Honda CR-V Owners Club Forums banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
408 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
We all know that the CR-V is not a sports car/hot rod/tire melting beast. But it is fun to drive, nonetheless It's a functional, gas sipping, money saving economy utility vehicle, but let's put those facts aside for a moment, please.

The turbo motors in some sports cars (maybe all) are able to produce more horsepower when a higher octane fuel is used, but in most cases, they do not require it to function normally.

I have read in this forum before that using a higher octane fuel in the 1.5L turbo motor will produce some degree of a power increase. Scientifically, it makes sense but is there any evidence to back this info up?

I can say from experience with my last vehicle, which had a non-turbo motor, that it ran more smoothly and with a tiny power increase by using a higher octane fuel.

However, for every one person who states that there is some benefit (more power) to using a higher octane fuel, there is another who claims that it is a waste of money and that there is no benefit and some even claim that using a higher octane will lower the fuel economy.

Well, has anyone hooked this motor up to a dynometer while running a higher octane fuel through it to reveal the truth? Is there any evidence specific to this particular motor one way or the other?

Obviously, this question has been asked again and again but has the actual truth ever been obtained? Let's find it here. Somebody on this planet has to have done the research with the proper metering tools and I'd bet anything that it's the racers who have done so.

Let's not go back and forth endlessly here with opinions. Let's see some actual numbers, stats, readouts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
821 Posts
Octane is boosted by substance that prevents the fuel mixture from detonating early due to heat and pressure. That's the whole difference between low and high octane gasoline. The amount of energy to be converted during combustion is the same. If you put regular in a car that requires premium then the fuel will ignite prematurely and the knock sensor registers it, the ECU retards the ignition to suppress the possibility of damaging the engine. This drops the output power. Does not work the other way around.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
408 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Octane is boosted by substance that prevents the fuel mixture from detonating early due to heat and pressure. That's the whole difference between low and high octane gasoline. The amount of energy to be converted during combustion is the same. If you put regular in a car that requires premium then the fuel will ignite prematurely and the knock sensor registers it, the ECU retards the ignition to suppress the possibility of damaging the engine. This drops the output power. Does not work the other way around.
Then is the ECU not capable (at least in turbo charged SPORTS cars) of advancing the ignition/timing as well, to compensate for higher octane fuels? It would seem so since there are claims of getting more power from a given motor by using higher octane fuels.

And does a forced induction motor not change the formula in this case?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
821 Posts
Factory ECU, you can do whatever you like with a programmable ECU. However, you would also need a different camshaft for the valves to work accordingly. That's how stuff gets expensive and broken fast. Add forced induction and it complicates tuning exponentially. And bigger injectors, more durable pistons/valves/connecting rods, exhaust etc. Seen plenty of cases where guys work on engines (for years) that never run right regardless the amount of time and money thrown at them. And never pass emission tests.
 
  • Like
Reactions: SnakeCharmer

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
In most of the United States Regular gas contains 10% ethanol which has less energy than gas. Many stations sell an ethanol free Premium or Super grade of gas which will give you more power.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,125 Posts
In most of the United States Regular gas contains 10% ethanol which has less energy than gas. Many stations sell an ethanol free Premium or Super grade of gas which will give you more power.
Octane rating is an anti-knock metric.

Ethanol is a common additive to BOOST the octane rating of gas fuel blends, even though 10% ethanol means ~3% less energy in the fuel blend (which is so small any well designed engine will not even notice it... except for some German designed engines that demand premium octanes).

Pros and cons of ethanol additives is covered quite well here: Fuel Ethanol: Hero or Villain?

As for CRVS.. with the 1.5T engine... there is more than anecdotal evidence presented in this very forum that the 1.5T runs less rich when fed a fuel blend with 10% ethanol, regardless of fuel octane rating. And for this particular engine.. THAT is a good thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,125 Posts
In the old days.... I think octane of the fuel also correlated with higher energy fuel, and older more primitive engines would respond favorably to higher octane fuel. This of course was all before the removal of MTBE from fuel blends, the broad use of ECU controlled fuel and ignition timing and the introduction of ethanol as a common octane booster.

Now days.. with these modern highly refined and electronically controlled engine designs, I doubt most engines will actually respond to a higher octane fuel when on stock ECU setups.

You can of course use a number of software products to reflash your ECU and boost the overall performance of your CRV engine. Depending on what you reflash to.. it MAY require that you step up to a higher octane fuel.

Keep in mind.. Honda is very conservative in their engine designs for consumer motor vehicles... so there is plenty of head room left in the engines (based on Civic enthusiasts pushing the same engines in their Civics to higher perfrmance) such that you can safely uptune your engine without much worry of shortening it's life span, or even changing out any parts. And if you really want to push the engine, then a series of specially tuned air intakes, etc. are available to let you reach even further with reflashing of the ECU. If interested in pursuing.. then I suggest spending some quality time in some of the Civic enthusiast forums on the internet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,125 Posts
And given that they used a gen5 CRV with a 1.5T as one of their baseline test vehicles... the results, quoted below, are very telling in the context of the CRV:

Even as it's sucking down as much as 18.5 psi of boost, the CR-V's 1.5-liter inline-four isn't interested in 93 octane. Honda asks for 87 octane and makes no claims that raising the fuel octane will lift performance. Based on our testing, premium fuel might as well not exist in the CR-V's world.

We could see this coming. During a similar Car and Driver test 18 years ago, an Accord powered by a 3.0-liter V-6 made more power and accelerated quicker on regular fuel than on premium. The modern CR-V, with half the displacement but rated at just 10 fewer ponies, makes the same argument: don't waste your money on premium. Switching from 87 octane to 93 yielded a 7-hp gain on the dynamometer, but that advantage was lost in the noise at the track. There, the CR-V's zero-to-60-mph and quarter-mile times both tracked a tenth of a second slower on the expensive stuff. While fuel economy at 75 mph ticked up from 27.3 mpg to 27.6 mpg on premium, that's a 1 percent improvement for a 21 percent higher cost.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
408 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
And given that they used a gen5 CRV with a 1.5T as one of their baseline test vehicles... the results, quoted below, are very telling in the context of the CRV:
Perfect. This answers my question.

The only option left is mount a second 1.5L turbo w/CVT under the hood for the rear wheels (Unless I wanna spend the cash on fully race tricking out the existing motor and CVT). In reality, there actually is enough room in that engine bay to add a second motor and trans, lol. Imagine how bad ass twin 1.5L turbo motors under the hood, fully synced would be! :giggle:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,125 Posts
Perfect. This answers my question.

The only option left is mount a second 1.5L turbo w/CVT under the hood for the rear wheels (Unless I wanna spend the cash on fully race tricking out the existing motor and CVT). In reality, there actually is enough room in that engine bay to add a second motor and trans, lol. Imagine how bad ass twin 1.5L turbo motors under the hood, fully synced would be! :giggle:
LOL.... (y)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Although I have the 2.4 engine...I tried the Super V Shell 93 octane, starting from a nearly empty fuel tank and filling up three times with the Shell Super V 93 octane. Not one bit of change in gas mileage nor was there any power gain. The sole purpose was to utilize the extra cleaning additives in Super V to clean the combustion chamber/valve train.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
143 Posts
I've used Chevron 91 vs. 87 on my 2017 CRV for at least three empty tank cycles and have not noticed any differences with respect to power or gas mileage. Clearly not a controlled test but it is nothing like my 2007 Toyota Tacoma. In the Tacoma it was a significant difference in power which even my son would notice when he drove the truck. For the CRV there simply is not a clear advantage for higher octane fuel. I will say that using tier one fuel at any octane "may" be better for the DFI.
 

·
Registered
2017 CRV EX AWD
Joined
·
1,027 Posts
A friend who is a honda tech has been seeing lots of 1.5t coming in with burned up injectors and throwing various codes.

He recommended top tier fuel and of the cheap stuff.
I personally dont use my v much but will be switching it up.

this was was lurked inside his last crv with 80k on it
139650
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top