5H. That battery is essentially the same size as the Group 35 battery. What does that tell us? It tells us the earlier Gen 5 has room for a larger battery. So, to do this swap in your 2017-19, you'll need to do some measuring. I suspect the 24F might be tight. This is the picture posted earlier by Nuke of the new 2020 battery in situ:

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Hmmm. Looking closely, it appears this battery has an insulation wrap on it instead of a box. Anybody else see that? If so, maybe you could get the tray, hold-down, bolts, and wrap, and just use this same 4A/5H battery.

It would be handy if someone with a 2017-19 could post a picture similar to the one above but showing their 51R battery.
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There's no way to put in a larger battery without additional hardware and have the battery protected against heat and held down properly. What it came with fits the 51R and nothing larger. But why does that matter, since the cost is negligible for the extras?

We now know that the brand new 2020 with the 1.5L has a new larger battery, Group 4A/5H. That battery is essentially the same size as the Group 35 battery. What does that tell us? It tells us the earlier Gen 5 has room for a larger battery. So, to do this swap in your 2017-19, you'll need to do some measuring. I suspect the 24F might be tight. This is the picture posted earlier by Nuke of the new 2020 battery in situ:

View attachment 139266

Hmmm. Looking closely, it appears this battery has an insulation wrap on it instead of a box. Anybody else see that? If so, maybe you could get the tray, hold-down, bolts, and wrap, and just use this same 4A/5H battery.

It would be handy if someone with a 2017-19 could post a picture similar to the one above but showing their 51R battery.
The 51R battery has a box, a tray and insulation helping it attempt to fill the space allotted to it.
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As you can see there is an good 1.25 inches available to the left side of the 51R plus a goodly amount to the right.
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As we already know a Group 35 battery will fit without all the fillers.
Has anyone replaced their 51R with a larger battery?
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It would be really great if someone active on this forum had both a Gen 5 CRV with the 1.5 T engine and a Gen 10 Accord with the 1.5 T engine.
That way we could find out if the Accord's Group 47/H5/L2 battery will fit in the space allotted to the CRV’s 51R battery.

But what are the odds of that?
It would be really great if someone active on this forum had both a Gen 5 CRV with the 1.5 T engine and a Gen 10 Accord with the 1.5 T engine.
That way we could find out if the Accord's Group 47/H5/L2 battery will fit in the space allotted to the CRV’s 51R battery.

But what are the odds of that?
I have both a gen5 CRV and a gen10 Accord.

The area around the battery is different on the Accord compared to the CRV. The CRV is less cramped, as can be seen in your photos. Then again.. the Accord already has an H5 in it.

ANY battery that will physically fit in an Accord will easily fit in the CRV. Width on the H5 is the only real consideration, in determining if you even need a new tray or not.

L W H
51R 9.374 x 5.0625 x 8.8125
H5 9.565 x 6.9375 x 7.5000

Honda puts insulator sleeves around their batteries, and you would need a different one for the H5 for sure.. if you want to install a new battery with one (recommended, but not absolutely necessary).
Here is my 2020 battery, same perspective
Vehicle Auto part Car Engine Automotive exterior
as a few posts earlier. Approx 10 x 7 inches for battery itself, maybe slightly over 10 inches.
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How important is the insulating box on these batteries? I recently changed the battery on my son's 2016 Odyssey. I used an Advance Auto 24F AGM battery. When replacing, I used the lower box but forgot to put on the upper box.
Do I have to put it on? I just don't feel like having to remove the cables and hold down to do this, but I will if it is beneficial.
How important is the insulating box on these batteries? I recently changed the battery on my son's 2016 Odyssey. I used an Advance Auto 24F AGM battery. When replacing, I used the lower box but forgot to put on the upper box.
Do I have to put it on? I just don't feel like having to remove the cables and hold down to do this, but I will if it is beneficial.
We never used to have these maybe 12 years back. Maybe shields the battery somewhat from brutal heat and cold?
The insulating box is for heat protection, as the battery is close to the engine and the whole compartment is very compacted and full and subject to getting very hot. I'd put that box back in ASAP. They never used to cram the battery in such a tiny space so close to the engine, but they do now. Engines run hotter now too.

From what I can see in the pictures above (Thanks Bob!) there is room to put in a 24F, but I think I'd try to get the newer parts and go with the 4A or 5H.
The battery space in the Odyssey is not as cramped as in the CR-V, but I guess I'll play it safe and put the box back in.
In an Odyssey forum, someone told of an Interstate dealer who intentionally left out the box, claiming it trapped battery heat and shortened battery life. Then again, mechanics sometimes think they know more than they do. I'll go on the assumption that Honda wouldn't spend the money on that box it they didn't feel it is necessary.
The insulating box is for heat protection, as the battery is close to the engine and the whole compartment is very compacted and full and subject to getting very hot. I'd put that box back in ASAP. They never used to cram the battery in such a tiny space so close to the engine, but they do now. Engines run hotter now too.

From what I can see in the pictures above (Thanks Bob!) there is room to put in a 24F, but I think I'd try to get the newer parts and go with the 4A or 5H.
I'm not so sure about that. Remember all the concerns about some CRV's engines not getting hot enough to provide cabin heat?

With that said, Honda installed the battery insulating box for a reason, probably a good idea to keep it there, even if one changes to a bigger battery (which in my humble opinion), is not needed.
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In an Odyssey forum, someone told of an Interstate dealer who intentionally left out the box, claiming it trapped battery heat and shortened battery life. Then again, mechanics sometimes think they know more than they do. I'll go on the assumption that Honda wouldn't spend the money on that box it they didn't feel it is necessary.
Said mechanic is an idiot. An insulating sleeve will prevent thermal intrusion from the hot engine bay penetrating into the battery to begin with. And batteries on modern charging systems do not over-charge or self-heat the battery to any level that would degrade the battery life.

Aftermarket accessory manufacturers even make small heating pads for starter batteries for use in cold weather conditions to help keep the battery from suffering damage due to extreme cold.

I agree with you.. Honda spent money to put the sleeves on the batteries for a reason. Always cost conscious in the market segments they produce vehicles for.. Honda never spends money on a part for nothing. The only bad part about Honda is they do not generally communicate the "reason" to consumers very well on the various things they engineer into their vehicles.. which leaves room for wild speculation, conspiracy theories, and of course idiot mechanics who always think they know better than Honda (or any manufacturer). Please Note: this is not a dig on mechanics in general... only those that insist on telling customers foolish things.
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Well, I just went out and put the box back in. It is simple plastic, no foam insulation like on the CR-V.
Well, I just went out and put the box back in. It is simple plastic, no foam insulation like on the CR-V.
Unsure when they started introducing foam but my 2004 Acura and 2005 Nissan just had a plastic box and engine compartments are pretty tight, esp on the Acura. Earlier vehicles did not even have a plastic box mind you there tended to be more room in those engine compartments. The insulation will apparently help with battery life in cold and heat. I can see that especially driving in brutal cold or parking outside in the winter with a strong wind blowing into the car...
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